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NEWS
August 27, 2010
Despite the Monumental City's monumental fiscal and other problems, the Gucci liberals who purportedly govern it and their state and federal counterparts have decided to provide $1.25 million in loans, grants and tax credits to well-connected insiders to renovate an old movie theater, which no doubt will screen only films favored by the high-brow set ("City panel approves deal for Cusacks to run the Senator," Aug. 26). As a resident of the northern suburbs, I suppose that I should be grateful for the availability of this facility, which is much closer to my home than the downtown theme park where I might otherwise go for entertainment.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
The project seemed simple enough - build a waste-to-energy plant on the Eastern Shore fueled by poultry manure, keeping it from flushing into and polluting the bay, while creating green jobs and boosting Maryland's fledgling renewable energy industry But 18 months after it was heralded by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the $75 million project has been stymied after prospective sites and a potential partnership fell through. Now state officials are weighing giving Green Planet Power Solutions, the California-based company chosen to build the 13.4-megawatt plant, a nearly $35 million subsidy on top of what the state previously agreed to pay for its power.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
The University of Maryland's deal to join the Big Ten includes not only the lucrative annual payouts that all members receive, but also a significant concession obtained by the school - a subsidy worth tens of millions of dollars from the conference to offset athletic teams' anticipated higher travel costs, according to multiple sources. The subsidy, which Maryland was promised in negotiations with the conference late last year, made an already appealing offer of Big Ten membership even more attractive to the school.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration is set to give $200,000 to help H&S Bakery move its Harbor East distribution center to an industrial area of East Baltimore - sparking discussion of whether subsidies should be needed to help a successful business expand. City officials are praising the deal, which goes before the Board of Estimates Wednesday, as an inexpensive way to keep a large employer in Baltimore. But others are questioning why H&S needs any help from a cash-strapped city that has cut back on fire companies and recreation centers in recent years.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
I wrote a story for Saturday's paper on how the Big Ten privately agreed to subsidize Maryland's anticipated team travel costs to the tune of $20 million to $30 million. Here is the link . Maryland is scheduled to join the conference in July 2014. It anticipates its travel budget will approximately double from what it is today. There is another issue related to travel. It's how you make sure athletes on more extended road trips can avoid missing too many classes and keep up with their studies.
NEWS
December 3, 2002
THE ANNUAL subsidy that the U.S. government will pay out to American grain and soybean farms over the next decade will be greater than the entire gross domestic product of all but three nations in sub-Saharan Africa. How can any African farmer compete with that? The United States has high-cost agriculture, because of the high price of land, labor, equipment and fertilizers, and the only way to make it pay is to produce in volume -- and rake in a concomitant government subsidy, to the tune of $150 billion to $200 billion over the next 10 years.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
A bill authorizing a tax subsidy for developers of a west side revitalization project is expected to be introduced during Monday's Baltimore City Council meeting. The subsidy, in the form of a Payment in Lieu of Taxes, or PILOT, would go to Lexington Square Partners LLC, developers of the proposed $150 million Lexington Square apartment and retail project in an area known as the Superblock, which has long been targeted for renewal. The tax break is being proposed to help offset the cost of building a 296-unit apartment tower and a 650-space garage.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | April 2, 1998
Legislation pending before the Maryland General Assembly would order a study of the viability of the state's major racetracks and racing industry, to determine whether they require continued taxpayer subsidy.Del. John R. Leopold, an Anne Arundel County Republican, sought unsuccessfully to delay any further subsidies to the industry until the report could be completed."I happen to think we have higher priorities than to bail out millionaires," Leopold said.Pub Date: 4/02/98
NEWS
December 6, 1993
Before the cheering starts, backers of hefty new subsidies to United States shipping lines had better read the fine print of a bill passed recently by the House. There's no money to pay for the $1.2 billion, 10-year handout.Yes, the maritime subsidy bill surmounted a big hurdle. Yes, the program would keep a portion of this country's small ocean-going fleet in business. Yes, the bill contains a few provisions to prod the industry to cut overhead costs and improve efficiency. But the bill is flat-out stalled in the Senate until someone comes up with a funding source.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and some lawmakers say they have devised a plan that would help provide affordable medications to thousands of seniors when a popular state program ends next year. Ehrlich, Del. Peter A. Hammen, a Baltimore Democrat, and Del. Donald B. Elliott, a Frederick Republican, crafted a change to a bill that will allow the state to complement the federal Medicare Part D medication payment program when it kicks in next year. The bill would take $14 million annually from Blue Cross and Blue Shield to fill in coverage gaps in Part D, subsidizing 75 percent of deductibles for beneficiaries and paying $25 of their monthly $35 premiums - for a total of $487.
NEWS
By Jonathan Lesser | March 25, 2014
The Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) currently has an opportunity to ensure that Maryland consumers are not on the hook to pay for hundreds of millions of dollars in subsidized electricity that will be generated at Competitive Power Ventures' (CPV) St. Charles facility. The PSC should act in the best interest of Maryland consumers and repeal the subsidies. In 2011, power plant developers convinced the Maryland PSC, as well as their counterparts in New Jersey, to require the two states' respective electric utilities to enter into long-term contracts that would provide billions of dollars in subsidies to build new power plants.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | March 19, 2014
It's often assumed that people are paid what they're worth. According to this logic, minimum wage workers aren't worth more than the $7.25 an hour they now receive. If they were worth more, they'd earn more. Any attempt to force employers to pay them more will only kill jobs. By this same logic, CEOs of big companies are worth their giant compensation packages, now averaging about 300 times the pay of the typical American worker. They must be worth it or they wouldn't be paid this much.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The developer of the Harbor Point project will pay the city $400,000 in fees stemming from increased traffic under an agreement approved Wednesday by Baltimore's spending board. Under a second agreement, the city will accept responsibility for maintaining several small parks in the development, though Harbor Point will continue to own the land. City officials, who said the development will create thousands of jobs, described the agreements approved by the Board of Estimates as the latest steps necessary to make the $1.8 billion waterfront project a reality.
NEWS
December 28, 2013
During the last recession, more than 90 million people - a third of the nation's population - saw their incomes fall below 200 percent of the federal poverty line, or about $46,000 a year for a family of four. Many of those individuals and families have never recovered, and as a result states across the country are now facing what U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan calls "the worst rental affordability crisis that this country has known" as rising rents threaten millions of Americans with homelessness.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to use $10,000 in private foundation grants to fund a program designed to help low-income families stretch their food stamp benefits undoubtedly will help many of those struggling to make ends meet in the wake of this month's cuts to the federal Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, also known as food stamps. Under the mayor's proposal, food stamp recipients will be able to get up to $10 extra a week if they use their EBT (electronic benefits transfer)
NEWS
By Scott Klinger | October 21, 2013
Congress seems to be focusing its austerity efforts on America's most vulnerable citizens, including those who need help feeding their families. Meanwhile, large food subsidies that benefit the most affluent Americans aren't even on the table. The House of Representatives recently voted to cut $4 billion a year from food stamps, known more formally as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). A cut of that level would mean 3.8 million Americans would lose the help they receive to put food on their families' tables, according to the Congressional Budget Office.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 12, 1996
The Maryland Higher Education Commission turned down a bid yesterday by Columbia Union College to receive a state subsidy given to other private Maryland campuses under a 25-year-old program.The administrative appeal was filed at the behest of a federal judge who is hearing the college's lawsuit, which claims religious discrimination. The college sued the state in June. The commission ruled in a special meeting at St. Michaels.The commission ruled the school, affiliated with the Seventh-Day Adventist Church, was not eligible to receive the roughly $1,070 given for each Maryland student at private campuses because of the pervasively religious nature of its instruction.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 16, 1998
A federal lawsuit that challenged Howard County's requirement that landlords accept tenants with rent subsidies has been quietly dismissed.The suit was filed in May by Clary's Crossing Apartments in Columbia, after a woman with a federal Section 8 voucher complained to the county that she was denied a chance to rent an apartment there. County law barring discrimination against people with subsidized incomes essentially requires landlords to participate in the Section 8 housing program.But in October, the apartment complex dropped its challenge to that law after its owner, Merry Land & Investment Co. of Augusta, Ga., was acquired in a merger with Chicago-based Equity Residential Properties.
NEWS
By Bernard C. “Jack” Young | August 13, 2013
The debate surrounding the proposed Harbor Point project has generated some of the most spirited discussions that the Baltimore City Council has engaged in recently. I am very proud that scores of citizens were given the opportunity to participate in three public hearings held by the City Council's Taxation Finance and Economic Development Committee since early June. I am, however, disappointed that inaccurate information continues to cloud a project that could provide an enormous boost to Baltimore's economy during a time of high unemployment.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
City Councilman Carl Stokes, chairman of the taxation committee, says he is refusing to physically sign legislation needed to approve public subsidies for the $1.8 billion Harbor Point development. The city's taxation committee voted 3-0 Wednesday night to approve $107 million in public financing for infrastructure and parks at the waterfront project, over the objections of Stokes, who left the room in disgust as the vote was being taken. As committee chairman, Stokes has some administrative duties for bills approved by his committee.
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