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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 13, 2012
Update: The New York City Board of Health voted unanimously to require parents to sign consent forms before their kids can have Jewish ritual circumcision. Read the New York Times account here.   A group of Johns Hopkins ethicists have written a letter to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg supporting a proposed amendment to require written consent for circumcisions that include an orthodox Jewish practice some say leads to to herpes. The New York City Board of Health has proposed the amendment and could vote on the issue today.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 13, 2012
Update: The New York City Board of Health voted unanimously to require parents to sign consent forms before their kids can have Jewish ritual circumcision. Read the New York Times account here.   A group of Johns Hopkins ethicists have written a letter to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg supporting a proposed amendment to require written consent for circumcisions that include an orthodox Jewish practice some say leads to to herpes. The New York City Board of Health has proposed the amendment and could vote on the issue today.
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NEWS
June 5, 2001
Summer is nearly here, and the goggles are everywhere some considerations when you buy: Besides improving underwater vision, goggles help keep chlorine and unknown "gunk' from your eyes, reduce glare and help prevent infection. Water is kept out by suction or closed-cell foam. Which type you buy comes down to personal preference. The foam tends not to leave temporary red marks around your eyes; suction types, fitted properly, may keep water out a bit better. Try to make the suction type stick against your eye sockets briefly without the strap to help ensure good fit. Lens color - clear, blue, gray, smoke, etc. Most lenses these days block UV light; that's important.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 3, 2007
Last weekend I puffed up with pride after successfully completing a daunting domestic task - changing a light bulb. Before I endure a blizzard of jokes about how many journalists it takes to change a light bulb - two, one to screw it in and another to screw it up; or just one, he grabs the bulb and waits for the world to revolve around him - let me point out that this was not a mere 60-watt bulb removed from a living room lamp. Instead, it was a floodlight, tucked in a recessed fixture, embedded in a soaring ceiling.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 3, 2007
Last weekend I puffed up with pride after successfully completing a daunting domestic task - changing a light bulb. Before I endure a blizzard of jokes about how many journalists it takes to change a light bulb - two, one to screw it in and another to screw it up; or just one, he grabs the bulb and waits for the world to revolve around him - let me point out that this was not a mere 60-watt bulb removed from a living room lamp. Instead, it was a floodlight, tucked in a recessed fixture, embedded in a soaring ceiling.
NEWS
December 10, 1993
FIVE years ago, a woman tried to revive her husband with a toilet plunger -- and succeeded.The man had been suffering from a heart attack and the frantic wife, not knowing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, grabbed for the first thing she saw. It paid off. Researchers from the American Heart Association now report that a suction devise inspired by the plunger seems twice as effective as standard CPR.Dr. Kelly Tucker of the cardiology department with the University of Florida says that of 53 hospitalized patients suffering from cardiac arrest, 24 percent of the patients who received suction-enhanced CPR survived while only 11 percent survived with standard CPR practices.
NEWS
December 4, 1996
PERHAPS THE MOST frightening thing about parenthood is knowing that, no matter how vigilantly one tries to anticipate the dangers that can befall a child, there will always be traps unheard of and unforeseen.Who would have thought, for example, that something as seemingly innocuous as the drain in a child's wading pool can be as lethal as an unlocked medicine cabinet?We know now to take precautions, only because the trap sprung last year on little William Boulay of Glen Burnie, now 4. Presumably intrigued by the suction, William sat on the drain in a motel wading pool.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 11, 1991
WITH THE holidays over, it's time to assess a disturbing trend in child behavior which seems a particularly sad by-product of the bland, take-no-risk '90s.It involves a toy bow and arrows left for my 8-year-old by Santa Claus, who, it seems to me, was having an off day when he loaded this baby onto his sleigh.On the surface, the bow and arrows seem harmless enough. (Then again, so does a Claymore mine.)The bow, which was made in Hong Kong (there's an upset), has a firing range of about, oh, four feet if you're lucky and five feet only if the jet stream is at your back.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1994
The National Aquarium is making preparations to free the young pygmy sperm whale that was rescued Thanksgiving Day on a New Jersey beach, sick from swallowing plastic debris in the Atlantic.Within a few weeks, aquarium mammalogists and veterinarians are hoping to fly the female whale to Florida on a Navy plane and release her in the ocean -- with a radio transmitter attached to the dorsal fin, and perhaps a "critter-cam" mounted by suction cups on her back."Critter-cam" is the brainchild of Greg Marshall, a National Geographic cinemagrapher from Falls Church, Va., who since 1986 has been experimenting with video technology to see the watery world from the viewpoint of its inhabitants -- such as loggerhead turtles, sharks and elephant seals.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | September 1, 2002
Ashes to ashes, dust to dust. When prying a den's sofa free from the wall behind, this grim summation of the human experience is fully understood. Here lies family history in all its multi-layered ignominy: kitty hair, petrified human skin cells, a less than sweet-smelling gym sock, and the still vibrant constellation of Froot Loops that little Andy spilled there last April. To err is human; to vacuum, divine. And soon enough, when the Dyson DC07 RootCyclone vacuum cleaner is launched in the United States, the job will be a whole lot holier.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2005
It was a standard 30-minute hospital procedure, but it grabbed the world's attention overnight. Doctors in Rome performed a tracheotomy yesterday on Pope John Paul II - making an incision in his neck below the larynx and inserting a tube that can provide oxygen to his lungs and help clear fluids or other obstructions from his airway. The 84-year-old pontiff reportedly was breathing with the help of a mechanical ventilator. A Vatican spokesman described yesterday's procedure as "elective" and said the surgery had had a "positive" outcome.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and By Erika Hobbs,Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
The circular bruises on Gwyneth Paltrow's back above her strapless dress at a movie premiere this summer have sparked a new interest in an obscure Chinese acupuncture technique. The therapy, called cupping, was reportedly used by Paltrow to treat back pain. "Now patients are calling me, asking, 'What is this thing called cupping?' No one ever asked about it before," said Lixing Lao, an acupuncturist and associate professor at the University of Maryland's Center for Integrative Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | September 1, 2002
Ashes to ashes, dust to dust. When prying a den's sofa free from the wall behind, this grim summation of the human experience is fully understood. Here lies family history in all its multi-layered ignominy: kitty hair, petrified human skin cells, a less than sweet-smelling gym sock, and the still vibrant constellation of Froot Loops that little Andy spilled there last April. To err is human; to vacuum, divine. And soon enough, when the Dyson DC07 RootCyclone vacuum cleaner is launched in the United States, the job will be a whole lot holier.
NEWS
June 5, 2001
Summer is nearly here, and the goggles are everywhere some considerations when you buy: Besides improving underwater vision, goggles help keep chlorine and unknown "gunk' from your eyes, reduce glare and help prevent infection. Water is kept out by suction or closed-cell foam. Which type you buy comes down to personal preference. The foam tends not to leave temporary red marks around your eyes; suction types, fitted properly, may keep water out a bit better. Try to make the suction type stick against your eye sockets briefly without the strap to help ensure good fit. Lens color - clear, blue, gray, smoke, etc. Most lenses these days block UV light; that's important.
NEWS
December 4, 1996
PERHAPS THE MOST frightening thing about parenthood is knowing that, no matter how vigilantly one tries to anticipate the dangers that can befall a child, there will always be traps unheard of and unforeseen.Who would have thought, for example, that something as seemingly innocuous as the drain in a child's wading pool can be as lethal as an unlocked medicine cabinet?We know now to take precautions, only because the trap sprung last year on little William Boulay of Glen Burnie, now 4. Presumably intrigued by the suction, William sat on the drain in a motel wading pool.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1994
The National Aquarium is making preparations to free the young pygmy sperm whale that was rescued Thanksgiving Day on a New Jersey beach, sick from swallowing plastic debris in the Atlantic.Within a few weeks, aquarium mammalogists and veterinarians are hoping to fly the female whale to Florida on a Navy plane and release her in the ocean -- with a radio transmitter attached to the dorsal fin, and perhaps a "critter-cam" mounted by suction cups on her back."Critter-cam" is the brainchild of Greg Marshall, a National Geographic cinemagrapher from Falls Church, Va., who since 1986 has been experimenting with video technology to see the watery world from the viewpoint of its inhabitants -- such as loggerhead turtles, sharks and elephant seals.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2005
It was a standard 30-minute hospital procedure, but it grabbed the world's attention overnight. Doctors in Rome performed a tracheotomy yesterday on Pope John Paul II - making an incision in his neck below the larynx and inserting a tube that can provide oxygen to his lungs and help clear fluids or other obstructions from his airway. The 84-year-old pontiff reportedly was breathing with the help of a mechanical ventilator. A Vatican spokesman described yesterday's procedure as "elective" and said the surgery had had a "positive" outcome.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and By Erika Hobbs,Special to the Sun | August 29, 2004
The circular bruises on Gwyneth Paltrow's back above her strapless dress at a movie premiere this summer have sparked a new interest in an obscure Chinese acupuncture technique. The therapy, called cupping, was reportedly used by Paltrow to treat back pain. "Now patients are calling me, asking, 'What is this thing called cupping?' No one ever asked about it before," said Lixing Lao, an acupuncturist and associate professor at the University of Maryland's Center for Integrative Medicine in Baltimore.
NEWS
December 10, 1993
FIVE years ago, a woman tried to revive her husband with a toilet plunger -- and succeeded.The man had been suffering from a heart attack and the frantic wife, not knowing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, grabbed for the first thing she saw. It paid off. Researchers from the American Heart Association now report that a suction devise inspired by the plunger seems twice as effective as standard CPR.Dr. Kelly Tucker of the cardiology department with the University of Florida says that of 53 hospitalized patients suffering from cardiac arrest, 24 percent of the patients who received suction-enhanced CPR survived while only 11 percent survived with standard CPR practices.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 11, 1991
WITH THE holidays over, it's time to assess a disturbing trend in child behavior which seems a particularly sad by-product of the bland, take-no-risk '90s.It involves a toy bow and arrows left for my 8-year-old by Santa Claus, who, it seems to me, was having an off day when he loaded this baby onto his sleigh.On the surface, the bow and arrows seem harmless enough. (Then again, so does a Claymore mine.)The bow, which was made in Hong Kong (there's an upset), has a firing range of about, oh, four feet if you're lucky and five feet only if the jet stream is at your back.
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