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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Larry Carson and Baltimore Sun reporters | January 21, 2010
The majority of the poor in the Baltimore region now live in the city's suburbs for the first time, while the poverty rate in the city has declined, a new study has found. The changing geography of poverty here reflects a national trend, and argues for a more regional strategy on issues ranging from social safety nets to mass transit, the study concludes. "The notion of poverty as primarily an urban problem is officially outdated," said Elizabeth Kneebone, co-author of a report released Wednesday by the Brookings Institution in Washington.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Ann and Dominic Wiker loved life in their Federal Hill home. As a professional couple in their 30s, the neighborhood was ideal - they could walk to most attractions, shops and restaurants. It seemed there was always something fun going on outside their door. Then parenthood happened, and with it came the idea of moving to the suburbs. They would move, but they wouldn't leave Federal Hill. Nine years later, the Wikers - mom, dad, 9-year old Alex and 7-year old Tommy - have, to their delight, become a poster family for raising children in an urban environment.
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NEWS
August 5, 2013
I grew up in some of the loveliest countryside imaginable in northern Baltimore County. Yet I've been a committed and proud Baltimore City resident since 1987. To me the suburbs are a bore and designed exclusively for cars. Prolonged exposure to suburban environs produces mind-numbing ennui. Every suburb looks the same whether you live in Maryland, Arizona or North Carolina. You can move further out from the city, but then you have to worry about being surrounded by McMansions - which is why that lovely countryside in northern Baltimore County is not so lovely anymore.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 15, 2014
The killing of a young black man by a police officer inĀ Ferguson, Mo., and the subsequent military-style police response to protests has illuminated two very disturbing phenomena. One is older than our republic -- racial prejudice -- and the other is relatively new -- the militarization of America's cops. Generally, I have great sympathy for police. They get stuck dealing with all the bad consequences of our shameful failure to deal with numerous social ills, from mental health to poverty.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Less than two weeks after a young black bear was fatally injured by a car on the Beltway near Lutherville, state wildlife officials are tracking another bruin last spotted Wednesday in Cockeysville. "I suspect this guy dropped down from Pennsylvania along the Susquehanna River," said Harry Spiker, a bear biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. "This bear is probably wishing he hadn't come this way." Although Maryland's black bears aren't known to breed farther east than Frederick County, these springtime sojourns — sometimes more than 100 miles — by young male bears have become annual events.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
A freeze watch is in effect for the Baltimore suburbs Friday night into Saturday, with temperatures potentially reaching the 20s or 30s. The National Weather Service's Baltimore/Washington office issued the watch Thursday afternoon. The advisory cautions of a risk to unprotected vegetation vulnerable to freezing. The watch is in effect in northern Baltimore County and Harford, Howard and Carroll counties. It extends further west to Montgomery, Frederick, Washington and Allegany counties.
NEWS
December 1, 1993
The suburban security blanket, like the one Linus totes around in the "Peanuts" comic strip, seems to fray with each passing news item:Food pantries note increased demand in the suburbs, particularly in affluent Howard County . . . Panhandling more evident along suburban shopping strips. "It's safer," panhandlers say. . . . Retired executive shot through his living room window in Baltimore County's wealthy Green Spring Valley . . . Baltimore County announces heightened security to protect holiday shopping mall crowds.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
Thank you for Jamie Smith Hopkins front page story on the growth of poverty in suburbs across Maryland ("Poor people in Balto.'s suburbs outnumber those in city," May 21). The article is must reading for policymakers, civic groups, faith-based leaders and everyone who is concerned about the current and future well-being of our state. As Ms. Hopkins notes, many of the poor in the suburbs have jobs, even full-time jobs, yet they live below the official poverty level of $23,000 year for a family of four.
NEWS
By TRB | April 16, 1993
Washington. -- The Clinton administration says it's intent on ''inventing government.'' Vice President Al Gore was on television a few days ago babbling about ''this revolutionary new idea'' of making the government ''customer-friendly and customer-driven.''But if Mr. Clinton and Mr. Gore are serious about reinventing government, there is a genuinely revolutionary idea they might try: Abolish the suburbs.This is a serious suggestion. David Rusk, formerly the mayor of Albuquerque, N.M., makes the case in his new book, ''Cities Without Suburbs.
NEWS
May 11, 1994
Two years ago, in the throes of the recession, the suburbs that ring Baltimore cut back or even cut out making their fair share contributions to cultural institutions that are based in the city, but that benefit the entire region.Now, with the economy brighter, many of these suburban governments say they have restored contributions to the Baltimore attractions that so many of their residents patronize.If only that were the whole truth.The suburban governments have restored some of the cuts made during the recession, but their contributions are still way below 1990-92 levels, when the counties as a group pledged to treat a dozen or so major city-based institutions as the regional jewels they are. All of these counties sell city culture as an amenity when they try to lure new business, yet the suburbs still seem to view these stipends more as goodwill gifts than as a responsibility to the region's educational and economic well-being.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
Twelve years ago, when the General Assembly was debating the enactment of the Thornton school funding formula that has done so much to support the advances of Baltimore's schools in recent years, the city's delegation in Annapolis included 10 senators and 29 delegates. Among them were the chairs of the budget committees in both the House and the Senate, plus a number of other committee chairs and top leaders in both chambers. During the next General Assembly term, the legislature is due to revisit the Thornton formula, but thanks to population losses and the sharp curtailment at court order of districts that cross the city-county line, Baltimore's delegation will have six senators (only five of whom will live in the city)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
At 16, Dorant Wells has experienced the complexities of what Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark school desegregation ruling, has wrought: He attended a middle school full of students of different colors and nationalities, but one where he sometimes felt there were lower expectations for black students. Now at his nearly all African-American high school, Milford Mill Academy in Baltimore County, he sees value in the special character of the school, while acknowledging he may be less prepared to enter a diverse world.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 11, 2014
One day in February 2000, I sat in a police car on Poplar Grove Street in West Baltimore to observe a reverse sting: Instead of attempting to buy heroin from dealers, undercover officers were offering to sell it to users. They cleared out the regular salesmen, took over their corners and waited for the customers to arrive. The police arrested 53 people that day, including the daughter of a prominent contractor and a fellow who lived in an upscale city neighborhood. Almost all of the other heroin addicts had driven in from the suburbs - from Cockeysville, Gaithersburg, Essex, Woodlawn, Marriottsville, Crownsville, Jessup, Ellicott City, Linthicum and Columbia.
NEWS
February 9, 2014
The last mayoral election in Baltimore featured a spirited debate about a variety of ideas for aggressive reductions in the city's sky-high property tax rate. The winning candidate, though, was the one who called those ideas unrealistic and advocated a gradualist approach that left the basic structure of the city's property tax system intact. To her credit, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has followed through and proposed a comprehensive 10-year financial plan to reduce costs, diversify revenue streams and cut property taxes.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
I cringe every time the local news comes on because the first 10 minutes or so typically reports how many people have been shot, stabbed, raped or beaten. If it bleeds, it leads ( "Three die in Columbia mall shooting," Jan. 27). When multiple shootings happen in Baltimore City, the mayor and police chief give lip service for the 15-second sound bite, and we never hear about those victims again. But let some kid open fire at a mall, college or school, and it's wall-to-wall coverage with special live teams in the field, dramatic music and calls for stricter gun control.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
A winter weather advisory was briefly issued Tuesday afternoon, with a mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain expected in northern suburbs, but was canceled withing a few hours. The advisory applied to Carroll, northern Baltimore and Harford counties. Little accumulation of snow was reported, but there was a chance some light icing could occur, according to the National Weather Service. For the rest of the region, flurries and/or rain were possible, with temperatures in the upper 30s to lower 40s. Cold and windy conditions are forecast Wednesday, with highs around 40 degrees and lows around 30 degrees, with wind chills in the 20s and 30s. Skies are forecast to mostly clear out. Sunshine and warming temperatures are forecast Thursday, with highs in the mid-40s and lows in the upper 30s. Highs could reach the mid-50s Friday and Saturday under cloudy skies, with chances for showers Saturday.
NEWS
May 7, 1994
For most of his term in office, Baltimore County Executive Roger Hayden has harped on the theme that should be a pillar of his bid for re-election: reviving the county's older communities.Rejuvenating the county's oldest neighborhoods, and in turn discouraging further sprawl into the countryside, isn't simply a good tack for Baltimore County. It's in the best interests of orderly regional growth, the health of Chesapeake Bay and the state's pocketbook.The out-migration of the past 40 years -- from city to suburb to exurbs -- must be slowed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Ryleigh's Oyster has expanded, and for that Baltimore County should be thankful. Ryleigh's is a big name in Federal Hill, where it stands out as a slightly more sophisticated dining and drinking option in a sea of crazy bars more focused on volume than quality. In early November, Ryleigh's owners opened a second location, dubbed Ryleigh's Oyster Hunt Valley (though it's technically in Timonium, in the Padonia Road location locals call "that place that used to be Gibby's"). So how does this downtown restaurant translate in the county?
NEWS
By Barbara Samuels | October 15, 2013
Just before the government shut down, the Census Bureau released updated income and poverty data that highlight the impact of the Great Recession and nascent recovery. Not surprisingly, poverty has increased across the board, in both cities and suburbs, as a result of the recession. But one finding has been held out as a surprise: Brookings Institution researcher Elizabeth Kneebone's point that poverty is increasing faster in the nation's suburbs than in its cities. While true, her finding must be read in context, especially here in Baltimore, where our suburbs have fared much better than the national trend and our city has been hit harder than other cities.
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