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NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A federal grand jury has subpoenaed congressional records from Rep. Curt Weldon, a Pennsylvania Republican, as part of an escalating Justice Department corruption probe aimed at determining whether Weldon used his influence to win favors for family members, people familiar with the investigation said. The previously unreported subpoena was issued by a grand jury in Washington before the November election, although it is not clear when Weldon received it. The 10-term lawmaker was at the time in a tight race to retain his seat representing the Philadelphia suburbs, which he subsequently lost to Democrat Joe Sestak, a retired Navy vice admiral.
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HEALTH
By John Fritze and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Federal auditors looking into Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange are subpoenaing documents as part of their probe and have sought information from the lead contractor hired by the state to build the site. North Dakota-based Noridian Healthcare Solutions, the former prime contractor with a multimillion-dollar deal to design Maryland's online insurance marketplace, received a request for documents related to the project from the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on July 30, the company's president said Tuesday.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau Staff writers Lyle Denniston and Carl M. Cannon contributed to this article | January 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to ensure that their personal files on a controversial Arkansas land deal do not become public, Bill and Hillary Clinton have sought and received legal protection for documents the president volunteered to turn over to the Justice Department.A senior White House adviser, Bruce R. Lindsey, said in a statement last night that the Clintons' lawyer, David E. Kendall, requested a Justice Department subpoena last month, on the same day that President Clinton voluntarily agreed to turn over the files, to "assure the integrity of the documents and the privacy of the process."
NEWS
By Matt Bowman | June 23, 2014
What if any time a citizen spoke at a city council meeting to oppose a policy, the city could later order the citizen to go to court, produce all his private emails, and be interrogated by the city's lawyer? That would be a great policy … if your goal was to suppress citizen participation in the democratic process and let corrupt government officials do whatever they want because the people are too afraid to watch over Big Brother's shoulder. Yet that is what the city of Baltimore is trying to do right now to non-profit organizations that oppose abortion - and that are not even located in Baltimore or Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 13, 2011
I got a surprising update Friday on the state prosecutor's criminal probe into the Ehrlich campaign's deceptive election-night robocall. The update: They've just subpoenaed someone to testify before a grand jury on the matter later this month. The surprising part: The subpoena was served on that someone right in front of me. He and I were sitting in a cafe Friday morning, chatting about things political but in no way related to Bob Ehrlich, campaign operative Julius Henson or the robocall that falsely assured voters, before the polls closed that November night, that they should "relax," sit back and watch the election on TV because Gov. Martin O'Malley had already won. As we talked, my companion got a call on his cell phone.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
The Baltimore City Council voted yesterday to subpoena financial records of Educational Alternatives Inc., forcing the company to provide detailed information of its financial dealings with the city.By the end of the week, 2nd District Councilman Carl Stokes said, the city will issue the appropriate papers to EAI requiring officials to immediately make public company travel and maintenance expenses and attorney fees. Mr. Stokes also said the city will subpoena information on per-pupil costs, lobbying and an explanation of 1993 financial statements.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 16, 1994
ATLANTA -- A Memphis Criminal Court judge ruled yesterday that James Earl Ray, the confessed assassin of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., will be allowed to subpoena witnesses in support of his assertions of innocence and his request for a new trial.In what one prosecutor termed a "bizarre" situation, Judge Joseph Brown said he was constrained by Tennessee law to deny the new trial being sought by Ray because the time limit allowed for such appeals had long since expired.Judge Brown is hearing Ray's ninth appeal since he pleaded guilty in 1968.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1995
A Circuit Court judge ruled yesterday that a City Council committee may issue a subpoena compelling a Baltimore public housing commissioner to testify about the city's troubled $25.6 million no-bid program to repair rundown homes.Judge Thomas Ward granted a motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit filed by Martin O'Malley, a councilman representing the 3rd District and chairman of the council's Legislative Investigations Committee. The subpoena would force testimony from Reginald C. Thomas, chairman of the city housing authority's board of commissioners.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House Judiciary Committee issued a broad subpoena yesterday for additional documents concerning the abrupt firing of eight U.S. attorneys, and Chairman John Conyers Jr. warned Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales that time has run out for disagreements over how much material will be handed over. "We have been patient," said Conyers, a Michigan Democrat, but the Department of Justice has not shown "any meaningful willingness" to cooperate with the widening investigation by congressional Democrats.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Embattled Sen. Bob Packwood was on the verge of resigning from the Senate on Friday but changed his mind after he received a Justice Department subpoena for his personal diaries, the Senate's top two Republican leaders said yesterday.The Oregon Republican, accused of making unwanted sexual advances and already fighting a Senate subpoena for his private memoirs, decided to remain in the Senate to have a better forum to defend himself, according to Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas, and Minority Whip Alan K. Simpson of Wyoming.
SPORTS
March 28, 2014
Baltimore Sun producer-editor Jonas Shaffer and  reporters Jeff Barker and Don Markus weigh in on three topics from the past week in Maryland sports. Could the Terps have used former Temple forward and much-sought-after transfer target Anthony Lee, a Columbia native? Jonas Shaffer:   Yes, but so could just about every team in the nation . Not often do you find 6-foot-9 graduate transfers who average 13.6 points and 8.6 rebounds per game. Even less often do you encounter said transfers who hail from right up the road and, more than that, offer a conceivably perfect crutch for a wobbly frontcourt.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Documents filed Friday in the University of Maryland's legal battle with the Atlantic Coast Conference show that subpoenas have been issued to at least 10 ACC schools - plus various broadcast media partners - seeking information about the ACC's $52 million exit fee and a number of other topics. In accompanying court filings, Maryland, which is contesting the exit fee as it prepares to join the Big Ten Conference in July, accuses the ACC of seeking to withhold information, along with more than $20 million in shared conference revenue.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Baltimore County pain treatment center is resisting involvement in a probe into the deadly national fungal meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids last year. Baltimore Pain Management Center, which received some doses of the recalled medications, filed an objection Tuesday in federal court to a subpoena it received last month. Lawyers are seeking documents from 76 clinics across the country, including seven in Maryland, that received the drugs as they build a case against New England Compounding Pharmacy Inc., the Massachusetts facility that produced them.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Seven Maryland health care centers that received tainted steroids linked to a nationwide meningitis outbreak will be required to turn over documents and give testimony under subpoenas filed last week in a federal lawsuit. A steering committee of lawyers representing patients who were given doses of the medication filed 76 of the subpoenas across the country. Patients in 22 states received injections of the steroids last year before they were recalled; 745 of them developed fungal meningitis or other health issues as a result, and 58 died.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
The defense team for Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold is fighting prosecutors' move to block it from obtaining documents it claims would show the "same conduct" as that in criminal charges against Leopold has not been prosecuted before, showing inconsistencies in when charges are filed. The remarks come in a court filing this week in a dispute between the Office of the State Prosecutor and the defense. The defense wants material it argues goes to the heart of legal issues it is raising in the trial scheduled to begin Wednesday with jury selection.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Prosecutors in the coming criminal trial of Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold are asking that a judge throw out two defense subpoenas, saying one is for confidential information and the other for "inadmissible, irrelevant evidence. " The Office of the Maryland State Prosecutor contends that one defense subpoena would include reports the office made to the Attorney General's Office since 2008 that are confidential, according to the court filing. The other, according to the motion, is for emails between its office and Queen Anne's County prosecutors about decisions made in an investigation involving campaign signs in 2010.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | November 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- After two full days of debate, the Senate voted overwhelmingly last night to support a broad subpoena for thousands of pages of Bob Packwood's private diaries.The final tally was 94 to 6, with four Republicans and one Democrat joining Mr. Packwood in his bid to withhold from the Senate ethics committee material he fears may be used against him to prove unethical or illegal conduct.In the final hours of the often fractious deliberations, Mr. Packwood's colleagues indicated that they had lost their sympathy for him.Most outraged was Sen. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia, the Senate's senior Democrat, who suggested that Mr. Packwood's actions had been so offensive to the Senate that he should resign.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2003
Unlikely as it may sound, a subpoena to testify before a grand jury can be a badge of honor for a reporter - a sign that she's gotten the goods or angered the powers that be. Not in this case. Katie Leahan, a reporter and weekend anchor who often covers police and crime for WJZ-TV, is among those who have been subpoenaed to testify before a federal grand jury looking into the handling of a secret fund by Edward T. Norris when he was Baltimore's police commissioner. Questions have centered on Norris' use of the fund to pay for thousands of dollars in gifts, meals and trips for himself, friends and colleagues.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
State investigators have asked Baltimore County officials for a broad range of information in an inquiry related to a planned Catonsville medical building, including communications between county employees and a developer, zoning files and a councilman's correspondence, according to a subpoena obtained by The Baltimore Sun. Subpoenas sent to a number of county agencies as part of a grand jury investigation sought a variety of records related to...
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
A lawmaker who alleged possible "institutional dishonesty" at the Anne Arundel County Police Department said Monday that the police chief's response does not resolve whether officers caught up in a civil case against County Executive John R. Leopold may have lied. Councilman Jamie Benoit said he may subpoena Chief Larry W. Tolliver and police officers to testify before the County Council. He said he also may demand documents from a recently concluded internal affairs investigation into the affidavit one of the officers gave in the federal civil case.
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