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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | May 1, 1991
LOUISVILLE -- Long shot Subordinated Debt was withdrawn from the prospective Kentucky Derby lineup yesterday, reducing the likely field to 16 or 17 runners.Trainer David Monaci was unavailable for comment, and has not been at Churchill Downs, but the horse's groom Billy Foxx said the Halo colt is out of the race, a development that Churchill Downs officials later confirmed."From what I understand, he is not going to run," Foxx said. "He's as sound as a clock, they just elected not to run. I just found out for sure this [yesterday]
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert | May 4, 2012
It's a recurring source of tension between reporters and government officials: How quickly do agencies have to release public information? That issue arose recently in emails between city officials that were obtained by The Baltimore Sun through a public records request. The Sun was working on a story about tax credits and orally requested copies of letters sent to several homeowners. Dorothy Reed, a manager in the Bureau of Revenue Collections, asked for a written request, and one was emailed to her shortly before 5 p.m. on a Friday.
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SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | November 11, 1990
NEW YORK -- Scan, whose year has been marked by frustration, regained the lead in the final strides and beat Subordinated Debt by a nose in the $177,600 Remsen Stakes for 2-year-olds at Aqueduct Race Course yesterday.The son of Mr. Prospector out of the Nijinsky II mare Video paid $3.80 to win as the favorite in a field of eight.Entering the stretch of the 1 1/8 -mile race, Scan held a narrow lead before Subordinated Debt pushed his nose in front at the sixteenth pole.But under strong urging by jockey Jerry Bailey, Scan rallied to win and earn $106,560 for his owner, William Haggin Perry.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 11, 2008
Gov. Sarah Palin abused the powers of her office by pressuring subordinates to get her former brother-in-law, a state trooper, fired, an investigation by the Alaska Legislature has concluded. A report on the bipartisan inquiry that was released yesterday by lawmakers in Anchorage concluded, however, that Palin was within her right to dismiss her public safety commissioner, Walt Monegan, who was the trooper's boss. The public portion of the report on the inquiry concluded that Palin violated the Alaska Executive Branch Ethics Act by allowing pressure to be exerted to get Trooper Michael Wooten, her former brother-in-law, dismissed.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Standard & Poor's downgraded the subordinated debt of Woodward & Lothrop yesterday, reflecting continued deterioration in the department store chain's financial condition.The company operates 17 Woodward & Lothrop department stores in the Baltimore-Washington area and 15 Philadelphia-area John Wanamaker stores.Woodward & Lothrop, commonly known as Woodies, competes against Hecht's, a division of May Department Stores Co. The company has stores in Columbia, White Marsh and Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | March 18, 1992
Baltimore Bancorp suffered another blow yesterday as Standard & Poor's Corp. slashed its rating of the company's subordinated debt and uninsured certificates of deposit, but the company shrugged off the rating agency's criticism and said it might be profitable this quarter.Standard & Poor's cut the rating of the parent company's subordinated debt to Double-C from Triple-C-plus and cut the rating of the Bank of Baltimore's uninsured CDs to Triple-C/Single-C from Double-B-minus/Single-B.But S&P stressed that federally insured deposits -- the vast majority of the bank's deposit base -- are not affected.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | March 18, 1992
Baltimore Bancorp suffered another blow yesterday as Standard & Poor's Corp. slashed its rating of the company's subordinated debt and uninsured certificates of deposit, but the company shrugged off the rating agency's criticism and said it might be profitable this quarter.Standard & Poor's cut the rating of the parent company's subordinated debt to Double-C from Triple-C-plus and cut the rating of the Bank of Baltimore's uninsured CDs to Triple-C/Single-C from Double-B-minus/Single-B.But S&P stressed that federally insured deposits -- the vast majority of the bank's deposit base -- are not affected by the move.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | March 27, 1991
Financially troubled Second National Federal Savings Bank, following a newly approved regulatory plan to boost capital, announced a plan yesterday to stop making cash payments to its sole preferred stockholder.Second National, one of the state's largest thrifts with $1.75 billion in assets, said that the Public Service Resources Corp. of New Jersey, a utility, had agreed to accept additional preferred stock in lieu of cash dividends and subordinated debt payments. The suspension of the $450,000 in quarterly debt payments is contingent upon similar terms being reached with other subordinated debt holders, with whom Second National is negotiating.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee Z | May 10, 1991
Honor Grades was the only one of the seven Preakness hopefuls stabled at Pimlico Race Course to undertake any serious work yesterday morning.The Danzig colt, trained by Carroll County native Rodney Rash, went six furlongs in 1 minute, 13 2/5 seconds with Danny Sorenson up.Rash said Chris McCarron will ride the colt in the May 18 Preakness.Honor Grades, owned by the Summa Stable of Bruce McNall and partners, finished second in the Derby Trial in his most recent start.Rash, 31, resigned as a longtime assistant to Charlie Whittingham several weeks ago to begin training on his own. When he saddled Honor Grades for the Derby Trial, it was his first official starter.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | January 23, 1991
A headline in yesterday's Business section incorrectly characterized the move by Standard & Poor's Corp. on the debt rating of Crestar Financial Corp. S&P said Tuesday that it lowered only the outlook for the long-term debt of the Richmond-based banking company, not the debt itself.Pointing to continued problems in the flagging real estate market, Standard & Poor's Corp. lowered its rating of Signet Banking Corp.'s debt and dropped the outlook for the long-term debt ratings of Crestar Financial Corp.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
Baltimore-based Provident Bankshares Corp., facing multimillion-dollar losses in a souring credit environment, said yesterday that it is cutting by two-thirds its dividend to shareholders and raising $115 million from investors to strengthen its financial position. It is the latest in a long line of banks that nationwide have been stung by the rapid deterioration in the housing and financing markets. As home prices fall and foreclosures rise, more financial institutions have needed infusions of cash - and not all have been able to get them.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 2007
The American Red Cross dismissed its president and chief executive, Mark W. Everson, yesterday because of his "personal relationship with a subordinate employee." He had been in office for only six months. The news was another blow to an organization that has struggled to overcome criticism of its performance after Hurricane Katrina and other disasters, and it stunned the organization's employees, as well as the nonprofit world at large. "Although this is difficult and disappointing news for the Red Cross community, the organization remains strong and the life-saving mission of the American Red Cross will go forward," Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, chairman of the Red Cross board, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Gregory Romano and Gregory Romano,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Although the battle of Little Round Top is one of the most famous events at the battle of Gettysburg, it was in many ways an accident. The commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. Robert E. Lee, ordered Lt. Gen. James Longstreet, commander of the army's 1st Corps, to attack the exposed southern flank of the 3rd Corps of the Union Army, which had advanced beyond the Union line on Cemetery Ridge to a position in the Peach Orchard along the Emmitsburg...
NEWS
By Bridget Seamon and Bridget Seamon,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
On July 1, 1863, Union and Confederate troops clashed at the Battle of Gettysburg in what proved to be Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's his final effort to move decisively from Virginia into the Northern states. Today, the battleground is covered with monuments and markers in remembrance of the estimated 51,000 soldiers who were killed, wounded or captured there, according to the National Park Service at Gettysburg. The Union walked away bloodied but victorious, halting Lee's attack and ultimately, the Confederate war effort.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2003
Rear Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, NEWPORT, R.I. -- A few months after Rear Adm. Rodney P. Rempt became president of the Naval War College here, he decided that the traditional graduation ceremony was too impersonal. It had been held on a forbidding concrete plaza, with friends and relatives cordoned off to one side. Students did not collect their diplomas one by one, but got up from their seats in one big group to be collectively pronounced graduates. So a year ago, Rempt moved the ceremony under a big white tent on a grassy field framed by Narragansett Bay. He called each graduate to the stage for a diploma, giving each a moment in the limelight and a chance to mug for a family snapshot.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The Johns Hopkins University announced yesterday that it will pay the government $800,000 to settle charges that it submitted fraudulent bills to Medicare. The case stems from a series of federal audits conducted in 1997 and 1998 of hospitals affiliated with medical schools. The investigations, known as Physicians at Teaching Hospitals (PATH) audits, looked at whether Medicare was billed for the correct level of service and whether faculty doctors were billing for work done by interns or residents.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | April 30, 1991
LOUISVILLE -- It's just two days before entries are taken for the 117th Kentucky Derby, but it's still uncertain just how many horses will start.*Here is the early lineup, with probable odds and jockeys:Strike The Gold (C. Antley)----- 5-2Hansel (J. Bailey)----- 3-1Fly So Free (J. Santos)----- 7-2Best Pal (G. Stevens)----- 4-1Sea Cadet (C. McCarron)----- 6-1Olympio (E. Delahoussaye)----- 6-1Green Alligator (C. Nakatani)----- 12-1Corporate Report (P. Day)----- 12-1Happy Jazz Band (C. Asmussen)
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 6, 1991
ELMONT, N.Y. -- While a camera crew from "Good Morning America" has tailed Nick Zito in the morning, other media members have been quizzing Frank Brothers and D. Wayne Lukas about their horses' chances in Saturday's 123rd Belmont Stakes.This is not a trend. It is tradition for trainers of the favorites to draw the most attention in Triple Crown events. Logically, and perhaps rightfully, so.But here's a trend, for both the Belmont and the Triple Crown: losing favorites and obscure winners.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
Had his Naval Academy buddy won the presidency two years ago, retired Adm. Charles R. Larson would have been a regular in the White House these days, holding the title of national security adviser or perhaps secretary of defense. But Sen. John McCain lost that Republican primary battle, and Larson finds himself on a very different battlefield - seeking to be Maryland's next lieutenant governor as the running mate of Democrat Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. "I've had my day, I've had my time, I've been in command, and I've got my legacy that I'm very, very proud of," says the 65-year-old Larson.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 22, 2001
JERUSALEM - Yitzhak Mordechai, a decorated former general and Cabinet minister, was convicted yesterday of sexually assaulting two female subordinates in a case seen as marking the end of an era when bosses could freely exploit power and position to gain sexual favors. The verdict shattered the dynamic political prospects of a career military man once viewed as a pillar of integrity and recently considered as a potential prime minister. Women's rights activists said it will embolden women to file complaints about sexual offenses on the job without fear of punishment.
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