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By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun Reporter | August 29, 2007
The nicknames of Rear Adm. Eugene B. Fluckey -- "The Galloping Ghost of the China Coast" and "Lucky Fluckey" -- meant to bring a little levity to the exploits of one of the most decorated sailors in history. But as loved ones and shipmates approached an urn on display under the vast dome of the Naval Academy chapel yesterday to say a few words, many stopped in awe, bowing slightly as a last homage to the man who sank 29 Japanese ships as a submarine commander in the Pacific on his way to receiving the Medal of Honor and four Navy Crosses.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Peter John Vogelberger Jr., a retired nuclear engineer and past president of Teledyne Energy Systems who headed the development of devices used in 1970s space exploration, died of undetermined causes Sept. 7 at his Lutherville home. He was 82. Born and raised in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of Peter J. Vogelberger Sr. and the former Agnes Snyderwine. A standout high school athlete, he was recruited to the Naval Academy, where he was a member of the Class of 1954 and was an honors graduate.
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NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane and Michael E. Ruane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1995
"Silent Running: My Years on a World War II Attack Submarine," by James F. Calvert. John Wiley & Sons. Illustrated. 275 pages. $27.95 For better or worse, Retired Vice Admiral James F. Calvert's World War II submarine memoir reads like a decent, if schmaltzy, old-fashioned war movie."Silent Running" is the story of a straight-arrow Ohio college kid who wound up at the Naval Academy in 1939; who finagled his way into the submarine service; and who then helped command two U.S. submarines, from the far reaches of the Pacific to the sanctum of Toyko Bay.Along the way, Mr. Calvert, who went on to an illustrious career in nuclear subs and became the superintendent of the Naval Academy, tells of the evolution of American submarine warfare during World War II.He sketches vivid and terrifying scenes of being depth-charged by Japanese surface vessels - hours on end, with scores of explosions bashing leaks and pounding the stagnant air aboard the sub. He paints striking pictures of the boat plying exotic seas at night.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Greg Cantori has been stopped by police five times in recent months. The officers have all asked him the same question: What the heck are you riding? Each morning, Cantori steps into a vehicle resembling a yellow submarine and pedals the 24 miles from his Pasadena home to his Hampden office. Called a velomobile, it's one part tricycle, one part Wienermobile and entirely pedal-powered. It's also incredibly fast because of an aerodynamic shape - one officer who pulled over Cantori at the base of a hill clocked him at 50 miles per hour.
NEWS
By Albert J. Silverman | July 10, 1991
SEVENTY-FIVE years ago today, July 10, 1916, Baltimoreans were electrified to learn that the submarine Deutschland had arrived in the Patapsco and would dock near Fort McHenry. It was front-page news in The Sun, which hailed the event with these words:"Completing one of the most remarkable trips by a craft of its type ever attempted and making good a boast of the Germans that it could be done, the submarine Deutschland, carrying 1,000 tons of cargo, appeared in the Virginia Capes yesterday and will dock in Baltimore today.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2003
Capt. George Woodruff Forbes Jr., a retired career naval submarine officer and World War II veteran who later commanded the USS Torsk, died of kidney failure Monday at Lorien Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Bel Air. The Fallston resident was 85. Born and raised in Jackson, Miss., Captain Forbes was a 1939 graduate of the Naval Academy. After receiving his commission, he went to sea as an officer aboard the submarine S-23, which was assigned to the fleet at Pearl Harbor. He served aboard the S-38 and USS Raton in the early years of the war before being given command of the USS Bluefish in 1944.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
Capt. Slade Deville Cutter, a renowned Naval Academy football player and boxer who later as a World War II submariner was credited with sinking a record number of Japanese ships while earning four Navy Crosses, died of heart failure Thursday at the Ginger Cover retirement community in Annapolis. He was 93. "He was clearly one of World War II's great submarine heroes and compiled a magnificent record. He was a top-flight person and an outstanding athlete, and there is no question that he is a genuine hero," said retired Rear Adm. Charles Minter, a friend, and member of the Naval Academy Class of 1937.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson | April 12, 1992
The distance between the deck of the Navy's newest nuclear submarineand the streets of Maryland's capital is a lot shorter than you might think.Members of the ship's crew, who have spent more than a year preparing the USS Annapolis for sea duty, say it's more than just a name that ties them to the city.For close to two years, city leaders and members of a local groupcalled The USS Annapolis Commemorative Committee have been at work, raising money to pay for some "Welcome to our family" gifts for the crew.
NEWS
August 27, 2000
IN TIME, most Russians will forgive President Vladimir Putin's indecisiveness in handling the Arctic nuclear submarine disaster that killed 118. Didn't Stalin, after all, go into such a shock following Hitler's attack on the Soviet Union that nothing was heard from him for days? In the end, though, Mr. Putin can fully repair his reputation only if he realizes that in a democracy, people must be told the truth, however bitter it might be, and that official lies, tardiness and obfuscation cannot be tolerated.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 16, 2000
WASHINGTON - They probably want to smoke, to ease their nerves. But they cannot. They may want to scream. But they must not. They undoubtedly feel fear, but they must fight it. Anything to save air. For the crew of the sunken Russian submarine Kursk, saving oxygen became a paramount concern as soon as their air-pumping power plant shut down. And both air and hope appeared to be running out. Details remained sketchy on the condition of the Russian crew members and their prospects for survival, but U.S. and Russian submariners said life aboard the crippled sub is certainly grim and probably growing grimmer with every passing hour.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Nearly a month after Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 vanished, a team of Maryland engineers detected the pings from a flight data recorder that narrowed the search area to a more manageable yet still vast swath of the Indian Ocean. Working from an Australian warship involved in the search, a crew of nine from Phoenix International in Prince George's County deployed a U.S. Navy listening device to the depths of the ocean in the hunt for a signal from the doomed jetliner's black box. Tapped by the Navy to assist Malaysian, Chinese and Australian officials in the search, the team and their equipment had flown from an office and warehouse in Largo nearly two weeks earlier.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
John Guy Cesare Jr., a utility engineer who earned degrees in both the nuclear field and theology, served aboard Navy submarines in the Cold War and later volunteered for Baltimore's poor and homeless, died of cancer Jan. 8 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Roland Park resident was 64. Born and raised in Vicksburg, Miss., he was a 1967 graduate of St. Aloysius High School and earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering degree and a master's in nuclear engineering from Mississippi State University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
William N. Gill Sr., founder of the Village Sub Shop chain that had numerous sites in the city and Baltimore County and later included the Steak & Rib Restaurant, died Saturday of a heart attack at his Lutherville home. He was 82. William Norton Gill Sr., who was born and raised in the former 10th Ward in Baltimore, graduated in 1950 from Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington. He later worked for the old State Roads Commission and was a frozen food salesman. While sitting in a shopping center one day, Mr. Gill realized it would be the perfect location for a pizza shop.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Midshipmen at the Naval Academy could spend less time training at sea, some gates into Fort Meade could be shut down and routine maintenance at military installations across the state could be delayed under federal budget cuts set to begin Friday. Military bases in Maryland stand to lose $114 million in operational funding as part of the across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration. That is on top of the $359 million the Pentagon expects to save by furloughing 46,000 of its civilian workers in the state.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
Navy Lt. Jordon C. Sims, whose wife, Megan, is the daughter of Marylou Donhauser of Pylesville, and Michael Donhauser Jr. of Bel Air, and sailors from the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773), departed Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for a scheduled six-month deployment in the Western Pacific region. The crew had anxiously waited for the day to deploy after having spent months preparing and training for the missions they will soon undertake. From different weather patterns to deployed operational tasking, Cheyenne will face many challenges during deployment that are not normally encountered in the local operating area.
NEWS
By David W. Wise | July 13, 2011
A recent report by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments concluded, "Historically the U.S. military has often been slow to identify, adequately prioritize, and respond effectively to the emerging challenges likely to impose the greatest stresses on our forces in future contingencies…" The 30-year shipbuilding plan just submitted by the U.S. Navy unfortunately confirms this judgment, and recent decisions by the Senate Armed Services Committee...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - In 1960, when he was 22, Hayim Sheynin escaped from a sunken Soviet submarine by swimming into a frigid darkness that went on and on and on. Now head of the reference library at Gratz College in Elkins Park, Pa., Sheynin has been remembering the terror of his ordeal as he has been reading accounts of the sailors trapped aboard the Kursk. Like the Kursk, Sheynin's vessel sank in stormy Arctic waters after an explosion. Because of the Cold War, the Soviet government kept a lid on the incident.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 2001
By accident, scientists peering into icy waters far beneath the North Pole have found a hidden world of fire. Buried in sonar readings taken by a Navy submarine to create a map of the ocean floor, researchers discovered two large volcanoes that had recently convulsed the Arctic seabed. The surprise, reported in the current issue of the journal Nature, throws light on one of the last ocean frontiers, the Arctic deep. "We like to think we're smart people," said Dr. Margo H. Edwards, a marine geologist at the University of Hawaii who led the discovery team.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 29, 2011
Capt. Frank J. Coulter, a retired decorated career naval officer who commanded the submarine USS Skipjack in the Pacific Theater during World War II, died June 21 of respiratory failure at his Severna Park home. He was 93. The son of a police officer and a homemaker, Captain Coulter was born in Baltimore and raised in Canton, and later in the 1600 block of N. Broadway. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1935, he earned his bachelor's degree from the Naval Academy in 1939.
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