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By Terry Foy and Inside Lacrosse | July 2, 2014
It was a tumultuous spring off the field for the NCAA, and the effect could change college lacrosse in substantial ways. The consensus to this point, however, is that there's still so much to be determined that it's impossible to project how lacrosse fans should ready themselves for the future. How this future looks could hinge on the development of two major storylines that might reshape college athletics: In late March, a National Labor Relations Board regional director decided that members of the Northwestern football team were, based on the nature of their work (playing a sport)
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SPORTS
By Terry Foy and Inside Lacrosse | July 2, 2014
It was a tumultuous spring off the field for the NCAA, and the effect could change college lacrosse in substantial ways. The consensus to this point, however, is that there's still so much to be determined that it's impossible to project how lacrosse fans should ready themselves for the future. How this future looks could hinge on the development of two major storylines that might reshape college athletics: In late March, a National Labor Relations Board regional director decided that members of the Northwestern football team were, based on the nature of their work (playing a sport)
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NEWS
September 23, 1992
County Council members, sitting as the Zoning Board, will hear testimony tonight on a planned 65-acre subdivision near Harper's Choice village.The county Planning Board on June 23 endorsed plans for the development by Woodlot Enterprises Inc., but stopped short of giving its recommendation to the County Council on the zoning needed for the project. The subdivision of 32 town houses and 95 detached houses on quarter-acre and one-fifth-acre lots would be built on what is known as the Carroll property, off Harper's Farm Road between the Hobbit's Glen and Swansfield neighborhoods.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2014
After Towson's 35-7 loss to North Dakota State in the Football Championship Subdivision title game, coach Rob Ambrose didn't act differently at the postgame news conference than he had in the past. He parried with the media, told a few jokes and expressed his pride in his players. Standing outside the team's locker room at Toyota Stadium, however, the full impact of the Tigers' worst loss since 2010 finally caught up to Ambrose, who was asked how long it would take for him to appreciate what the program had accomplished this season.
NEWS
January 23, 2003
Developers planning subdivisions in eastern Howard County or projects that require conditional-use permission must meet with neighbors before submitting plans to the county. The next scheduled meetings are: Monday at 5 p.m. at Mildenberg, Boender & Associates Inc., 5072 Dorsey Hall Drive, Suite 202, Ellicott City, about a proposal for four homes on 2.38 acres on the OCHS Property, 5500 Montgomery Road. Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. at Land Design and Development Inc., 8000 Main St., Ellicott City, about a proposal for three homes on 3.09 acres on the Fincham Property, 4920 Bonnie Branch Road.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 21, 1992
The Office of Planning and Zoning will meet Aug. 13 to review preliminary plans for a 5-acre subdivision near Riviera Isle.According to plans submitted to the county, the Amherst subdivision would be built on the northeast intersection of Fort Smallwood and Elizabeth roads. Plans call for 10 single-family homes valued at between $125,000 and $149,000, with three or four bedrooms. Lots will be a little less than a half-acre.Plans were submitted by the property's owner, American Savings Bank, at 4023 Annapolis Road.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | December 13, 1993
Disputes with two developers have prompted Carroll County government to consider punishing developers who change subdivision plans without Planning Commission approval.The county commissioners appear ready to adopt the county's first fine for violating subdivision regulations."We're about as wide open on penalties as you'll see any county," Planning Director Edmund R. Cueman told the commissioners at a recent briefing on the proposal.Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Elmer C. Lippy endorsed the changes to create a possible penalty and authorize the Planning Commission to require an amended plat where the developer is found to have made substantial unauthorized changes.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2004
A reader owns a home in an 18-lot subdivision. The lots were sold subject to a declaration of restrictions recorded by the developer. The restrictions prohibit lot owners from erecting temporary structures. If a lot owner wants to construct a fence, wall or other structure or materially change the exterior appearance of a home, written plans and specifications for the project must be submitted and approved by the developer. The restrictions also prohibit lot owners from keeping commercial trucks or junk cars on their lots; prohibit raising animals for commercial purposes, and establish other regulations designed to "insure the maintenance of residential property values" for owners of lots in the subdivision.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 17, 1995
County officials have unveiled a proposed overhaul of Anne Arundel's 25-year-old subdivision ordinance, saying the changes would force developers to deal with crucial issues at the outset while offering more chances for public scrutiny of plans.It also would halve the time for a subdivision proposal to move through the bureaucracy.What is a two-step process for developers would become three steps, involving sketch plans, preliminary plans and final plans. Builders would be told at the start what issues they should resolve before returning with preliminary plans, said Joseph Elbrich, assistant planning and code enforcement director for development.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 27, 1992
A hearing on a planned 65-acre subdivision near Harper's Choice village in Columbia was put off last week for insufficient public notice.County Council members, sitting as the Zoning Board, were to hear testimony Wednesday on the development proposed by Woodlot Enterprises Inc. Because a legally required advertisement did not appear in the Howard County Sun, the hearing had to be postponed until Tuesday.The meeting will be held in the Banneker Room of the George Howard county office building, starting at 8:30 p.m. If needed, a second hearing would be held Oct. 29 at 8 p.m.The subdivision of 32 town houses and 95 detached houses on xTC quarter-acre and one-fifth-acre lots would be built on what is known as the Carroll property, off Harper's Farm Road between the Hobbit's Glen and Swansfield neighborhoods.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
The Towson football team's bid for a third straight Colonial Athletic Association title fell short, but enduring that conference has the team feeling confident about its chances in the Football Championship Subdivision tournament. The Tigers compiled a 10-2 overall record and a 6-2 league mark, and although they ended up trailing Maine (10-2, 7-1), they were awarded the No. 7 seed by the NCAA selection committee. They will play host to Fordham (12-1) Saturday at 1 p.m. at Johnny Unitas Stadium.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
College football has long been an afterthought in Maryland. At best, it's been a pleasant Saturday interlude between the buildup during the week and the battles that usually take place the next day for the Baltimore Ravens and Washington Redskins. At worst, it's been an occasional blip on the national consciousness. Things won't change dramatically because two of the state's Division I football teams - Maryland and Towson - are both unbeaten and nationally ranked in their respective subdivisions.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Maryland's game against Old Dominion on Saturday marks the beginning of the end of an era. The Terps plan to phase out games against Football Championship Subdivision opponents in the coming years. But Maryland (1-0, 0-0 Atlantic Coast Conference) knows better than to relax against the Monarchs. The Terps ' own history - and recent upsets of other major-conference teams by FCS schools - show them why it's not a good idea to overlook Old Dominion. Last week, eight FCS schools upset Football Bowl Subdivision squads, including Towson over Connecticut, 33-18; Eastern Washington over Oregon State, 49-46; and North Dakota State over Kansas State, 24-21.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
— Joining the Big Ten means that Maryland's football team will soon have Penn State, Ohio State, Michigan and other schools as new division opponents. But it also means the school's nonconference schedules are being upgraded and that some previously-scheduled games could be dropped. The Big Ten wants Maryland — which joins the conference in 2014 — and its other members to stop scheduling Football Championship Subdivision opponents. As a result, according to multiple officials, Maryland may drop at least some of their planned games with FCS schools in future seasons.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
A year after leading Towson to its first Football Championship Subdivision appearance in school history, fourth-year coach Rob Ambrose reacted angrily Sunday after his 7-4 Tigers were snubbed by the NCAA selection committee for an invitation to this season's playoffs. Despite finishing the season on a four-game winning streak, including a 64-35 demolition of playoff-bound New Hampshire in Durham, N.H., Saturday, Towson failed to be invited into the 20-team field after losing in the opening round to Lehigh in 2011.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Marge Cissel is pressing her right index finger into the cover of a white loose-leaf binder containing a new state law limiting the use of septic systems, urging restricted development rights for some farm property. She's had the binder for months now, adding up what the law means for the value of her family's 310 acres in the Lisbon area, and she's angry. "This is not compensation," says Cissel, who with her husband, Lambert, started the Kimberthy Turf Farm 50 years ago. "This is legalized stealing.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
A national homebuilder paid almost $20 million for land in two Anne Arundel County locations that are both approved for development, a local land brokerage said Monday. The Annapolis-based Hogan Cos. said it represented builder D.R. Horton in the purchase last week from Koch Development. It was the biggest acquisition of unimproved land in Anne Arundel this year, Hogan said. D.R. Horton could not be reached for comment. Hogan said the builder bought Canterbury Village, 130 lots off Jones Station Road in Arnold, and Millstone Village, 116 lots between Reece Road and Loving Road in Severn.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
As a professional in the Maryland home building business, I urge members of the Maryland General Assembly to oppose Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposal to limit new residential subdivisions served by septic systems (SB 236/ HB 445 - The Governor's Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act). If approved, the bill would have negative effects on our industry and would kill jobs. It takes planning authority away from local governments by requiring counties to add "growth tiers" into their comprehensive plans by the end of this year or else many of their septic subdivisions will be denied.
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