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Sudden Cardiac Death

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SPORTS
By Dr. Jeffrey S. Mandak, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Sudden cardiac death is the most common mode of death in this country with more than 300,000 deaths per year, a third of which occur during physical activity. It is estimated that approximately 1,000 children die of sudden death each year. Sudden cardiac death most often occurs as the result of ventricular fibrillation (VF), an abrupt irregular heart rhythm that causes the heart to quiver inneffectively rather than pumping normally. In lacrosse and other sports such as baseball and hockey, however, another unpredictable and relatively uncommon source of cardiac death has been recognized — commotio cordis.
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SPORTS
By Dr. Jeffrey S. Mandak, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Sudden cardiac death is the most common mode of death in this country with more than 300,000 deaths per year, a third of which occur during physical activity. It is estimated that approximately 1,000 children die of sudden death each year. Sudden cardiac death most often occurs as the result of ventricular fibrillation (VF), an abrupt irregular heart rhythm that causes the heart to quiver inneffectively rather than pumping normally. In lacrosse and other sports such as baseball and hockey, however, another unpredictable and relatively uncommon source of cardiac death has been recognized — commotio cordis.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | May 24, 2009
Tim Myers, an 18-year-old discus thrower participating in the state track meet at Morgan State University on Saturday, took a break from the heat and dashed into the university student center, where a team of doctors from Johns Hopkins Hospital had set up a makeshift heart checkup program. The Elkton teen slipped off his red mesh jersey and lay down on his side as Ken Cresswell, a cardiac stenographer, placed electrodes on his chest. A mix of blues, greens, oranges and yellows pulsated as an ultrasound showed blood pumping through the aortic valve of his heart.
HEALTH
By Holly Selby and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2010
Since 1980, when a physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital first implanted a defibrillator in a human being, doctors have found that the devices can halt sudden cardiac death in many patients whose hearts have weakened pumping ability, as well as for some who have suffered a heart attack. But a recent study by researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center shows that about half of all patients who meet nationally accepted guidelines for treatment with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, known as ICDs, are not receiving the recommended treatment.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - Merck & Co. Inc.'s recalled Vioxx painkiller may have contributed to 27,785 heart attacks and deaths from 1999 through 2003 because of the drug's effects on the cardiovascular system, U.S. regulators said in a report published online yesterday. Vioxx caused more heart attacks and deaths from sudden cardiac arrest than would have occurred if patients taking Vioxx were on Pfizer Inc.'s Celebrex, Food and Drug Administration researcher David J. Graham concluded after analyzing 1.4 million patient records.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | July 3, 2008
Although it receives less publicity than many medical conditions, sudden cardiac arrest accounts for 310,000 deaths in the U.S. every year, or about 850 deaths a day, according to the American Heart Association. But death from sudden cardiac arrest can be prevented by using a simple device called an AED, or automatic external defibrillator, says Dr. Stephen Pollock, chief of the cardiology division at St. Joseph Medical Center. What is sudden cardiac death? Sudden cardiac death is the result of a lethal heart rhythm called ventricular fibrillation.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 10, 2003
The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine has received a four-year, $24 million grant to establish a center for the study of sudden cardiac death, school officials said yesterday. The grant was made by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a Las Vegas-based philanthropy founded in 1954 by the media entrepreneur for whom it is named. At the time of his death in 1993, Reynolds owned 75 newspapers as well as cable television and outdoor advertising companies. The Hopkins center will pursue therapies that include using stem cells to prevent sudden deaths and use modern imaging techniques to identify the abnormalities that put people at risk.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
ONE REASON sports fascinate so many of us is that they repeatedly provide insights about many of life's basics. Learning. Striving. Sharing. Trying. Failing. Overcoming. Losing. Winning. ... Dying. If you're a runner who is middle-age or older, you're hyper-aware these days of something called sudden cardiac death. It means dropping dead while following what's often called a healthy lifestyle. Just from this newspaper's pages since October, it was a TV news director, 46, dying of a heart attack while jogging in Woodbine.
HEALTH
By Holly Selby and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2010
Since 1980, when a physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital first implanted a defibrillator in a human being, doctors have found that the devices can halt sudden cardiac death in many patients whose hearts have weakened pumping ability, as well as for some who have suffered a heart attack. But a recent study by researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center shows that about half of all patients who meet nationally accepted guidelines for treatment with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, known as ICDs, are not receiving the recommended treatment.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff Joe Nawrozki contributed to this article | May 6, 1991
Samuel J. Garnett Jr. can live with the device that was implanted in his abdomen three years ago.The instrument, about the size of a deck of cards, is called the automatic implantable cardio verter defibrillator (AICD) and is wired to his heart to monitor its beats. It will deliver electric shocks to his heart if it detects life-threatening arrhythmias.Garnett's defibrillator has not fired since the surgery to implant it. But he had a history of cardiac arrests before 1988 and feels secure knowing that the AICD could save his life.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | May 24, 2009
Tim Myers, an 18-year-old discus thrower participating in the state track meet at Morgan State University on Saturday, took a break from the heat and dashed into the university student center, where a team of doctors from Johns Hopkins Hospital had set up a makeshift heart checkup program. The Elkton teen slipped off his red mesh jersey and lay down on his side as Ken Cresswell, a cardiac stenographer, placed electrodes on his chest. A mix of blues, greens, oranges and yellows pulsated as an ultrasound showed blood pumping through the aortic valve of his heart.
FEATURES
By HOLLY SELBY | July 3, 2008
Although it receives less publicity than many medical conditions, sudden cardiac arrest accounts for 310,000 deaths in the U.S. every year, or about 850 deaths a day, according to the American Heart Association. But death from sudden cardiac arrest can be prevented by using a simple device called an AED, or automatic external defibrillator, says Dr. Stephen Pollock, chief of the cardiology division at St. Joseph Medical Center. What is sudden cardiac death? Sudden cardiac death is the result of a lethal heart rhythm called ventricular fibrillation.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - Merck & Co. Inc.'s recalled Vioxx painkiller may have contributed to 27,785 heart attacks and deaths from 1999 through 2003 because of the drug's effects on the cardiovascular system, U.S. regulators said in a report published online yesterday. Vioxx caused more heart attacks and deaths from sudden cardiac arrest than would have occurred if patients taking Vioxx were on Pfizer Inc.'s Celebrex, Food and Drug Administration researcher David J. Graham concluded after analyzing 1.4 million patient records.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 10, 2003
The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine has received a four-year, $24 million grant to establish a center for the study of sudden cardiac death, school officials said yesterday. The grant was made by the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, a Las Vegas-based philanthropy founded in 1954 by the media entrepreneur for whom it is named. At the time of his death in 1993, Reynolds owned 75 newspapers as well as cable television and outdoor advertising companies. The Hopkins center will pursue therapies that include using stem cells to prevent sudden deaths and use modern imaging techniques to identify the abnormalities that put people at risk.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
ONE REASON sports fascinate so many of us is that they repeatedly provide insights about many of life's basics. Learning. Striving. Sharing. Trying. Failing. Overcoming. Losing. Winning. ... Dying. If you're a runner who is middle-age or older, you're hyper-aware these days of something called sudden cardiac death. It means dropping dead while following what's often called a healthy lifestyle. Just from this newspaper's pages since October, it was a TV news director, 46, dying of a heart attack while jogging in Woodbine.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 1996
With the beginning of the school year approaching, the American Heart Association yesterday issued the first national recommendations for screening high-school and college athletes for fatal heart ailments.Such ailments are responsible for the rare instances when seemingly healthy young people collapse and die on the playing field. Though it is unknown precisely how often this happens, the heart association estimates that the incidence of sudden cardiac death among high-school athletes is from 1 in 100,000 to 1 in 300,000.
NEWS
By SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS | May 27, 1998
SAN ANTONIO -- Six million healthy Americans not previously considered candidates for cholesterol-lowering treatment could slash their risk of heart problems by a third with drug therapy, researchers say.But with the cost of treatment as high as $100 per month, the question of who should be treated is likely to be decided by individual doctors and their patients based on additional risk factors, at least until more information is available, experts said."This...
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