Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSuburbanites
IN THE NEWS

Suburbanites

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 30, 2012
I suggest that my fellow Baltimore residents take off their gloves and defend our beloved city against the onslaught of unjust criticism by smug suburbanites. My family enjoys a lifestyle that could never be duplicated in the suburbs. While you enjoy your perceived safety, you live a life in a boring monoculture filled with chain stores and restaurants. You endanger your lives on a daily basis driving long distances for work, school and entertainment. Your children spend hours in the car staring at the headrest or some electronic device.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 1, 2012
The mayhem that took place downtown onSt. Patrick's Daywas certainly reprehensible, and while Pat McDonough wants to demagogue the issue and race-bait, the mayhem was far from limited to downtown and one race. In Federal Hill and Canton, the situation reached near-riot levels with drunken 20-somethings wreaking havoc on residents with the complicity of wealthy bar owners. Residents had to endure vandalism, public drunkenness, public urination, car accidents, and even assault with little or no protection from the city.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | March 30, 1997
MY HUSBAND seriously threatened our marriage the other night when he suggested that my family touched off suburban sprawl. He might as well have accused the Kennedys of Republican leanings.I'm not much into genealogy, but I'm told my father's father's people got off the boat in the early 1700s, settling in what became northern Baltimore and Carroll counties, where they have farmed ever since. My father's mother's people came over a century later and farmed the same area.''We didn't 'sprawl' here, we've been here,'' I insisted.
NEWS
May 30, 2012
I suggest that my fellow Baltimore residents take off their gloves and defend our beloved city against the onslaught of unjust criticism by smug suburbanites. My family enjoys a lifestyle that could never be duplicated in the suburbs. While you enjoy your perceived safety, you live a life in a boring monoculture filled with chain stores and restaurants. You endanger your lives on a daily basis driving long distances for work, school and entertainment. Your children spend hours in the car staring at the headrest or some electronic device.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 18, 1992
As New Hampshire goes, so goes Vermont.The one sure winner is Buchanan. Anything over 10 percent and his lecture fee soars.Palestinians murdered Israeli soldiers, so Israeli planes raked Lebanese Hezbollah, who rocketed Israeli villages. Everyone supposedly taught everyone else a lesson. So why aren't they wiser?Leading economists are against all tax proposals, and no wonder. They were drafted to help the election, not the economy.Baltimore County Library closed branches so that suburbanites can experience city living.
NEWS
July 23, 2001
State faces needs more pressing than a better Oriole Park Maryland's public mental health system is facing a $30 million budget shortfall for the fiscal year that began July 1. I took mass transit to Artscape. And while we did not have as many problems as others did, I want to ask that next year the organizers try to encourage the state to open the Metro subway on Sunday. When so many people are encouraged to take mass transit to the festival, it is funny that the only option available on Sunday is the light rail.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | December 1, 1994
DOWNTOWN REAL estate is losing value so fast that the city may soon be razing not just the five public housing high rises at Lafayette Courts but also One Charles Center, the Candler Building, Signet Tower and a few other skyline symbols of our decline.And so the downward spiral continues. And so it will continue as long as Baltimore City remains Baltimore City.As attentive Sun Readers and urbanologists the world over know, I have been advocating "turning in the charter" for well over a decade.
NEWS
June 21, 1999
Arts emphasis could help city thriveWe would like to elaborate on The Sun's coverage of the symposium, "Arts as a magnet for Baltimore" ("Lighting a fire under cultural groups," June 15).At this unprecedented gathering June 14 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, more than 350 independent artists, cultural leaders, representatives of community development organizations and business leaders came together to determine how to harness the rich, yet untapped, strength of Baltimore's cultural assets.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | February 4, 1995
At a recent breakfast, I met a couple of Baltimore city officials. They were very friendly, although I was struck by their reaction when I told them I lived in the suburbs. It was if they were archaeologists who had just stumbled upon Ice Age man and thawed him to life.''Do you like it?'' they probed in hushed tones. ''Do you know your . . . neighbors.''Their curiosity about the inner tickings of a suburbanite I found bewildering, in light of the city's attempt to win back the middle class with the aid of a federal $100 million empowerment grant.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | June 8, 1997
I WENT TO Gov. Parris Glendening's summit on ''smart growth'' in Baltimore last week largely to hear James Howard Kunstler, the patron saint of those who look at cheesy commercial strips, big-box buildings and artless housing developments and say, ''Gross. Can't we do better than this?''In the end, though, it wasn't the colorful Mr. Kunstler who left the biggest impression or said the most important things.Not that he disappointed. His books on the horrors of post-World War II development are written with an acid-dipped pen, and he talks as he writes.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
I hate to admit it. But here it is. I'm one of those county residents who rarely goes into Baltimore City. Some years ago my husband and I were traveling on Charles Street on a Sunday afternoon when we were accosted by a group of teens blocking an intersection. They dared us to run them down. When we blew the horn and inched forward, they kicked out our front headlight. As crime goes, it was minor, but I was reminded of the incident Monday when my husband suggested that we visit the Christmas display in Hampden.
NEWS
June 10, 2008
It's no secret that residents of Baltimore's neighboring counties are lured to the city by more than employment opportunities, ethnic restaurants and the occasional ballgame. City police say about 15 percent of the 20,000 drug arrests last year involved suspects from the five suburban counties; City Councilman William H. Cole IV believes the actual number who visit the city for this nefarious purpose is even higher. He introduced an ordinance yesterday to slap the out-of-town miscreants with a civil penalty of $1,000, which would be in addition to normal criminal penalties of jail time and a fine of up to $25,000.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | July 28, 2006
It's easily 95 degrees at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, and air is so thick with humidity your lungs would prefer to wring it out before breathing it in. Undaunted, Emily Green Shaw scatters straw in her garden plot to keep the weeds down, and recounts how she became the site manager for the Lake Elkhorn Community Gardens in Columbia. "I was at one of the Columbia Gardeners meetings, and no one else would say `yes'" she said. It's not as if Shaw, 30, has copious free time. Trained as a medical illustrator, Shaw is a simulation specialist with Laerdal and travels internationally teaching medical procedures with software she helped develop.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2005
Ruth Cronheim and her husband won't be doing much driving after they move this fall into their new condominium at Clipper Mill in Baltimore. That's because the retired couple plan whenever they can to hop on the light rail trains that stop in front of their development. "It goes right to Camden Yards, and it goes right to BWI," Cronheim, 65, said of the rail line. "And if we get sick, there's the Metro we can transfer to that goes to Johns Hopkins [Hospital]." Avoiding the rising cost of driving was a big factor in the couple's decision to buy a home in the city near mass transit, but that isn't true for many others - at least not yet. The latest increase in gas prices this summer doesn't seem to have driven many Americans to put "For Sale" signs in the front yards of their roomy suburban homes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2005
As Howard County's suburbanites press for slower growth, rural western county landowners are pushing hard to stave off tighter residential zoning restrictions, putting a spotlight on growing development tensions. One vivid illustration: the western county farmers who lined up 20 big tractors in front of Glenelg High School on Tuesday night as more than 200 rural landowners told Marsha L. McLaughlin, the county planning director, that proposed zoning changes would be akin to stealing the value of their land.
NEWS
By Mark B. Miller | October 30, 2002
TO THOSE of a certain age, old enough to remember Watergate but not Alan Shepard's 15-minute space romp in 1961, the Cuban missile crisis, the JFK assassination and Beatlemania, add the opening of the Jones Falls Expressway. In fact, it was toward the end of John F. Kennedy's scary face-off with Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev on Nov. 2, 1962, that the JFX fully opened for business. Motorists could access a stretch of it (south of Cold Spring Lane) a little earlier, but that first Friday in November four decades ago marked the official first-stage completion of this twisting ribbon of concrete that stretched from the city-county line to Guilford Avenue.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | September 5, 1992
Jenny Swartwood and William Mason are part of the new electoral majority. She is a Republican. He is a Democrat. Both are suburbanites. They could well hold the key to the presidential election.This November, for the first time, most votes are expected to be cast in the suburbs. That fact is shaping the campaigns of both George Bush and Bill Clinton, and defining the political issues for 1992 and beyond.It has made the middle-class agenda the core of both campaigns. The economy, jobs, taxes, health care and the environment are the shared concerns of suburbanites and the buzz issues for both parties.
NEWS
November 6, 1993
These are not happy days for Washington's Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly.The luster of a bright new face which excited the capital city when she was overwhelmingly elected three years ago has been dimmed by a series of setbacks. Some are of her own doing, and others are the sort of woes that afflict most big-city mayors. The mistakes she has made are political blunders, the kind a more experienced office-holder might not have made. But they hurt, and they are not offset by the sort of achievements Mrs. Kelly promised in her uphill campaign to succeed the discredited Marion Barry.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2002
Rupinder Oberoi didn't need to watch CNN yesterday afternoon to make the connection, although the television news was on all day in the living room of his parents' Linthicum apartment. He didn't need to read the disturbing lead story in the folded-up newspaper down the hall, either. The details of Monday night's shooting - the 12th in a series that has left nine dead and two wounded in suburban Washington - are eerily similar to his own. One shot. One victim. One bullet. No witnesses.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Democrat C. Vernon Gray has held Howard County's District 2 County Council seat for so long that county Democrats may feel the east Columbia-Jessup district is theirs for the taking. But two Republicans, Ananta Hejeebu and Raymond J. Bly, are also competing to replace the five-term veteran. Three Democrats - Calvin B. Ball III, David A. Rakes and Michelle Williams are contending for their party's nomination. The two Republicans offer GOP voters a very distinct choice. Bly, 52, is a maverick - a longtime Jessup used-appliance dealer who sees himself as representative of the "mom-and-pop," older commercial culture in the U.S. 1 corridor - the one county officials are hoping will give way to more upscale businesses.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.