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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 31, 1992
Last night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program in Meyerhoff Hall showed some of the strengths and weaknesses of its guest conductor, Hugh Wolff.The weaknesses were apparent when he led Haydn's Symphony No. 84. Even though he has just recorded all of the composer's "Paris" symphonies with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra (of which he is music director), Wolff demonstrated what seemed a rudimentary conducting technique. His left and right hands seemed tied together -- the left mirroring exactly what the right was doing -- and there were times whenthe young conductor's leaps threatened to turn him into an unguided missile.
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NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | April 2, 2006
Two words commonly used to describe the Baltimore City public school system - fairly or unfairly - are "troubled" and "beleaguered." And in this election year, the performance of Maryland's fourth-largest but most-visible school system will play a major role in the gubernatorial race. As Sun education reporter Sara Neufeld said, "Now more than ever, I have to examine the political context behind virtually every story I write, given the power struggle between the city and the state." Over the past few years the state school board has placed certain city schools under third-party control because they continually failed to meet mandated academic standards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 31, 1992
Last night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program in Meyerhoff Hall showed some of the strengths and weaknesses of its guest conductor, Hugh Wolff.The weaknesses were apparent when he led Haydn's Symphony No. 84. Even though he has just recorded all of the composer's "Paris" Symphonies with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra (of which he is music director), Wolff demonstrated what seemed a rudimentary conducting technique. His left and right hands seemed tied together -- the left mirroring exactly what the right was doing -- and there were times when the young conductor's leaps threatened to turn him into an unguided missile.
NEWS
By TOM HAMBURGER AND PETER WALLSTEN and TOM HAMBURGER AND PETER WALLSTEN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- For more than a decade, Dick Cheney has tussled with the CIA, first as secretary of defense and later as vice president. Now, that long and tortured history forms the backdrop of a federal probe into who outed an undercover agency officer - an inquiry that is centering in part on Cheney's office. Special Prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald has interviewed not only the vice president but also his chief of staff, I. Lewis Libby, and several other current and former Cheney aides as he seeks to learn who told reporters about the agent and whether anyone obstructed his inquiry.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 21, 1992
The idea of the subtext -- the notion that there is a set of meanings implied rather than explicitly stated in a literary or dramatic work -- represents depths from which the sirens sing to the best-intentioned directors and critics.Count Roger Brunyate, the brilliant director of Peabody's Opera Theatre, as their most recent victim. His production of Mozart's "The Magic Flute," which opened Thursday in Friedberg Hall, is filled with so many brilliant ideas that it sinks beneath the weight of its insights.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 2000
It may have been unseasonably warm on the streets of Baltimore last night, but things were definitely wintry inside the Meyerhoff as David Zinman conducted the Baltimore Symphony in a crisp and atmospheric performance of the Sibelius Symphony No. 6. The Sixth Symphony isn't the composer's warmest work; its mood is cool, stark and reserved, coming across like a walk through the woods just before the onset of spring. In other hands, that quality might have made the music off-putting, but Zinman found something poetic, even alluring, in the work's muted colors and stoic drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 13, 1993
Rob Weiss talks fast. The characters in his debut movie, "Amongst Friends," also talk fast, but not as fast as Weiss talks in the flesh. The words explode out in a crescendo, and he's three pages into an answer, a digression, a refinement and then a restatement of the central thesis while Joe Reporter is still trying to get the cap off his ballpoint.Weiss, Long Island born and bred, has stepped into the big time with his first film "Amongst Friends," a suburban gangster melodrama that made him the toast of the Sundance Film Festival, the darling of the slick magazines and the beloved of the film critics.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 2003
There's an unseen window at the edge of the stage, front and center, in designer David Gallo's abstract set for the play a.m. Sunday at Center Stage. Characters look out the window at significant moments in this harrowing domestic drama. But what's more significant about this invisible window is that, metaphorically speaking, it's the audience's window onto a world rarely portrayed on stage - that of a biracial middle-class family. Written by 28-year-old Jerome Hairston, a.m. Sunday was a hit at the prestigious Humana Festival of New American Plays at the Actors Theatre of Louisville in 2002.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | September 5, 1995
STATEMENT FROM Calvin Klein, Inc.(With subtext by Calvin)The message of the CK Calvin Klein Jeans current advertising campaign is that young people today, the most media savvy generation yet, have a real strength of character and independence.(The message of my jeans campaign is that young people today should have sex, lots of sex, straight-up sex, twisted sex, denim sex, multicultural sex. That's the same message I've always had. Wet shots sell dry goods. Why show clothes when you can show a body?
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 24, 1991
Richard Strauss' "Salome" is the opera for people who hate opera -- it's non-stop action, violence and lurid sex in a single 90-minute act. It's as scary and bloody as the best Brian DePalma movies and as kitschy as one by Cecil B. DeMille -- Salome's striptease leads to the beheading of John the Baptist. No wonder sopranos, conductors and record companies love it.The latest entries in the "Salome" sweepstakes come from Deutsche Grammophon and Sony Classical. The former features Giuseppe Sinopoli conducting the orchestra of the German Opera of Berlin and a cast headed by the young American soprano, Cheryl Studer; the latter has Zubin Mehta conducting the Berlin Phiharmonic and a cast that stars Eva Marton in the title role.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 2003
There's an unseen window at the edge of the stage, front and center, in designer David Gallo's abstract set for the play a.m. Sunday at Center Stage. Characters look out the window at significant moments in this harrowing domestic drama. But what's more significant about this invisible window is that, metaphorically speaking, it's the audience's window onto a world rarely portrayed on stage - that of a biracial middle-class family. Written by 28-year-old Jerome Hairston, a.m. Sunday was a hit at the prestigious Humana Festival of New American Plays at the Actors Theatre of Louisville in 2002.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2002
WACO, Texas - President Bush is welcoming the crown prince of Saudi Arabia to his ranch today. It is not so the Saudi leader can sample the Texas weather. Like many presidents before him, Bush has calculated that one of the best ways to smooth relations with another foreign leader is to escape the formal trappings of Washington and bring the leader to some casual place out of town to chat. The normally warm U.S.-Saudi relationship has fallen to its tensest point in some time, and Crown Prince Abdullah, who will arrive at Bush's 1,600-acre ranch this morning, brings with him an angry message from moderate Arab leaders: If they are to remain American allies, Bush must exert more pressure on Israel to pull out of the West Bank.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 2000
It may have been unseasonably warm on the streets of Baltimore last night, but things were definitely wintry inside the Meyerhoff as David Zinman conducted the Baltimore Symphony in a crisp and atmospheric performance of the Sibelius Symphony No. 6. The Sixth Symphony isn't the composer's warmest work; its mood is cool, stark and reserved, coming across like a walk through the woods just before the onset of spring. In other hands, that quality might have made the music off-putting, but Zinman found something poetic, even alluring, in the work's muted colors and stoic drama.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | September 5, 1995
STATEMENT FROM Calvin Klein, Inc.(With subtext by Calvin)The message of the CK Calvin Klein Jeans current advertising campaign is that young people today, the most media savvy generation yet, have a real strength of character and independence.(The message of my jeans campaign is that young people today should have sex, lots of sex, straight-up sex, twisted sex, denim sex, multicultural sex. That's the same message I've always had. Wet shots sell dry goods. Why show clothes when you can show a body?
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 22, 1995
At the end of a miserable evening, at the end of a long line of people who didn't know whether to be furious or frightened or both, who didn't know if they should keep believing in a Bolton Hill that is one of this city's treasures, who wondered aloud if the police were paying enough attention, there arrived a young woman named Melissa Temple.She had a voice trying to find its composure. She said she was there at 2 o'clock the previous morning, in the 1500 block of Park Ave., when she heard a noise and found Keith Huppert's life ebbing away after he was shot and then shot again at the end of a robbery attempt in which two 16-year-old kids on bicycles have been charged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 13, 1993
Rob Weiss talks fast. The characters in his debut movie, "Amongst Friends," also talk fast, but not as fast as Weiss talks in the flesh. The words explode out in a crescendo, and he's three pages into an answer, a digression, a refinement and then a restatement of the central thesis while Joe Reporter is still trying to get the cap off his ballpoint.Weiss, Long Island born and bred, has stepped into the big time with his first film "Amongst Friends," a suburban gangster melodrama that made him the toast of the Sundance Film Festival, the darling of the slick magazines and the beloved of the film critics.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 22, 1995
At the end of a miserable evening, at the end of a long line of people who didn't know whether to be furious or frightened or both, who didn't know if they should keep believing in a Bolton Hill that is one of this city's treasures, who wondered aloud if the police were paying enough attention, there arrived a young woman named Melissa Temple.She had a voice trying to find its composure. She said she was there at 2 o'clock the previous morning, in the 1500 block of Park Ave., when she heard a noise and found Keith Huppert's life ebbing away after he was shot and then shot again at the end of a robbery attempt in which two 16-year-old kids on bicycles have been charged.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | April 2, 2006
Two words commonly used to describe the Baltimore City public school system - fairly or unfairly - are "troubled" and "beleaguered." And in this election year, the performance of Maryland's fourth-largest but most-visible school system will play a major role in the gubernatorial race. As Sun education reporter Sara Neufeld said, "Now more than ever, I have to examine the political context behind virtually every story I write, given the power struggle between the city and the state." Over the past few years the state school board has placed certain city schools under third-party control because they continually failed to meet mandated academic standards.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 21, 1992
The idea of the subtext -- the notion that there is a set of meanings implied rather than explicitly stated in a literary or dramatic work -- represents depths from which the sirens sing to the best-intentioned directors and critics.Count Roger Brunyate, the brilliant director of Peabody's Opera Theatre, as their most recent victim. His production of Mozart's "The Magic Flute," which opened Thursday in Friedberg Hall, is filled with so many brilliant ideas that it sinks beneath the weight of its insights.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 31, 1992
Last night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program in Meyerhoff Hall showed some of the strengths and weaknesses of its guest conductor, Hugh Wolff.The weaknesses were apparent when he led Haydn's Symphony No. 84. Even though he has just recorded all of the composer's "Paris" symphonies with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra (of which he is music director), Wolff demonstrated what seemed a rudimentary conducting technique. His left and right hands seemed tied together -- the left mirroring exactly what the right was doing -- and there were times whenthe young conductor's leaps threatened to turn him into an unguided missile.
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