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By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | September 20, 1994
Rescue workers waited at the edge of Liberty Reservoir yesterday as divers searched to see if anyone was trapped in a van submerged about 60 feet offshore.The voice of diver Shawn Chenowith came over the radio, saying that no one was in the vehicle, and those standing on the boat ramp off Oakland Mills Road relaxed. The divers, Mr. Chenowith and Richard Green, swam back to shore after searching the waters around the van and finding nothing.Workers at the Emergency Operations Center in Westminster said they received a call about 9:20 a.m. saying a vehicle was in Liberty Reservoir and it wasn't known if anyone was inside.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
— Many farmers in this rural Kent County community were left shaken after a father and his two teenage sons were found dead early Thursday in a pond full of liquid manure on a local dairy farm. The deaths appear to be accidental, but investigators will wait for autopsy results before ruling out foul play, said Greg Shipley, Maryland State Police spokesman. The bodies, tentatively identified as those of Glen W. Nolt, 48, and his two sons, Kelvin R. Nolt, 18, and Cleason S. Nolt, 14, all of Peach Bottom, Pa., had taken hours to find, submerged in a 20-foot-deep, 2-million-gallon manure pit on Centerdel Farm, state police said.
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NEWS
July 8, 1999
UNDERWATER grasses make up the forest of the Chesapeake Bay. They nurture and shelter the estuary's creatures, hiding vulnerable young fish and crabs and feeding the geese and ducks. They are a powerful indicator of the health of the Chesapeake.After years of slow progress in restoring these submerged plants, the latest survey shows a slight setback. That's understandable given the uncontrolled vagaries of nature, such as weather, that don't stay neatly on a trend line.The worst news from the annual submerged grasses survey is that losses are occurring in places most important to blue crabs, notably Tangier Sound, the major nursery of juvenile crabs.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
A 72-year-old Rossville man who had been reported missing was found dead Tuesday in a car partially submerged in a Harford County creek, the Maryland State Police said. He was identified as Edward Jackson, 72, of the 5000 block of Brightleaf Court in eastern Baltimore County. The cause of his death will be determined by an autopsy. Jackson had last been seen leaving the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Baltimore at 5:30 a.m. Monday. Shortly before 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, the state police's Bel Air barrack received a call from a man walking northbound on Pylesville Road, just north of Wheeler School Road in Harford County.
NEWS
By Lisa W. Foderaro and Lisa W. Foderaro,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 2002
OLIVE, N.Y. -- It is the Catskills' own Atlantis: a dozen bucolic hamlets swallowed up almost a century ago in New York City's desperate desire for water. Hundreds of houses were dismantled or burned, 2,000 people were forced out and an even greater number of graves were moved so the land could be flooded. In their place lies the Ashokan Reservoir, a luminous basin surrounded by the deep green folds of the Catskill Mountains, a watery monument to the lost world of the Esopus Valley. While the drought this spring may be an annoyance to New York City and its suburbs, to the people in this quiet corner of Ulster County the drought has stirred something deeper.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Homicide detectives were mystified yesterday at how an automobile -- with the body of an unidentified man in the back seat -- ended up in a small reservoir in Northwest Baltimore's Ashburton neighborhood. The metallic-blue Chrysler LeBaron was spotted under water in Lake Ashburton by a police helicopter observer on routine patrol over the city yesterday. The car was perpendicular, with the driver's side wedged to the bottom of the reservoir, which is surrounded by a 6 1/2 -foot-high wrought-iron fence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2004
Last week's question How do you deal with hot weather? 40.7 percent Embrace it outside 33.3 percent Stay inside with the AC cranked 14.8 percent Leave town 3.7 Spend all my time in the pool 0 percent Hang out in the bath tub, submerged in ice 7.4 percent Other 27 votes Question of the week: What is the best thing about summer coming to an end? Better movies Clothing sales Cooler weather Kids back in school New TV shows Nothing!
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
The afternoon was warm at midweek, more like late March than the latter stages of February, warm enough to work up a sweat while refinishing the spars and struts of an old catamaran bought from a neighbor down the beach.And after the final coat of paint was sprayed, giving a new silver sheen to the aluminum extrusions that had been badly weathered through 20-some seasons, a light spinning rod and a box of spinners were pulled from a corner of the garage and we made our way down through the bramble and blow-downs of winter to the creek.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | September 20, 1994
Rescue workers waited at the edge of Liberty Reservoir yesterday as divers searched to see if anyone was trapped in a van submerged about 60 feet offshore.The voice of diver Shawn Chenowith came over the radio, saying that no one was in the vehicle, and those standing on the boat ramp off Oakland Mills Road relaxed. The divers, Mr. Chenowith and Richard Green, swam back to shore after searching the waters around the van and finding nothing.Workers at the Emergency Operations Center in Westminster said they received a call about 9:20 a.m. saying a vehicle was in Liberty Reservoir and it wasn't known if anyone was inside.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | June 8, 2003
I've heard about an unusual new fitness class called HydroRide. Is it a joke? Amazingly, no. As if chlorine hair or a numb derriere weren't bad enough alone, someone has taken spinning and moved it underwater. And there you have HydroRide, one of the newest trends in group fitness. OK, so you may not be entirely submerged -- just enough to increase the resistance on your legs by about 10 times. The pool is about 5 feet deep, and the bikes are specially designed for underwater use. The folks at Crunch Fitness, based in Los Angeles, concocted this concept.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
Police officers and fire personnel discovered a Chevrolet Astro Van submerged near the 3000 block of Hanover Street in Baltimore, near Harbor Hospital, around 7 a.m. Saturday, a police spokesman said. Further investigation revealed that the vehicle was unoccupied. Police spokesman Kevin Brown said he had no information on whether the vehicle was stolen. ed.gunts@baltsun.com
SPORTS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
Natural Resources Police patrol boats Monday found two more illegal fishing nets in the waters south of Kent Island and seized another half-ton of striped bass. The agency also announced that the reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the poachers who have netted more than 10 tons of fish has increased to $10,000. The first net was hauled out at 2 p.m. near Poplar Island. The 600-yard net, which officers estimated to be in the water since last year, contained "a couple of rockfish that were released alive and 200 to 300 horseshoe crabs," said Sgt. Art Windemuth, NRP spokesman.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | July 9, 2008
The shipwrecked houseboat of Fells Point sleeps with the fishes. The breached, 30-foot, nameless boat can no longer spoil the waterfront view at the east end of Thames Street at Patapsco's Northwest Harbor. The wheels of maritime justice ground slow, however. It took two years, but the city finally hauled the submerged beast away last month. "It's our summer season at the harbor, and we finally got tired of looking at it," says Tony Wallnofer, deputy operations director for Baltimore's Department of Transportation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | January 3, 2008
Giant jellyfish, a merman and lots of water ask audiences to question the origins of life. Two artists' distinctly different yet intimately linked bodies of work will be on display in the exhibit Sub-Merge at the Gallery Imperato tomorrow through Feb. 16. While the motivations of each artist differed, their works share the same overarching themes: water and the origins of life. "I hope the sense of visual beauty and embellishment will seduce the audience into thinking more deeply about biology, evolution and religion," said Gwyneth Scally, a Tucson, Ariz.
NEWS
By Maria Antonieta Uribe and Sam Enriquez and Maria Antonieta Uribe and Sam Enriquez,Los Angeles Times | November 3, 2007
VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico -- Flooding from a week of rain has forced hundreds of thousands of people to abandon their homes and seek shelter from muddy waters that covered an estimated 80 percent of Tabasco, a state on the Mexican Gulf Coast, including most of Villahermosa, the capital, officials said. Mexican military and government workers sent helicopters and rescue boats yesterday in an attempt to rescue tens of thousands of people trapped by floodwaters that reached the rooftops in low-lying neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | May 21, 2007
OFF TOLCHESTER BEACH -- The skies were a worrisome gray, and the wind was strong enough to knock over even the most seasoned seaman. Fishermen who had mulled a day on the water seemed to have quickly scrapped their plans - for miles, the Chesapeake Bay seemed almost deserted. But then the Patricia Campbell plowed through the whitecaps. The crew aboard the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's 60-foot research vessel hoisted a crane, loaded several concrete balls filled with holes and dropped them into the water.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | September 30, 1992
The alienation and anxiety of modern life constitute the theme of Steve Sherman's works currently at Towson State, and it is a theme we understand from looking at his paintings even if we aren't quite made to feel it.In a typical painting, Sherman places his figures (usually solitary but sometimes more than one) either in some relation to the sea -- floating, wading in, submerged -- or up in the sky in a self-propelled flying machine. In either case, the figure is in a somewhat alien milieu, or at any rate not on terra firma; the swimmers are quite literally "at sea," and their condition stands as a metaphor for the existentialism of the human condition in the 20th century.
NEWS
By Kevin Sack and Kevin Sack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2005
In 1718, French colonist Jean Baptiste LeMoyne de Bienville ignored his engineers' warnings about the hazards of flooding and mapped a settlement in a pinch of swampland between the mouth of the Mississippi River, the Gulf of Mexico and a massive lake to the north. Ever since, the water has both sustained New Orleans and perpetually threatened it. Somehow, until this week, the mystique of the water had always washed away the foreboding of disaster, as if carrying the city's worries downstream.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2005
Bay Theatre's intimate, 90-seat space in Annapolis provides an ideal home for playwright Harold Pinter, and the match only begins there. The strong, three-person cast of Betrayal conveys this human drama with all the painful, raw edges of this love triangle involving a long-term affair between a woman and her husband's best friend. Each actor is so skilled and their concentration so profound that audience members are drawn into their lives so completely that it seems like they are eavesdropping.
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