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BUSINESS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 1996
It too frequently happens that a single owner, acting within the structural letter of the law, materially ignores the nature of adjoining property, either by construction of undesirable buildings or objectionable use of those already erected. To prevent the possibility of such a misfortune, the company has adopted restrictions as to the character, location and occupancy of buildings.So reads an 1890 brochure promoting the first home sales in Sudbrook Park.As one of the first planned communities in Maryland, Sudbrook Park established deed restrictions on setbacks and lot size that laid the foundation for modern zoning ordinances.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Baltimore County police said Tuesday they were searching for a man whose elderly grandparents were found dead this week in the Pikesville home that the three shared. Vaughn George Pepper, 87 and Marjorie Marie Pepper, 85, were discovered in their home Monday afternoon. Police are investigating their deaths as homicides and said they do not believe the killings were random. Detectives continue to search for the couple's grandson, Matthew Long, 31, who lived with his grandparents in the 800 block of Olmstead Road, to question him. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said they are not calling him a suspect.
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FEATURES
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Evening Sun Staff | September 16, 1991
THE TELEPHONE POLES and fire hydrants that line the street are fake, but the excitement that crackles through the normally quiet neighborhood in Sudbrook Park is very real."
NEWS
By Patrick K. Lackey | June 6, 2007
Two things Americans hate are density and sprawl. Fortunately, there are solutions to each. The solution to density is sprawl, and the solution to sprawl is density. No problem. Recent reports on a Baltimore City Council member's effort to restrict corner stores brought to mind two other things Americans hate: busy stores close by and long drives to buy even such routine items as milk. The solution to having stores too close is to put them far away. The solution to long drives to stores is to put them close by. Hey, I have a solution to everything.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1997
For Baltimore County historians, it was deja vu all over again.One week after the Baltimore County Landmark Preservation Commission scheduled a February public hearing on whether to designate the oldest surviving house in Pikesville a historic site, the 190-year-old structure suddenly was razed by its new owner.Last week's demolition of the tiny log cabin in Sudbrook Park echoed the 1996 destruction of the 1767 Samuel Owings house in Owings Mills -- demolished to make way for an office building as preservationists and the landmark commission unsuccessfully rallied to save it.The latest incident has some local preservationists saying the county should toughen the landmarks commission's procedures for protecting historic property.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1999
When landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted Sr. first drew up plans for Sudbrook Park more than a century ago, he had trouble finding an engineer willing to work with him.Until that time, village roads were always laid straight as a ruler. Olmsted proposed a community with curved roads. The engineers were stumped.Yesterday, near the intersection of two of Olmsted's curvy streets, about 75 residents of Sudbrook gathered to honor Olmsted and the neighborhood he created 110 years ago."He was a visionary," Melanie Anson, a Sudbrook Park resident and author of a book on the community's history, told the audience of residents and county officials.
BUSINESS
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2005
When architect Darragh Brady and her husband, Edward, decided to move from New York City to Baltimore in 1989, they had no idea where they would end up living. On an exploratory trip, they drove through a small neighborhood in Pikesville called Sudbrook Park. The Bradys knew instantly that it was the place for them. "We absolutely fell in love with it," Brady said, "and we've been in love with it ever since." It's not surprising that an architect would be drawn to Sudbrook Park. The neighborhood was designed by one of America's most famous landscape architects, Frederick Law Olmsted Sr., the man behind New York's Central Park.
NEWS
August 21, 2003
T. Newell Cox Jr., a retired vice president of Baltimore contracting firm Concord Associates Inc., died of cancer Tuesday at his home in Sudbrook Park. He was 79. Mr. Cox was born and raised at 722 Howard Road in Sudbrook Park. Except for a brief time when he was first married, he spent the rest of his life in a house next door at 724 Howard Road. After graduating in 1940 from St. Paul's School for Boys, he went to work for Consolidated Engineering Co. Inc. He enlisted in the Army in 1944 and served in Europe with the 407th Infantry Division.
NEWS
December 29, 1991
A Mass of Christian burial for Francis J. Plogman, a retired shipfitter and labor union leader, will be offered at 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Church, 101 Church Lane in Pikesville.Mr. Plogman, 75, died in his sleep at his Sudbrook Park home yesterday. He suffered from heart ailments and diabetes.He retired in 1980 after 40 years at the Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. in Baltimore. The ship yard is now closed.He was an active member of Local 31 of the Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
On Tuesday, February 3, 2004, FANNIE GINSBURG (nee Podolsky), beloved wife of the late Daniel Ginsburg, devoted mother of Bill Ginsburg of Balto., MD, dear mother-in-law of Suzanne Ginsburg, devoted sister of the late, Raymond Podolsky, Morris Munsey, Edward Podolsky and Bessie Cramer, loving grandmother of Steven and Marcy Ginsburg, Ellen Ginsburg, loving great-grandmother of Michael and Lauren Ginsburg. Also survived by loving nieces, nephews and dear friends. Services and interment will be held at Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane on Thursday, February 5 at 3:30 P.M. Please omit flowers.
NEWS
By MARIE GULLARD and MARIE GULLARD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2006
Since 1985, Donna Siegel has been living a wish fulfilled. "When I was a little girl," she says, "we'd drive through Sudbrook Park, and I dreamed of someday owning a house here." Sudbrook Park is no ordinary Pikesville neighborhood. Designed in 1889 by Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903), the father of American landscape architecture, it is a National Register Historic District with an impressive panorama of large homes, many situated majestically on expansive front lawns. The three-story shingled home of Donna and Brian Siegel is referred to as a Four-Square, with two large rooms on either side of a center hall.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Dorothy W. Diehl, a retired Curtis Bay Elementary School vice principal and teacher, died of complications from a stroke Saturday at the Wesley Home, where she had lived since 2001. The longtime Sudbrook Park resident was 95. Born Dorothy Carroll Wilson in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook, she was a 1926 graduate of Western High School and earned a teacher's certificate from what is now Towson University. She also studied piano and dance at the Peabody Conservatory. At the 1926 Easter Parade on Charles Street, she met Harold W. Diehl Sr., and they married in 1933.
BUSINESS
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2005
When architect Darragh Brady and her husband, Edward, decided to move from New York City to Baltimore in 1989, they had no idea where they would end up living. On an exploratory trip, they drove through a small neighborhood in Pikesville called Sudbrook Park. The Bradys knew instantly that it was the place for them. "We absolutely fell in love with it," Brady said, "and we've been in love with it ever since." It's not surprising that an architect would be drawn to Sudbrook Park. The neighborhood was designed by one of America's most famous landscape architects, Frederick Law Olmsted Sr., the man behind New York's Central Park.
NEWS
February 5, 2004
On Tuesday, February 3, 2004, FANNIE GINSBURG (nee Podolsky), beloved wife of the late Daniel Ginsburg, devoted mother of Bill Ginsburg of Balto., MD, dear mother-in-law of Suzanne Ginsburg, devoted sister of the late, Raymond Podolsky, Morris Munsey, Edward Podolsky and Bessie Cramer, loving grandmother of Steven and Marcy Ginsburg, Ellen Ginsburg, loving great-grandmother of Michael and Lauren Ginsburg. Also survived by loving nieces, nephews and dear friends. Services and interment will be held at Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane on Thursday, February 5 at 3:30 P.M. Please omit flowers.
NEWS
August 21, 2003
T. Newell Cox Jr., a retired vice president of Baltimore contracting firm Concord Associates Inc., died of cancer Tuesday at his home in Sudbrook Park. He was 79. Mr. Cox was born and raised at 722 Howard Road in Sudbrook Park. Except for a brief time when he was first married, he spent the rest of his life in a house next door at 724 Howard Road. After graduating in 1940 from St. Paul's School for Boys, he went to work for Consolidated Engineering Co. Inc. He enlisted in the Army in 1944 and served in Europe with the 407th Infantry Division.
NEWS
June 21, 2003
Marjorie L. Katzenberg, a homemaker and artist, died Wednesday of cancer at Brightwood Center in Lutherville. The Pikesville resident was 78. Born Marjorie Levi in Baltimore, she was raised in Sudbrook Park, Mount Washington and Owings Mills. She was a 1944 Park School graduate and earned a diploma in textile design at the Moore College of Art in Philadelphia. She also received a bachelor of science degree from what is now Towson University in 1979. Mrs. Katzenberg designed patterns for materials used in the manufacture of women's clothing in New York City in the 1940s.
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