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By David Zurawik | August 14, 2012
DISH subscribers could lose access to WBFF and WNUV (Channels 45 and 54) at midnight Wednesday in a disagreement over retransmission fees. "Based on current state of negotiations, there's a risk DISH won't be carrying us after midnight Wednesday," Barry Faber, executive vice president for Sinclair Broadcast Group,  said this morning. WBFF is owned and WNUV is managed by Sinclair, which is based in Hunt Valley. "We're hopeful, we'll get a deal, but we're also realistic," he added, saying that Sinclair wants to keep viewers informed.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday. Under the deal -- finalized before Maryland enters the Big Ten conference next Tuesday -- Comcast cable subscribers in the principal markets for Maryland and Rutgers will be able to access the network without subscribing to a separate sports tier.   The network is already available to most local Maryland fans, who often pay a fee added to their cable operators' bills for extra sports programming.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | August 1, 2012
In a move that most saw coming, BioWare will open up its “Star Wars” MMO, “The Old Republic” for free play this fall. Reports over the last six months of the game losing subscribers have been steady, with the company confirming Tuesday that the amount of paying customers has “dipped below one million.” BioWare has tried to bolster interest in the midst of the falling subscription numbers by offering free trial weekends to new players...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Nearly 17,000 Broadstripe cable TV subscribers could lose channels such as MTV, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central, VH1 and BET if the Anne Arundel County cable provider and Viacom fail to reach an agreement by Tuesday. The dispute centers on monthly per-subscriber fees the cable company pays to carry Viacom's 23 networks. Such cutoffs typically are short-lived, lasting until the companies reach agreement. Millersville-based Broadstripe, which serves 16,684 customers in northern Anne Arundel County and part of Baltimore, said Viacom wants to substantially boost fees to renew its contract.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Nearly 17,000 Broadstripe cable TV subscribers could lose channels such as MTV, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central, VH1 and BET if the Anne Arundel County cable provider and Viacom fail to reach an agreement by Tuesday. The dispute centers on monthly per-subscriber fees the cable company pays to carry Viacom's 23 networks. Such cutoffs typically are short-lived, lasting until the companies reach agreement. Millersville-based Broadstripe, which serves 16,684 customers in northern Anne Arundel County and part of Baltimore, said Viacom wants to substantially boost fees to renew its contract.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
A 17-month-old class action lawsuit filed by subscribers of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland came to an end yesterday when the state's highest court ruled they have no standing to sue the insurer for mismanagement.In a 35-page ruling, the Maryland Court of Appeals dismissed the subscribers' argument that they should have the same right to sue as do stockholders in a corporation or members of a co-operative. The subscribers had argued that because the not-for-profit Blue Cross has no shareholders and that its board had presided while former executives mismanaged the company, they were the only independent parties who could sue to recover the losses that resulted.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
Five subscribers of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland sued 18 of the insurance company's present and former executives and directors yesterday, saying they "recklessly wasted" millions of dollars and seeking $145 million in damages to restore the company's financial health.The lawsuit, filed in Circuit Court for Baltimore County, names several prominent Baltimore business leaders, as well as ousted president Carl J. Sardegna and his former top managers. It charges them with gross negligence and mismanagement, misuse of corporate assets for personal benefit and breach of fiduciary duty, actions which cost "massive losses of subscriber money."
NEWS
October 3, 2011
I understand the decision you have taken to charge for access to the digital content at The Sun, and frankly I'm glad you've done it. We face a very simple problem: News is expensive to produce. If readers don't pay for the news, it cannot be produced. And of course, without an active, critical, independent press, democracy cannot succeed. I therefore value the service you provide highly, and I'm willing to pay for it. In fact, I already do pay for it: I have subscribed to home delivery service of The Sun for years.
NEWS
July 1, 1994
BALTIMORE -- Amid sharp criticism of cable service in Baltimore, the city's Board of Estimates approved a proposal Wednesday that would compensate subscribers by at least $13 each for overcharges from Sept. 1, 1993 through July 14.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Council President Mary Pat Clarke raised concerns about service provided by United Artists Cable, including the company's failure to connect 48 schools and the fact that subscribers must go to the headquarters to have their service turned back on."
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | May 6, 1994
Subscribers of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland sought to convince the state's highest court yesterday that they are not ordinary customers and should be allowed to sue the directors and executives they claim nearly ran the insurer into the ground.In a bid to reactivate a March 1993 class-action suit, attorney Abraham Dash likened the subscribers to shareholders in a co-operative rather than customers of a corporation. Under state corporate law, customers don't have the right to sue directors -- but shareholders do."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
On Jan. 14, 2013, a crowd gathered for a ribbon-cutting ceremony on West Fayette Street at the site of what had been the Empire Theatre a century earlier. With a restored, glistening facade and entirely new interior, the venue officially opened as the Everyman Theatre , new home to one of Baltimore's finest cultural assets. One year later, the company is flourishing there. "This was a risky move," says Vincent Lancisi, Everyman's artistic director. "It's nice to walk in the building and go 'Whew, we made it.' We made the transition from [a rented location on North Charles Street]
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield said Wednesday that it would offer more than 55,500 customers the chance to extend their healthcare plans for another year, even though the policies don't comply with the federal Affordable Care Act. Maryland's insurance commissioner had told insurers a day earlier that such a move would be legal, and last week a beleaguered President Barack Obama asked states and insurers to consider the extensions. The president had promised Americans that if they liked their plans, they could keep them.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Comcast Corp. cable TV subscribers might have noticed a small new charge in their bills recently. After years of giving customers with "standard/expanded" basic cable service up to two digital TV adapters for free as part of the upgrade to all-digital broadcasting, the cable provider now is charging $1.99 a month per digital adapter. The new fees, being rolled out in each of Comcast's markets, took effect in March in the Baltimore area. The company, which declined to provide the number of subscribers affected, said it notified customers ahead of time of the decision and that pricing always has been subject to change.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
The Broadway phenomenon known as “The Book of Mormon,” a musical from the creators of “South Park” that became a runaway hit two years ago and shows no signs of flagging, will reach Baltimore next season as part of the Hippodrome's 10th anniversary. Joining “Mormon,” which took the Tony Award for best musical in 2011, will be the Tony winner for best play that year, “War Horse,” a show celebrated for its inventive use of life-sized puppetry. One of last year's big Tony accumulators, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” a play with music based on the novel by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson, is also on the Hippodrome lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
On Thursday, Netflix announced a Feb. 1 release date for "House of Cards," the Baltimore-made political drama starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright. All 13 episodes of the first season will be available to subscribers on that date. The whole project is a huge risk with a new business model, and it will be fascinating to see how it works out for Netflix with this distribution formula. Here's the release: The Netflix original series, from Media Rights Capital, “House of Cards,” starring Academy Award ® winner Kevin Spacey (“Horrible Bosses,” “American Beauty”)
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | September 7, 2012
Saturday night's football game between No. 1 Gilman and New Jersey power Don Bosco Prep, last year's No. 1 team in USA Today's Super 25 national rankings, will be streamed live on www.msgvarsity.com/livecast . The game will be available to subscribers and non-subscribers when it kicks off at 7:45 p.m. You can also see the earlier game between Good Counsel and another New Jersey team, St. Joseph's Regional, at 4:30 p.m.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | October 4, 2007
Verizon Communications Inc., the second-largest U.S. phone company, was accused in a lawsuit filed yesterday of setting inflated prices for advertising by exaggerating the number of subscribers to its FiOS fiber-optic cable service. Verizon overstates subscribers by including prospective customers, not just actual ones, advertiser Digital Art Services said in a complaint in U.S. District Court in Manhattan. "Verizon's internal documents show, and Verizon has now admitted, that Verizon has a policy of inflating the number of its reported FiOS subscribers," Digital Art said in the complaint.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2002
Adelphia Communications overstated both the number of its cable subscribers and its cash flow for 2001, people close to the company said yesterday. The number of cable subscribers has been overstated by at least 4.3 percent and perhaps as much as 10 percent, these people said, although the exact figure is still being determined. The company inflated its estimated $1.55 billion in 2001 cash flow by tens of millions of dollars and possibly by more, they said. The company also overstated its estimated 2001 cash flow - or earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization - by tens of millions through a complex swap transaction on the purchase of digital set-top boxes from Motorola Inc. and Scientific Atlanta Inc., these people said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | August 14, 2012
DISH subscribers could lose access to WBFF and WNUV (Channels 45 and 54) at midnight Wednesday in a disagreement over retransmission fees. "Based on current state of negotiations, there's a risk DISH won't be carrying us after midnight Wednesday," Barry Faber, executive vice president for Sinclair Broadcast Group,  said this morning. WBFF is owned and WNUV is managed by Sinclair, which is based in Hunt Valley. "We're hopeful, we'll get a deal, but we're also realistic," he added, saying that Sinclair wants to keep viewers informed.
NEWS
August 1, 2012
Here we go again: BGE, which has a miserable reputation for maintaining its distribution grid, is seeking yet another rate increase ("BGE requests rate increase for electric, gas distribution," July 27). Subscribers are ever more susceptible to power outages because BGE has cut its operating costs at consumers' expense. BGE reduced its operating costs (and its ability to provide consistently available power) by reducing its maintenance and service capabilities. Now it wants the under-serviced subscribers to once again underwrite its managerial failures.
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