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NEWS
November 7, 2013
Why are long-time Columbia residents outraged by the county's plan to buy the Verona Apartments and increase the amount of low-income housing surrounding the Oakland Mills Village Center? I can explain it: 60 percent. That's how many children at Stevens Forest Elementary School currently receive free or reduced-price lunches. The average for the entire county is only 20 percent. Next door in Talbot Springs, 47 percent of the children receive free or reduced-price lunches and 22 percent have limited English proficiency.
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The city expects a flood of applications when it opens the wait list for Section 8 housing vouchers this month for the first time in more than a decade. Housing advocates say 50,000 families or more might sign up for a lottery to fill 25,000 places on the Housing Authority's wait list for the tenant-based housing choice vouchers. The coveted federal subsidies help families pay the portion of their rent that exceeds 30 percent of their income. The vouchers can be used to rent any residence, subject to a cap. In Baltimore, that is roughly $900 for a one-bedroom apartment.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | May 19, 1991
More than 100 families could be evicted from Pioneer City if the owners succeed in buying out of their federal contracts to provide subsidized housing.Under the nation's new Affordable Housing Act, owners of buildings financed with low-interest government loans can seek early release from their 20-year agreements to rent to poor and moderate-income families.Some of the 45 owners of Pioneer City, a 500-unit town house complex in Severn, have applied to buy out of their agreements with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
City officials aren't quite sure what to call the new development in Southeast Baltimore, but they turned out in force Tuesday to celebrate the first apartments completed on land that once held the sprawling O'Donnell Heights public housing complex. Eventually, the 62-acre parcel is supposed to contain 925 homes - a mix of subsidized housing, market-rate apartments and owner-occupied units. The 76 "Key's Pointe" homes that officials celebrated Tuesday, half of which are to be rented at market rates, are to be followed by another 75, on which construction could begin as early as next year.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
Despite an outcry from neighboring communities and objections from the Harford County executive, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development has approved converting 209 rental townhouses in Edgewood from light subsidies to heavily subsidized Section 8 housing.The conversion at the Meadowood Townhouses off Hanson Road near Route 24 will bring the number of Section 8 homes in Edgewood to more than 700, according to the Harford County Housing Agency.It will mean a reduction in rent for more than 80 current residents at the complex and will make about 125 vacant townhouses available at reduced rates, said Larry Hatcher, deputy manager of the Baltimore HUD office.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
Once considered for demolition, a nine-story building that is one of Columbia's oldest and largest for subsidized housing could undergo an $8.5 million renovation and expansion if the County Council approves. Two resolutions due for introduction Tuesday night before the County Council would allow financing through the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. Harper House, a 100-unit building for low-income residents in the village of Harper's Choice, could get more two-bedroom units, larger one-bedroom apartments, a new activity room and energy-saving features.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The city expects a flood of applications when it opens the wait list for Section 8 housing vouchers this month for the first time in more than a decade. Housing advocates say 50,000 families or more might sign up for a lottery to fill 25,000 places on the Housing Authority's wait list for the tenant-based housing choice vouchers. The coveted federal subsidies help families pay the portion of their rent that exceeds 30 percent of their income. The vouchers can be used to rent any residence, subject to a cap. In Baltimore, that is roughly $900 for a one-bedroom apartment.
NEWS
November 21, 2013
Regarding Kay Wisniewski's letter Nov. 7, "More subsidized housing will put 'unfair burden on schools,' " what Ms. Wisniewski fails to understand is that the people whom the county is targeting already live in the Verona. They are the working people in Columbia, people with jobs, with dreams, with aspirations, to live in a great community with good schools, and the county's purchase of the complex will not increase their population, but prevent them from being displaced. The Washington Post had an interesting article recently about certain ZIP codes, like Clarksville, which were exclusively affluent and very homogenous.
NEWS
May 6, 1991
In some corners of Howard County, it seems, affordable housing is pushing up against a wall of elitism. Consider Democratic county council member Shane Pendergrass' opposition to new subsidized housing in Elkridge."
NEWS
June 5, 1991
From: Les SticklesBoard of directorsElkridge Community Assoc.Your April 10 edition of The Howard County Sun had a front-page article titled "Low cost housing: Where?"After reading the article there were several points that were inaccurate and need to be corrected.First, it states that Councilperson(D-1st) Shane Pendergrass' comments were triggered by an upcoming Board of Appeals hearing on the 196-unit Orchard Club apartment development. The 196 units referred to are phase 1 of this development and need no additional hearings before the Board of Appeals.
NEWS
November 21, 2013
Regarding Kay Wisniewski's letter Nov. 7, "More subsidized housing will put 'unfair burden on schools,' " what Ms. Wisniewski fails to understand is that the people whom the county is targeting already live in the Verona. They are the working people in Columbia, people with jobs, with dreams, with aspirations, to live in a great community with good schools, and the county's purchase of the complex will not increase their population, but prevent them from being displaced. The Washington Post had an interesting article recently about certain ZIP codes, like Clarksville, which were exclusively affluent and very homogenous.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
Why are long-time Columbia residents outraged by the county's plan to buy the Verona Apartments and increase the amount of low-income housing surrounding the Oakland Mills Village Center? I can explain it: 60 percent. That's how many children at Stevens Forest Elementary School currently receive free or reduced-price lunches. The average for the entire county is only 20 percent. Next door in Talbot Springs, 47 percent of the children receive free or reduced-price lunches and 22 percent have limited English proficiency.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Though I understand your logic in calling for illegal immigrants to get in-state tuition at Maryland colleges and universities ( "College bound, but undocumented," Jan. 24), I absolutely disagree with you. If we, as Maryland citizens, keep welcoming illegal immigrants to come to this sanctuary state for things like reduced tuition, subsidized housing, food stamps, drivers licenses and free medical care, we will become the California of the East Coast, a bankrupt state wondering why we let it happen.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
Once considered for demolition, a nine-story building that is one of Columbia's oldest and largest for subsidized housing could undergo an $8.5 million renovation and expansion if the County Council approves. Two resolutions due for introduction Tuesday night before the County Council would allow financing through the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. Harper House, a 100-unit building for low-income residents in the village of Harper's Choice, could get more two-bedroom units, larger one-bedroom apartments, a new activity room and energy-saving features.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
It ended not with a bang or even a whimper, but something more like a sigh of resignation. There was the rumble of the dusty yellow Caterpillar machine, clawing down the vacant apartment complex, and cheers from the gathered city officials and nearby residents. But mostly, when the Pall Mall Apartments bit the dust Thursday, what it sounded like was simple failure. Not that anyone was mourning the demolition of the complex on Pimlico Road just south of Cold Spring Lane, which had 31 units and received federal Section 8 vouchers to house the poor.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
Howard County housing officials had 17 subsidized houses to sell but only nine qualified buyers this week in the first attempt this year to match working families with housing they can afford. The county plans to award up to 60 new townhouses and condominium apartments to buyers this year as long-planned developments along the U.S. 1 corridor come to fruition. But despite interest from hundreds of families, there were not enough qualified purchasers.
NEWS
By Staff report | April 10, 1991
County Council member Shane Pendergrass, D-1st, says she will opposenew subsidized housing in Elkridge until other areas of the county have been explored.Pendergrass' district ranks fourth of five council districts in the number of subsidized housing units, said Housingand Community Development Board Chairman James C. Landerkin."I am of the firm opinion that while the need for affordable housing in the county is critical, before Elkridge is asked to accommodate more subsidized housing, other areas of the county need to make room for their fair share," Pendergrass wrote Elkridge civic leaders in a March 14 letter.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Though I understand your logic in calling for illegal immigrants to get in-state tuition at Maryland colleges and universities ( "College bound, but undocumented," Jan. 24), I absolutely disagree with you. If we, as Maryland citizens, keep welcoming illegal immigrants to come to this sanctuary state for things like reduced tuition, subsidized housing, food stamps, drivers licenses and free medical care, we will become the California of the East Coast, a bankrupt state wondering why we let it happen.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | October 14, 2007
Howard County Council Chairman Calvin Ball ran into a verbal buzz saw from about three dozen Oakland Mills residents who attended a Village Board meeting last week to hear him explain three seemingly innocuous housing bills he sponsored this month. The resentment surfaced despite positive news in Oakland Mills in recent years. Construction is about to begin on a new office-retail building next to the village center, filling a vacant lot where a gas station once stood, and four large, upscale, detached homes are being built a block away- the kind of high-priced development the village residents say they want.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
To help lower-income working families, construction is starting on an $11 million, 84-unit apartment complex off U.S. 1 in Elkridge - the first new, subsidized units in the county in years. Called Port Capital Village, the eight-building complex will offer two- and three-bedroom units for rents ranging from $528 to $975 a month, based on income. The units are intended for families earning between $20,000 and $45,000 a year. The first units should be complete within a year. The complex is next to the 243-lot Aladdin Village mobile home park, north of Route 175, where residents are awaiting word on when their park will close for redevelopment.
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