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NEWS
July 20, 2011
It's important to remember that ideological myths were one cause of the economic collapse, especially myths about regulating special interests. Politicians who receive money from Wall Street, the oil and gas industry and others justify the protective corporate welfare given their benefactors by invoking ideological doctrines such as those that insists that all government regulation and taxation is inherently bad. Only by leaving special interests...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A limit should be set on the time it takes to clear or dismiss a teacher accused of misconduct so that employees do not remain out of their schools for months and even years, legislators and education advocates said this week. While two legislators suggested action by the General Assembly, an education advocate said some agreement could be reached between unions and school systems on how to expedite a process that is expensive to taxpayers and detrimental to children whose classrooms are staffed by substitutes.
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NEWS
April 10, 2012
The examples of Dallas Dance's supervisory abilities given in the article "Meet Mr. Dance" (April 8) are of concern. A principal should not have to wait for a visit from a supervisor to have a sewage problem repaired or a broken card swiper fixed. Those are indications of a school system that is not responsive to the needs of the local schools. Mr. Dance has not stayed in a job long enough to gauge the success or failure of his policies. His enthusiasm and energy are welcome, but they do not compensate for his lack of experience.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
What do you call a person who has been granted the right to drive in Maryland, but has no legal right to stay in the United States ( "Raid spurs immigrants fear of driver's licenses ," Sept. 20)? Is he or she a semi-citizen? A second-class citizen? A quasi-citizen? If not an illegal immigrant, what would be a fair description? Decriminalized citizen? Once Maryland opted to license undocumented immigrants to drive, it was entirely predictable that federal immigration police would make use of the MVA database to weed out those drivers without papers.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
What do you call a person who has been granted the right to drive in Maryland, but has no legal right to stay in the United States ( "Raid spurs immigrants fear of driver's licenses ," Sept. 20)? Is he or she a semi-citizen? A second-class citizen? A quasi-citizen? If not an illegal immigrant, what would be a fair description? Decriminalized citizen? Once Maryland opted to license undocumented immigrants to drive, it was entirely predictable that federal immigration police would make use of the MVA database to weed out those drivers without papers.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
While it sounds encouraging on paper, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to open youth curfew centers in Baltimore represents a misplaced priority ( "Mayor proposes year-round curfew centers," Feb. 10). Once again, the onus is on Big Brother, not parents, to dictate how and if children in Baltimore live more enriched lives. Schools provide early morning activities as well as a breakfast and lunch. Then there are after-school programs and activities, some school-based. Do we see the enabling trend here?
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
Katie Cheng got about $50 and no respect for the recent day she spent as a substitute math teacher at MacArthur Middle School at Fort Meade, typical of the problems that have led to substitute teacher shortages throughout the metropolitan area in the past 20 years.Baltimore-area educators are trying to remedy the situation.Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties seek nominal pay raises for substitutes, hoping to attract and keep more of them. Other school districts are swelling the ranks of fill-in teachers by tapping faculty members -- teachers in their planning periods, administrators and guidance counselors.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | January 11, 2006
What is mace? And what can I use as a substitute? We can't discuss mace without talking about nutmeg. Both are products of the nutmeg tree, an evergreen native to the Moluccas, a group of islands in the Indian Ocean that are part of Indonesia. The tree is cultivated in the Caribbean as well. The nutmeg tree produces a peachlike fruit that, when ripe, splits to reveal a dark seed in a lacy, bright-red covering. The seed is nutmeg; the covering is mace. Once separated, the two spices are dried.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | October 18, 1994
Mothers everywhere ask the same question of their children )) every afternoon."What did you do at school today?"When the answer comes back, "Nothing. We had a sub," mothers roll their eyes and say simply, "Oh."We imagine that our children did, indeed, do nothing all day while in the care of a substitute teacher. Or they did worse than nothing. They were rowdy or rude. They back-talked or threw stuff. We imagine scenes right out of "The Blackboard Jungle."Why? Because that's how we behaved when we had a sub.I remember when Mrs. Frece substituted for Mr. Motley.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
As the husband of a teacher and brother-in-law of two other teachers, I have to say Dan Rodricks ' recent column ("This looks a lot like playing hooky," Nov. 13) about teacher absences is missing a big chunk of the story. The fact is the only time off teachers have available to them during the school year are sick days and two or three personal days. They don't get three weeks or more of paid vacation like a lot of people do in their jobs. This is the only time available to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Dozens of Baltimore classrooms could be staffed by long-term substitutes when school begins in less than two weeks, a plan drawing concern particularly because special-education students — who struggle the most academically — could be the largest group affected. System leaders and local advocates are expressing reservations about the plan to fill some of the system's 190 teacher vacancies. David Stone, vice chair of the city school board, said poor performance on state tests by special-education students this year shows that stability in their classrooms is important.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | June 6, 2014
A former long-term substitute at an Ellicott City middle school already facing child porn and sex abuse charges was indicted on an additional 50 counts of child pornography by a Howard County grand jury this week.  Jeremy Sykes, 43, of Hesperus Drive in Columbia, was indicted on the additional 50 counts on June 3. The additional charges were filed by police in May after investigators said they discovered 50 images of child pornography on Sykes'...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
Elizabeth P. "Betsy" Johnson, a homemaker and former educator who had lived in Stoneleigh for many years, died Feb. 5 of influenza at the William Breman Jewish Home in Atlanta. She was 92. Mrs. Johnson, who had a home in Devon Hill in North Roland Park, had lived in Atlanta for the past three years after breaking a leg, family members said. The daughter of an attorney and a homemaker, Elizabeth Pruitt was born and raised in Hickory, N.C., where she graduated in 1938 from Hickory High School.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
While it sounds encouraging on paper, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to open youth curfew centers in Baltimore represents a misplaced priority ( "Mayor proposes year-round curfew centers," Feb. 10). Once again, the onus is on Big Brother, not parents, to dictate how and if children in Baltimore live more enriched lives. Schools provide early morning activities as well as a breakfast and lunch. Then there are after-school programs and activities, some school-based. Do we see the enabling trend here?
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
When Delinda Fogel, publisher of the Saint Augustine Record , invited members of the public to proofread the paper in a campaign to eliminate typos and grammatical errors, she got for her pains some attention from Jim Romenesko's site  and a horselaugh from Saturday Night Live .  I think that consulting readers about their preferences, concerns, and issues is generally a good thing, but I suspect that Ms. Fogel's effort is...
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
Bonnie Battersby will have to forgive Harford County Schools Superintendent Jeffrey N. Grotsky for not following her second-grade lesson plan."I left a note for her explaining that I didn't get to some things -- like the science lesson," said Grotsky, a former special education teacher, who filled in for Battersby at Edgewood Elementary School one day last week. "Substitutes have to be flexible."Grotsky's classroom duty was part of the county's first-in-the-state program that will require 57 Harford school administrators and supervisors -- all certified teachers -- to spend one day each month in the classroom.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A limit should be set on the time it takes to clear or dismiss a teacher accused of misconduct so that employees do not remain out of their schools for months and even years, legislators and education advocates said this week. While two legislators suggested action by the General Assembly, an education advocate said some agreement could be reached between unions and school systems on how to expedite a process that is expensive to taxpayers and detrimental to children whose classrooms are staffed by substitutes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Gwendolyn H. "Winkie" Davis, a retired substitute and kindergarten teacher, died Nov. 12 of complications from diabetes at Woodbridge Valley Manor Care Center in Catonsville. She was 92. Gwendolyn Hughes was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. After graduating in 1938 from Dunbar High School, she earned her teaching certificate in 1940 from what was then Coppin Normal School. The longtime Waverly resident was a Baltimore public schools substitute teacher for more than 25 years, including many years at Clifton Park Junior High School.
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