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NEWS
September 17, 1991
It is an irony of Philippine history that the country seems ready to turn down a base treaty with the United States just at the point when the base is no longer coveted as a crucial link in U.S. defenses against a hostile Soviet Union. The Philippine Senate has failed to ratify a new 10-year lease for Subic Bay Naval Station, but President Corazon Aquino, with the support of the Bush administration, is calling for a referendum on the issue.The task of replicating Subic Bay would be a burden for the United States.
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NEWS
January 6, 1997
THE NAVAL Surface Warfare Center and Subic Bay could not be more different. The 42-acre facility on the Severn has been a center of serious research; the Philippines town outside a U.S. Navy base was famous for its raunchiness. Then four years ago, the U.S. Navy sailed away and most everyone thought Subic Bay would die. It didn't, though. It became a tax-free haven for foreign manufacturers. Today, Subic Bay is hailed as one of the most successful retooling efforts of an old Navy base.Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary wants to perform a similar miracle at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, a facility that was established in 1903 and at one time employed as many as 1,400 researchers, support staff and military personnel.
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NEWS
January 6, 1997
THE NAVAL Surface Warfare Center and Subic Bay could not be more different. The 42-acre facility on the Severn has been a center of serious research; the Philippines town outside a U.S. Navy base was famous for its raunchiness. Then four years ago, the U.S. Navy sailed away and most everyone thought Subic Bay would die. It didn't, though. It became a tax-free haven for foreign manufacturers. Today, Subic Bay is hailed as one of the most successful retooling efforts of an old Navy base.Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary wants to perform a similar miracle at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, a facility that was established in 1903 and at one time employed as many as 1,400 researchers, support staff and military personnel.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1996
SUBIC BAY FREEPORT, Philippines -- When the U.S. Navy steamed away four years ago from this port, Roberto Magno fretted he might never find skilled work again. He went from being a mechanic in a Navy machine shop to sitting home for months, collecting severance pay from the U.S. government. Eventually, he sold fish to make ends meet.Magno is now back at work in the same machine shop where he once repaired engines for the U.S. military. As an employee of a new British-Filipino venture, Magno helps build 2-ton, British-designed armored personnel carriers for the Philippine army.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 16, 1992
SINGAPORE -- The U.S. Navy's Seventh Fleet command center is getting a new home, rent-free, and the landlord is sprucing up the place before the new tenant arrives.Moving out of its longtime home at Subic Bay Naval Base because the Philippine government rejected a new lease on the base, the fleet's command task force will come to Singapore, President Bush announced during a recent visit here. The move is part of a U.S. shift to smaller, cheaper military arrangements in Southeast Asia.The fleet's new home could hardly be more different from its old one.There is no public opposition here to the permanent presence of U.S. military personnel, as there was in the Philippines.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The nation's strategic nuclear forces would be largely unaffected by a U.S. military pullout from the Philippines because the Air Force and Navy have not based nuclear weapons there for years, anti-nuclear activists and military experts said yesterday."
NEWS
June 24, 1991
No sensible estimate of the continuing U.S. interest in its mighty Philippines bases is possible until Mount Pinatubo goes back to sleep. Far from doing that, vulcanologists say, it is preparing more eruptions. Clark Air Base, 10 miles from the volcano, is useless. Subic Bay Naval Station, 35 miles from it, is covered in ash, its normal electricity out. Some hundred buildings at the two bases are wrecked. Filipinos cannot learn from U.S. authorities whether to be worried about nuclear or other damage because whatever is there is shrouded in military secrecy as well as white powdery ash.Officially, the U.S. and the Philippines insist that their base lease renegotiation is not suspended.
NEWS
July 18, 1991
Mount Pinatubo solved problems for the United States and the Philippines. Its destructive power forced the U.S. base lease negotiations into a compromise for a continued but reduced American military presence, which reflects the interests of both countries.The U.S. is leaving Clark Air Base in September 1992, 91 years after its original use as a cavalry post in the U.S. conquest. Clark became the prototype of the overseas American base, an enclave of Americana and high technology in exotic climes.
NEWS
June 26, 1992
Gen. Fidel Ramos deserves the support of all Filipinos as their next president. Only 23.5 percent of those voting wanted him in the job, but he got the biggest plurality. Handing presidential power to such a slim winner over six opponents, without a run-off, leaves much to be desired, but the Philippines congress and courts made clear there is no alternative. His succession to Corazon Aquino on next Tuesday will be the first smooth transition in the country in 26 years and a tribute to her achievement in completing an elected term.
NEWS
By Bob Drogin and Bob Drogin,Los Angeles Times | June 16, 1991
ANGELES, Philippines -- Hundreds of thousands of people fled in terror yesterday from the combined wrath of an angry volcano, numerous earthquakes and a fierce typhoon that washed out bridges, destroyed homes, flooded villages and scattered thick ash for hundreds of miles.In an awesome display of nature's power, day turned as black as midnight by midafternoon across central Luzon island and as far south as Manila as a relentless, hard rain of golf-ball-sized pumice, pebbles and ash poured down.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 21, 1993
OLONGAPO, Philippines -- Next to her son James, what Lucia Villegas Hill prizes most may be a handful of documents identifying his father as a U.S. sailor at the Navy base that shut down here last year."
NEWS
June 26, 1992
Gen. Fidel Ramos deserves the support of all Filipinos as their next president. Only 23.5 percent of those voting wanted him in the job, but he got the biggest plurality. Handing presidential power to such a slim winner over six opponents, without a run-off, leaves much to be desired, but the Philippines congress and courts made clear there is no alternative. His succession to Corazon Aquino on next Tuesday will be the first smooth transition in the country in 26 years and a tribute to her achievement in completing an elected term.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 16, 1992
SINGAPORE -- The U.S. Navy's Seventh Fleet command center is getting a new home, rent-free, and the landlord is sprucing up the place before the new tenant arrives.Moving out of its longtime home at Subic Bay Naval Base because the Philippine government rejected a new lease on the base, the fleet's command task force will come to Singapore, President Bush announced during a recent visit here. The move is part of a U.S. shift to smaller, cheaper military arrangements in Southeast Asia.The fleet's new home could hardly be more different from its old one.There is no public opposition here to the permanent presence of U.S. military personnel, as there was in the Philippines.
NEWS
September 17, 1991
It is an irony of Philippine history that the country seems ready to turn down a base treaty with the United States just at the point when the base is no longer coveted as a crucial link in U.S. defenses against a hostile Soviet Union. The Philippine Senate has failed to ratify a new 10-year lease for Subic Bay Naval Station, but President Corazon Aquino, with the support of the Bush administration, is calling for a referendum on the issue.The task of replicating Subic Bay would be a burden for the United States.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The nation's strategic nuclear forces would be largely unaffected by a U.S. military pullout from the Philippines because the Air Force and Navy have not based nuclear weapons there for years, anti-nuclear activists and military experts said yesterday."
NEWS
September 10, 1991
President Corazon Aquino favors the base rights treaty with the United States and stakes the final prestige of her waning Philippines presidency on it. Most of the Filipino people favor it and know the closing of Subic Bay Naval Base would have a ripple effect through hundreds of thousands of jobs. But it seems unlikely that 16 Filipino senators will favor it, and that is the number needed to ratify the treaty -- two-thirds or more of the 23 members of the Philippines Senate.The old treaty expires this month.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 21, 1993
OLONGAPO, Philippines -- Next to her son James, what Lucia Villegas Hill prizes most may be a handful of documents identifying his father as a U.S. sailor at the Navy base that shut down here last year."
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The devastating volcanic explosions in the Philippines have forced U.S. officials to consider moving many of the military operations there to other Asian and Pacific sites in an arrangement that could become permanent.Some officials already believe that Mount Pinatubo, which literally blew its top and inundated two huge U.S. facilities with volcanic ash, has caused irreparable damage to Clark Air Base and severely crippled Subic Bay Naval Station."Everything's disrupted there," one senior Navy officer at the Pentagon said last week.
NEWS
July 18, 1991
Mount Pinatubo solved problems for the United States and the Philippines. Its destructive power forced the U.S. base lease negotiations into a compromise for a continued but reduced American military presence, which reflects the interests of both countries.The U.S. is leaving Clark Air Base in September 1992, 91 years after its original use as a cavalry post in the U.S. conquest. Clark became the prototype of the overseas American base, an enclave of Americana and high technology in exotic climes.
NEWS
June 24, 1991
No sensible estimate of the continuing U.S. interest in its mighty Philippines bases is possible until Mount Pinatubo goes back to sleep. Far from doing that, vulcanologists say, it is preparing more eruptions. Clark Air Base, 10 miles from the volcano, is useless. Subic Bay Naval Station, 35 miles from it, is covered in ash, its normal electricity out. Some hundred buildings at the two bases are wrecked. Filipinos cannot learn from U.S. authorities whether to be worried about nuclear or other damage because whatever is there is shrouded in military secrecy as well as white powdery ash.Officially, the U.S. and the Philippines insist that their base lease renegotiation is not suspended.
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