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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
The bowling alley business dream of Baltimore Ravens star Ray Lewis lies half-built in a far corner of the Hunt Valley Town Centre. Cinder blocks and plywood cover the entrances and windows; rubble and metal vents sit piled inside a chain-link fence. Lewis announced MVP Lanes with great fanfare more than two years ago. It was supposed to include a posh sports-themed bowling alley, restaurant, sushi bar and live radio booth - and create more than 100 service and construction jobs on the site of a former Wal-Mart.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A federal judge ordered on Tuesday two former lead contractors on Maryland's health exchange into arbitration to settle their differences. Noridian Healthcare Solutions, once the exchange's prime contractor, and EngagePoint Inc., its main subcontractor, had been tied up in a court battle since shortly after the exchange's botched launch Oct. 1. The judge in the U.S. District Court for Maryland said a contract the two had singed in April 2012...
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
General Dynamics Corp. and its subcontractors expect to hire as many as 110 workers in Baltimore County who will work on computer systems for a new government program that will help retirees receive health care coverage, officials said Thursday. The defense contractor said Thursday that its information technology division won an $80 million award to work on the Department of Health and Human Services' Early Retiree Reinsurance Program. The program is part of the health care reform package that was passed this year and is intended to help retirees who are not yet eligible for Medicare obtain affordable insurance.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
SKW Constructors plans to hire up to 100 people to construct concrete tubes and fans at the Sparrows Point Shipyard and Industrial park in Dundalk, according to Baltimore County economic development officials. Subcontractors are expected to hire additional people to work on the project, including carpenters, mechanics, surveyors and truck drivers, the county said. "This project is a huge boost in our efforts to bring new businesses and new jobs back to Sparrows Point," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said in a statement.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
The cable television subcontractors who pierced a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. natural gas pipeline in Westminster two hours before a nearby house exploded last month did not violate any state occupational health and safety guidelines, according to state officials.In a report released yesterday, Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) said that neither Apollo Trenching Co. -- the Howard County company whose digging equipment struck the gas main Jan. 19 -- nor Prestige Cable Television of Maryland put employees at undue risk that afternoon.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | March 11, 1991
Concern about the perception of possible bid-tampering has prompted the Schmoke administration to seek a revision in the bidding process for highly competitive and often lucrative city contracts.Mayor Kurt Schmoke agreed to a request that he seek the change, but he says he fears it could threaten the constitutionality of the city's minority set-aside law. The proposed change would affect the way prime contractors select minority subcontractors under the minority set-aside law.The set-aside law requires prime contractors to give minority subcontractors work equaling 20 percent of the bid. Three percent of the bid is earmarked for firms owned by women.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns DHC jB | November 19, 1991
A major homebuilder's attempt to shift the cost of construction safety violations to its Maryland subcontractors has prompted protests and a call for state legislation to define responsibility for the fines.Subcontractors fear that the total shift in liability to them could spell their economic ruin and thwart the intent of state and federal job safety rules by completely exculpating big builders.The state's job safety agency says the legal move may impair enforcement of the law against prime contractors, who share responsibility for worker protection.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 1996
With the nation's airlines farming out an increasing amount of maintenance work, the Federal Aviation Administration is struggling to monitor an intricate web of contractors that stretches around the world.Before deregulation of the industry in 1978, airlines did most of their work themselves, making it relatively simple for regulators to examine records and aircraft to ensure that procedures were being followed properly.But now that task is far more complicated than experts predicted even five years ago.U.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
The Baltimore Health Department failed to collect financial reports from six of its subcontractors, which received more than $8.7 million in federal money, according to an audit set for release today.The subcontractor the audit highlighted as an issue of "greatest concern" is the $3.2 million Healthy Start Initiative, a prenatal support program for poor women that came under fire last fall amid allegations that the program's administrators misused millions of dollars.As a result of those problems, Healthy Start's executive director and chief financial officer were replaced.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and other Baltimore officials approved nearly $90,000 in city business last week with three companies that are barred from doing business in the state. The three companies were approved as subcontractors on deals to manage parking garages and locate underground utility lines. As members of the city's Board of Estimates, the officials voted to approve contracts that included two lawn-care subcontractors that had lost their state certification, in one case because of unpaid taxes.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
An advocacy group filed a complaint Friday with the federal government alleging that a Baltimore-based company put hundreds of employees at risk by failing to protect them against asbestos. Alexandra Rosenblatt and Jonathan F. Harris, staff lawyers with the Public Justice Center, said WMS Solutions LLC required its employees, who typically earn from $11 to $14 an hour, to pay for medical exams, training and protective equipment such as gloves, goggles and respirators. If workers didn't pay upfront, the costs were deducted from their paychecks, according to the complaint.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
The bowling alley business dream of Baltimore Ravens star Ray Lewis lies half-built in a far corner of the Hunt Valley Town Centre. Cinder blocks and plywood cover the entrances and windows; rubble and metal vents sit piled inside a chain-link fence. Lewis announced MVP Lanes with great fanfare more than two years ago. It was supposed to include a posh sports-themed bowling alley, restaurant, sushi bar and live radio booth - and create more than 100 service and construction jobs on the site of a former Wal-Mart.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
A Glen Burnie plowing contractor is suing the city for $5.9 million, alleging it has not been paid for snow removal services during the snowstorms of February 2010. "When there was snow up to our necks, they were glad to make a deal," said attorney Andrew D. Freeman, who is representing the Delmarva Group. "The city now regrets the deal it made" and has not paid the bill, he said. Delmarva filed suit Wednesday in city Circuit Court. The suit alleges Delmarva submitted a bid of $350 per hour per piece of equipment, which the city accepted.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and other Baltimore officials approved nearly $90,000 in city business last week with three companies that are barred from doing business in the state. The three companies were approved as subcontractors on deals to manage parking garages and locate underground utility lines. As members of the city's Board of Estimates, the officials voted to approve contracts that included two lawn-care subcontractors that had lost their state certification, in one case because of unpaid taxes.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
MVP Entertainment, a planned Hunt Valley bowling alley and restaurant led by the Baltimore Ravens' Ray Lewis, is facing lawsuits from four subcontractors who claim they have not been paid for more than $600,000 worth of work. The project, which also would feature an arcade, sushi bar and pool tables, was announced in September 2009 with great fanfare, with its backers talking about the temporary and long-term jobs it would add to the Baltimore County economy. But Marc Rosen, Lewis' partner in the venture, said in a recent interview that financing for the project fell through over the summer after a bank couldn't provide an expected loan.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
General Dynamics Corp. and its subcontractors expect to hire as many as 110 workers in Baltimore County who will work on computer systems for a new government program that will help retirees receive health care coverage, officials said Thursday. The defense contractor said Thursday that its information technology division won an $80 million award to work on the Department of Health and Human Services' Early Retiree Reinsurance Program. The program is part of the health care reform package that was passed this year and is intended to help retirees who are not yet eligible for Medicare obtain affordable insurance.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
The doors to the little shop are locked. The paint is beginning to peel and the crab grass and dandelions shove through the white gravel lot once dominated by employee cars but reduced to a storage area for a handful of boats.Sun Machine Co. once was a thriving firm on the shores of Sue Creek near Essex. But today, the two-story, sand-colored concrete block building is nothing but a symbol of how deeply slashes in the defense budget have cut.Hundreds of subcontracting companies across the state -- most of them small and unknown to most people -- have either been driven out of business, like Sun Machine, or forced to slash their operations to stay afloat in what one person described as "the hidden pain of defense downsizing."
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 25, 1999
Asian women who work in ``America's worst sweatshop'' are suing such big-name clothing makers as Tommy Hilfiger, The Gap, The Limited, J. Crew and Wal-Mart, a lawyer for about 50,000 garment makers announced last month.The class-action suits accuse 18 U.S. manufacturers of selling garments made by workers who are mistreated by foreign subcontractors in the Pacific island of Saipan, a U.S. commonwealth. The lawsuits are the first to try to use U.S. racketeering laws to hold retailers accountable for worker conditions and seek about $1 billion in damages.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,edward.gunts@baltsun.com | September 2, 2009
A second Maryland firm has sued the owner and general contractor of Baltimore's historic B&O Building in an effort to get paid for work done to complete the $65 million Hotel Monaco that opened there in late July. Attorneys for D.F. Smith Inc. of Glen Burnie, a masonry subcontractor, filed a complaint this week in Baltimore Circuit Court to establish and enforce a mechanic's lien against the property. The complaint filed by Michael P. Darrow of Hillman, Brown and Darrow PA states that Smith is seeking $29,761.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon | April 19, 2009
The City of Annapolis is to receive a nearly $5 million settlement from a construction contractor hired to renovate the police department building. Bladensburg-based J.G. Garcete Co. Inc. and its bonding company are to pay the city $3.95 million in cash, as well as a $980,000 balance which the city has already received, the city announced Monday. The city fired the construction company, which was renovating the police department, in 2007, and has since entered into litigation to recover damages from what the mayor called "shoddy" work.
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