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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 4, 1992
Lou Stovall has had a silk-screen printmaking studio in Washington since 1968, and in the intervening 23 years has made prints for about 80 artists, by his own estimate. Last year a group show of works by some of those artists, and Stovall himself, opened at the African-American Atelier in Greensboro, N.C., and then went to the Corcoran Gallery in Washington.A smaller version of that show has opened at Dundalk Community College in celebration of Black History Month. Called "Heroes, Teachers and Friends," it contains 24 works by Stovall and 11 colleagues for whom he has made silk-screen prints of their works, including such famous artists as Jacob Lawrence, Elizabeth Catlett and Sam Gilliam.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
The 2011 Maryland Film Festival showcases an extraordinary number of movies by filmmakers who grew up in Baltimore or have adopted it as their hometown. Here are a feature director, a documentary maker and a creator of avant-garde fantasy talking about making movies in Mobtown. Josh Slates' "Small Pond" is about a girl who's floundering in the provincial life of Columbia, Mo. Slates says he filmed it in the summer of 2009 as part of a brief homecoming and sabbatical in the Show-Me State.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
The versatility of one medium will be on display, beginning Saturday, at the School 33 Art Center. Declaring Space: Recent Drawings by Baltimore Artists, part of the city's annual Artscape celebration, is a group show that features disparate drawing styles, techniques and subject matter. Each artist's body of work is different, from gestural figure compositions to sketches of graphic forms, but all of the pieces give the viewer a glimpse into the creative processes behind the drawing.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
By the time students get to Matthew Finck's 11th-grade U.S. history class, the Civil War and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln are vague memories, historical facts they haven't heard about since eighth grade. Beyond a very simplistic view of the causes, "they have no knowledge of the Civil War," Finck said. The Catonsville High School teacher does a basic review before he begins teaching his course, which covers the period from 1877 to today. But many of those students will never take another course in U.S. history because most colleges don't require them.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
New -- Artists' Gallery in the American City Building, 10227 Wincopin circle, Columbia, will show Explorations, an all-member show focused on the artists' pursuit of new media, style, subject matter and perspectives, from Monday through Aug. 24. A reception is planned from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, and by appointment. 410-740-8349.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 13, 1991
It may be because content restrictions made more imaginative artists decline the opportunity to submit. Or it may be something else. Whatever the cause or causes, the First Annual Visual Arts Competition of the Columbia Festival of the Arts (through June 22) has turned out to be tame, ultra-conservative and thoroughly boring.It is not about issues, it is not about imagination, it is not about creativity, and it is certainly not about anything contemporary. It is about technical ability and safe, old-fashioned, tiresomely familiar subject matter: boats at the water's edge, animals, still life, flowers, here and there a person.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 31, 2002
Wilson's `Ma Rainey' at Arena Players Ma Rainey's Black Bottom - the 1920s installment of August Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of the African-American experience in the 20th century - opens tomorrow at Arena Players. Wilson's first Broadway play is set in a 1927 Chicago recording studio where the famed blues singer fights to win the respect of the white recording industry, for which she is already a major moneymaker. Wynonia Rhock heads a cast that features Jonathan Claiborne, O'Bryant Kenner, Archie Williams Jr. and Sean Yoes, under the direction of Amini Johari-Courts.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 1, 1990
"Grace Hartigan: New Paintings and Works on Paper" at the C. Grimaldis Gallery (through Dec. 1) leaves a number of impressions but the primary one is of freedom. Hartigan was always a strong painter, but at times there was a sense of struggle about her work, a feeling of self-imposed order which was to some degree at odds with her essence as a painter.Sometimes this imposed order took the form of subject matter. Even at their most abstract, Hartigan's paintings had subject matter, but there were times, particularly in the 1970s and with some of the history-of-art works, when subject matter became so intrusive that the works became too descriptive.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 17, 1990
Most non-theme group shows don't leave overall impressions so much as thoughts of single works liked, or others disliked. This year's "Faculty Exhibition" at the Maryland Institute, College of Art (through Nov. 11), is an exception.Oh, there are single works liked, all right, and others not so much. But there are general impressions as well. As always, the capability of this group is a given, and as always its disinclination to shock -- with the new, the bold, the controversial -- is also evident.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 4, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The federal ethics agency told government workers yesterday that they could not accept payment for writing articles or giving speeches, even if the subject is unrelated to their work.Under the new policy, for example, a State Department official or Social Security worker would be prohibited from taking money for a magazine article on coin collecting or for a lecture on orchids.Government employee unions say thousands of federal workers engage in such activities in their off-duty time and will be affected by the ban."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | April 15, 2008
Center Stage never has been a theater company for wimps, and the slate of six shows to be staged during the 2008-2009 season has the potential to deliver a powerful left hook. Four of the six shows scheduled for next season take as their subject matter such dark themes as incest, race relations and a terrifyingly toxic marriage. Things lighten up for the first show of the season - a classic light romance - and the last, a mischievous new comedy about backstage antics. The season contains the qualities that have become Center Stage hallmarks during Irene Lewis' 17-year tenure as the troupe's artistic director.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
New -- Artists' Gallery in the American City Building, 10227 Wincopin circle, Columbia, will show Explorations, an all-member show focused on the artists' pursuit of new media, style, subject matter and perspectives, from Monday through Aug. 24. A reception is planned from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, and by appointment. 410-740-8349.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2005
Every year, most metropolitan newspapers will produce several multipart series. It is certain that the first part of a series will receive a large, splashy treatment on the front page, that the package will contain at least two full inside pages and that readers will be asked to make a major investment in time. Critics see many of these big projects as exercises in journalistic vanity, saying they are disconnected from community concerns or interests and designed more to be read by journalism contest judges than readers.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 14, 2005
Hooking Up is the story of what happens to 11 young women in Manhattan when image and text are transformed into flesh and blood in the unpredictable world of online dating. Produced by the ABC News team that in 2000 took viewers inside the Johns Hopkins Hospital in a series called Hopkins 24/7, the five-part documentary is an addictive and illuminating look at courtship in the age of the Internet. It also may serve as a model for journalistically sound, nonfiction drama that's compelling enough to compete in the ratings-driven world of prime-time network television.
NEWS
By Michael J. Korzi | March 13, 2005
RECENTLY, THE FIRST "blogger" was given credentials by the White House to attend the daily press briefings. The implication is that bloggers have a status similar to that of journalists. Naturally, this makes mainstream journalists react with hand-wringing, worrying that their professionalism is being compromised by "quasi-journalists," or worse. Before addressing the larger issues of the relationship between bloggers and journalism, key concepts need to be made clear. "Blog" is short for "Web log" and generally connotes an online journal that is managed by one person or a group of individuals (bloggers)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
The versatility of one medium will be on display, beginning Saturday, at the School 33 Art Center. Declaring Space: Recent Drawings by Baltimore Artists, part of the city's annual Artscape celebration, is a group show that features disparate drawing styles, techniques and subject matter. Each artist's body of work is different, from gestural figure compositions to sketches of graphic forms, but all of the pieces give the viewer a glimpse into the creative processes behind the drawing.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 3, 1991
About three quarters of the way through "Henry Ossawa Tanner" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (through April 14) there is a painting that may be Tanner's most distinct and modern."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 3, 1993
Arvie Smith's paintings, in the current regional exhibit at University of Maryland Baltimore County, stick with you. His vivid colors, his active line, his figures shown close up so that they're right in your face, and his combination of topical subject matter and art historical references make his canvases arresting and unforgettable.Smith's "Strange Fruit" is a visual rendering of Billie Holiday's song about lynching. Its central figure, a black man with a rope around his neck, has the faraway look in his eyes of martyrs from Renaissance paintings, and his hooded killers show by the trousers and shoes that stick out beneath their gowns that they're people who will be walking around among us tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 22, 2002
"So, when was your last HIV test?" -- Natalie (played by Melissa DeSousa) in the UPN sitcom One on One On the same early December day that Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley declared a "state of emergency" in the battle against HIV / AIDS, a group of Hollywood writers and producers finalized the script for a prime-time television show set in Baltimore that treats the HIV / AIDS crisis as an integral fact of life. You could call it art imitating life. But forget about art. This is television as a social force for the good: Producers -- in this case, of a sitcom that is often described as silly -- exhibiting conscience and using their series to tackle a stark reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 31, 2002
Wilson's `Ma Rainey' at Arena Players Ma Rainey's Black Bottom - the 1920s installment of August Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of the African-American experience in the 20th century - opens tomorrow at Arena Players. Wilson's first Broadway play is set in a 1927 Chicago recording studio where the famed blues singer fights to win the respect of the white recording industry, for which she is already a major moneymaker. Wynonia Rhock heads a cast that features Jonathan Claiborne, O'Bryant Kenner, Archie Williams Jr. and Sean Yoes, under the direction of Amini Johari-Courts.
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