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October 24, 2002
Candlelight Concerts will open its 2002-2003 season of chamber music with a performance by the Guarneri String Quartet at 8 p.m. Saturday in Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. The quartet, resident at the University of Maryland, was formed in 1964 at the Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont. The group has played in the Americas, Mexico, Europe, Asia and Australia, and been featured on television and radio specials and in documentaries. Its members have been interviewed by Charles Kuralt on CBS's Sunday Morning and are the subject of a 1989 full-length film and several books.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2014
Here's another thing: The attack ad on Larry Hogan that claims Anthony Brown's Republican challenger for governor wants to give a $300 million tax break to corporations at the expense of kindergartners - that's another stretch into the shady side by the Democrats, and for a couple of reasons. First of all, Hogan hasn't said any such thing yet, although, being a mainstream Republican businessman, he says he would cut Maryland's corporate tax rate, and we all know the story there: You can't be a Republican without saying you want to cut taxes.
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FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Robert Kanigel knows you can never really be sure how things happened. Memory tends to edit and improve life's important encounters as they recede in time.That's why he asked an old girlfriend a few years ago if indeed his change of direction occurred as he remembered it. Did he come to her 27 years ago and declare definitively, purposefully, maybe even melodramatically: "I'm going to be a writer?""That's the way it was," she said, or words to that effect.Kanigel explains how he was walking along 25th Street that day in 1970, his mind a turbulence of ideas about the explosive Sixties, "those years when the world was turned upside down."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2001
This summer, the words, "Hi! How Are You?" were cause for alarm if you owned a PC. A little over a year after the Internet's most catastrophic computer virus struck in the form of a love note e-mailed around the globe, the world's computers have been battered again by a series of bugs with equally friendly subject lines. The latest bugs, whose mischief ranges from erasing files from your hard drive to providing strangers with access to your computer, represent unprecedented levels of sophistication in what they do and how they attack, according to those who follow virus trends.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | February 22, 2006
At first glance, Valeska Populoh's fancy formal ball gowns look like something lifted straight out of a John Singer Sargent portrait. As upper-class bling, these ornate confections are artworks in their own right: The lines are perfect, the fabrics luxurious and the style impeccable. Each seems to reek of old money and manners. But step closer and the illusion fades. The frilly ruffles, delicate pleats, form-enhancing bustles and other extravagant ornaments of the couturier's art actually are stitched together from bits of plastic garbage bag, black umbrella cloth, old coat linings, carpet scraps and other thrift-store detritus.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 7, 1996
After many years hidden behind a lot of stereotypes, the African-American male's complexity and humanity are gradually becoming more visible. The Million Man March last year was about the black male in America, and a year ago New York's Whitney Museum presented a major exhibition, "Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art." It would be great to have a good local show devoted to the same subject, but unfortunately "Portraits of Our Lives" at School 33 isn't it.The fault may not lie wholly with curator Sharon Stainback.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 23, 1997
"Terra Firma" at the University of Maryland College Park brings together the work of six women whose subject matter is women. Specifically, it deals with issues of concern to women through addressing itself to the subject of the body.The results range from the horrifying to the funny, in one case within the work of a single artist. Three pieces from a series of life-sized drawings on vellum by Faith Wilding deal with the issue rape and were occasioned by the rapes of women in the Bosnian War. "Forced Pregnancy Dress," "Raped Dress" and "Infected Dress" display repellent stains that speak graphically of the violence of rape; they are so repulsive that they are almost impossible to look at, and as such entirely appropriate to the subject.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 12, 1998
Consider Pablo Picasso and Abbie Hoffman.The legendary modern artist and the 1960s radical would seem to have nothing in common. But both have been portrayed on stage by Paul Provenza, actor and stand-up comedian. And he isn't joking when he points out shared characteristics."They were incredibly passionate, incredibly dedicated to their endeavors," says Provenza, who played Hoffman in a 1994 Los Angeles production of a play called "The Chicago Conspiracy Trial" and is currently playing Picasso in Steve Martin's "Picasso at the Lapin Agile."
NEWS
May 29, 2005
Advice, reflections and future plans from some of the valedictorians from county high schools: Nicholas Patrick Parents: John and Nancy Patrick School: C. Milton Wright Hometown: Bel Air College attending: Duke University "Love it!" subject: Biology "Blecch!" subject: English If your classmates described you in one word: Diligent What do you want to be when you grow up? Scientific researcher Advice for incoming freshmen: Try to challenge yourself as much as possible because high school prepares you for college and the world.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A city councilman is pushing a bill that would require every restaurant in Baltimore to post a health grade based on the facility's cleanliness — but some restaurants are pushing back. "We know this policy has been proven across the country to be effective," says City Councilman Brandon Scott, who cites similar efforts in New York, San Francisco and Charlotte, N.C. "It's about transparency. It's about education. It's embarrassing that in 2014 the only way a citizen can see the inspection results in our city is to call 311 and wait for the Health Department to give it to them.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 5, 2014
Comedian Joan Rivers once talked about how she came of age in the mid 1960s with Richard Pryor, Bill Cosby, Woody Allen and George Carlin in comedy clubs in Greenwich Village, where Johnny Carson's people would troll for new talent. She recalled that she was the last of the group to make it to "The Tonight Show," the last of the pack "allowed" to break through. "When I started out, a pretty girl did not go into comedy," she said. "I never was one of the guys, I was never asked to go hang out. "Looking back, I think it was because I was a woman, I was the very last one of the group they put on the Carson show.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel is asked to approve a $40,000 settlement on charges that city officers falsely arrested a man and committed assault and battery against him at his Glen Oaks apartment. Alex Dickson, the plaintiff in the case, received significant injuries to his teeth, nose and ribs after three officers came to his apartment on Aug. 13, 2010 with his girlfriend under the terms of a protective order so she could retrieve some personal items. When the group arrived, Dickson used his body to block Officer James Wilder from crossing the threshold when Wilder grabbed Dickson and placed him under arrest, according to the settlement memo presented to the Board of Estimates.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Two families who say they are linked through police brutality filed separate lawsuits against the Baltimore Police Department on Monday, alleging that two officers involved in an in-custody death should not have been on duty. Abdul Salaam, 36, says he was beaten in July 2013 after a traffic stop by Officers Nicholas Chapman and Jorge Bernardez-Ruiz and that he never got a response to his complaint filed with internal affairs. Those officers would be implicated less than three weeks later in the death of 44-year-old Tyrone West while he was in police custody.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
The rideshare company Uber has launched services in Annapolis, despite having threatened to leave Maryland over potential regulatory changes. The company, which connects users of its smartphone app to drivers looking for fares and handles all associated transactions electronically, already operates in Baltimore. It opened all its services - uberX, UberBlack and UberSUV - to the Annapolis market Wednesday. Shwetha Rajashekara, Uber's general manager for Maryland, said the company has watched interest in its app grow in Annapolis and thought this weekend, with Naval Academy events underway, would be a good time to launch in the state capital.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
There is no way to overestimate the fear felt by WMAR staff members recently when they experienced what could have seemed to be a terrorist attack ( "Man is held after standoff at WMAR," May 14). News outlets cover trauma all the time, and it can never be far from their minds. The live broadcast of the aftermath, extending well into the evening prime-time news hour, gave a vivid illustration of the impact of trauma even on those who may feel they are ready for it. Long after it seemed certain that no one was injured and that the assailant was likely unarmed, a clearly upset newsman was, at times breathlessly, leading viewers around the damaged building.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 17, 1992
An experiment was conducted recently to test the theory that white men can't jump.The experiment was conducted on a playground basketball court. The subject was a white, 40-year-old newspaperman of average height. The object was to see if the newspaperman could dunk the ball.What follows are the results of that experiment:Attempt No. 1 -- Standing at half-court and cradling the ball loosely in both hands, subject lumbers toward basket.Achieving what one onlooker describes as "the docking speed of the Queen Mary," subject plants left foot at foul line and leaps.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 26, 1995
At last talk radio has found a subject worthy of it: talk radio.If the Group of Seven cannot manage the dollar-yen relationship or even try, it cannot justify the cost of meeting.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Anne Arundel Republican county executive candidates Laura Neuman and Steve Schuh traded barbs in a debate this week in Annapolis. Neuman, who was appointed county executive to replace John R. Leopold last year, and Schuh, a two-term state delegate, have been duking it out in the GOP primary for months. Neuman used Monday's debate to attack Schuh for his actions as a state legislator and his campaign tactics. She mentioned multiple times that Schuh voted for the state law that requires Anne Arundel and other jurisdictions to charge a stormwater remediation fee — dubbed a "rain tax" by detractors — to pay for pollution-reduction programs.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
The people of Egypt have set their eyes on a dark horse presidential candidate. He's ambitious, comfortable with world leaders and comfortable in front of a camera.  Very comfortable. Kevin Spacey is the subject of a tongue-in-cheek write-in campaign to be Egypt's next president. Doctored "House of Cards" promotional photos started floating around the internet last week. They show Spacey, in character as ruthless American politician Frank Underwood, with Egyptian campaign slogans.
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