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NEWS
March 31, 1994
It was a scene that only suburbia could appreciate: A gymnasium packed full of animated parents arguing before the Harford County school board on why their children should not be made to attend a brand new school.The scene at Bel Air's Ring Factory Elementary School the other night was surreal, bizarre and maybe a bit selfish against the backdrop of Baltimore City's horrendous school problems. The Harford forum was basically a local school boundary dispute, but the emotions of 250 people who came out on a rainy night, some carrying placards or wearing buttons in support of their causes, belied the security so often associated with suburban life.
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NEWS
October 13, 2013
In the 1950s, Americans regarded the suburbs as gateways to middle-class prosperity. Highways, the GI Bill and the Federal Housing Administration all helped fuel the growth of a new residential frontier for the Greatest Generation, and millions of Americans took advantage of the opportunity they represented to leave the cares of city life behind. But in the 60 years since then, the reality of suburban living has changed. The tree-lined developments with spacious lawns and a car (or two)
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NEWS
By Mary C. Curtis | November 9, 1999
HAVE YOU hacked your way through the thicket of hype surrounding "American Beauty" I did. I actually saw it, and I was under-whelmed. Yes, it is a good film, with some great performances. But to read the reviews, you would think it's a revelation, this searing dissection of the sterility of suburban life.The territory has been mined before, in so many films from "Stepford Wives" to "Ordinary People." "American Beauty" takes it up several notches. Now we have "Extraordinarily Weird People," from the caricature portrait of frigid Mom to the beyond-frustrated, spiritually dead Dad. I like Kevin Spacey, but do I need to see him masturbate not once, but twice I get it!
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Call it wildlife tourism in reverse. As spring turns into summer, young black bears hit the road, and in recent years it seems a few turn up on the outskirts of Baltimore, ambling across manicured lawns, rummaging through trash cans and raiding bird feeders. A bear visited northern Baltimore County last week, stirring up the Jacksonville community when it was sighted near an elementary school and then in a resident's yard. There were bear sightings last weekend in Harford County, and two Aberdeen men on Wednesday were the latest to report having seen one in Susquehanna State Park.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
A lot of people think nothing interesting happens in suburbia, but I can offer proof to the contrary. For example, just last week someone left a Pyrex baking dish at my home and I had to do some extensive sleuthing to discover its owner. Of course I jest. Suburbia is more than the stereotypical land of barbecue grill, yard, job title and student SAT-score one-upmanship! It's a place where new parents can meet at library story hour, enjoy a feeling of community around a ball field or hang out on summer nights in the driveway after work, chatting with people who just might turn out to be lifelong friends.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | May 27, 1997
On Friday evenings, John Mauro walks north from his Light Street real estate office to that splendid mecca of South Baltimore culture, the Cross Street Market. Here, he glances one way and sees Lutherville. It's maybe two feet away. He glances )) another way: Ellicott City, same distance. And another: Towson, or maybe Pikesville, close enough for a little neighborhood small talk.Every Friday night and Saturday at the market, around Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood, there arrive the youth of suburbia, hundreds of 'em in their 20s and 30s, hungering for the raw clams and the steamed shrimp, and the microbrew beers and the sushi, and maybe for something else.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 6, 2005
HERE'S A word you probably don't want to hear if you live in suburbia and have a deer problem and county officials are kicking around ways to control that deer problem: sharpshooters. Is it me? Am I being too squeamish here? Sharpshooters? To control the deer in Baltimore County? Look, I live in Baltimore County. And I live in a neighborhood where the deer problem ranges from Mild Nuisance to Deer Summer Jam 2005, depending on the time of year. You talk about brazen - our deer will practically come up and shake your hand and introduce themselves.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
As chairman of Ryland Corp., Roger Schipke's weekdays begin with a reverse commute to Columbia in his tan Lexus. Ryland's bread and butter may be the construction of new homes in suburbia, but Mr. Schipke loves living in downtown Baltimore.Not long after Mr. Schipke took over as chairman and chief executive of Ryland, he and his wife, Jackie, bought a three-bedroom condo at Harbor Court Towers in the Inner Harbor. He relishes the fact that the condo lets the couple walk to city attractions ranging from their favorite Greek and Italian restaurants to the new baseball stadium.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 27, 1993
Architects have loved neo-traditional suburban developments like Kentlands since before anyone built any. But when an auditorium full of architects, planners and builders got together at the Maryland Institute of Art 10 days ago, they clashed over the bottom-line question: Will anyone buy it?That question is highlighted by the fact that Kentlands was taken over by its lender, Chevy Chase Federal Savings and Loan, in 1991. But Andres Duany, the Miami architect and neo-traditional suburbia guru who served as a consultant to Kentlands developer Joseph Alfrandre, insisted that Kentlands' financial failure was a fluke.
NEWS
November 9, 1996
THE MOOD IN Maryland's suburbia -- the home of soccer moms and angry white males -- still seems fragile and distrustful, in spite of President Clinton's re-election Tuesday.Indeed, Mr. Clinton ran more competitively in this state's broad and burgeoning belt of tract housing and strip malls than he did when he captured the presidency in 1992.He also fared better than the results of the 1994 state election would have indicated when a fellow Democrat, Gov. Parris Glendening, lost all but the three most urban jurisdictions -- Baltimore City and Montgomery and Prince George's counties.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
Mention the war on drugs, and most people conjure up images of poor inner-city neighborhoods terrorized by desperate addicts and violent drug gangs. But addiction isn't just big-city problem. Across the country, rural and suburban communities are waging their own quiet struggle against the scourge of drug abuse. And as Harford County officials have recently been forced to acknowledge, it's becoming an increasingly uphill battle. At a bail hearing this month for a 42-year-old Aberdeen man accused of distributing illegal prescription drugs, Assistant State's Attorney Diane Adkins-Topin told the judge that "the number one problem drug in Harford County is now Oxycontin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
For some, the sight of a faceless garage or a squat chain store or a long stretch of tract housing barely registers; there's just nothing unusual about such things. For artist Sofia Silva, they mean a lot. And, once framed by her camera lens, they are imbued with provocative power. Nearly a dozen of Silva's photographs form an exhibit, "Meditations on the Landscape of Desire," one of two solo shows on display at C. Grimaldis Gallery (the other show features intriguing sculptural pieces by Lu Zhang)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
The Red Parrot Asian Bistro in Hanover - the community in Anne Arundel County, not Pennsylvania - has good food in a bland setting. It is a restaurant that specializes in Southeast Asian fare. The setting, a glassy corner building in a mall just off the Baltimore- Washington Parkway, is less than uplifting. The service, young men and women clad in black, is spotty. The fare, however, has taste and substance. Red Parrot is one of the tenants of a shopping center that has sprung up on Dorchester Boulevard and Arundel Mills Boulevard, not far from the mother of all malls, Arundel Mills.
NEWS
July 3, 2010
News item: A judge on Thursday denied bail to suspected Russian spies Richard and Cindy Murphy, whose arrests shocked neighbors in suburban Montclair, N.J. Cindy Murphy, who commuted to her financial job in New York, was admired for her gardening and baking, while her husband was a stay-at-home dad known for making his two daughters' lunches and walking them to the school bus. They are two of the 10 alleged spies arrested this week who...
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
A lot of people think nothing interesting happens in suburbia, but I can offer proof to the contrary. For example, just last week someone left a Pyrex baking dish at my home and I had to do some extensive sleuthing to discover its owner. Of course I jest. Suburbia is more than the stereotypical land of barbecue grill, yard, job title and student SAT-score one-upmanship! It's a place where new parents can meet at library story hour, enjoy a feeling of community around a ball field or hang out on summer nights in the driveway after work, chatting with people who just might turn out to be lifelong friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric Arnesen and Eric Arnesen,Tribune Newspapers | April 26, 2009
Levittown: Two Families, One Tycoon, and the Fight for Civil Rights in America's Legendary Suburb By David Kushner Walker & Co. / 256 pages / $26 More than a half-century before our current disaster in the housing market, the United States confronted a very different sort of housing crisis. During the Great Depression of the 1930s and the economic boom of World War II, few private homes had been constructed. With demobilization after World War II, vast numbers of military veterans and their families, flush with cash and G.I. Bill-backed mortgages, were desperate for housing.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 1997
PLANO, Texas -- This is a great place to raise children. Except when they die. The golden buckle of the Sun Belt, its subdivisions and business parks swelling with white-collar migrants, Plano is by almost every measure the apex of educated suburbia -- clean streets, big houses, 113 lighted ball fields.With just two or three murders annually, this Dallas-area boom town of nearly 200,000 is Texas' safest city -- and one of America's Top 10. The Children's Environmental Index calls it the nation's fourth most child-friendly community, based on socioeconomic data such as dropout rates and household incomes.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 20, 2009
A documentary about a mad 1960s household, Must Read After My Death, constructed out of tape, Dictaphone recordings and home movies, premieres theatrically today in New York and digitally everywhere via its distributor's Web site, giganticdigital.com. The company charges $2.99 for a three-day "ticket," good for any number of viewings, and promises to stream the film in any quality up to high definition. Viewers will be able to adjust the image according to what looks right for their home screen.
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