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By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | April 22, 1992
The Carroll County Charter Review Commission last night began the complex task of reviewing the fiscal duties of a new government.Thenine-member board writing a charter for that government reviewed butdid not take action on proposed "budget and finance" provisions drafted by a subcommittee."
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
As members of the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission's policy subcommittee, we are honored to be able to serve our fellow citizens to develop a program that makes medical marijuana available to those Marylanders who have not found relief from conventional treatments and may benefit from its many medicinal uses in a safe, affordable manner ( "Proposed medical marijuana rules under fire," Aug. 27). As we have been writing the regulations to implement this new law, we are very mindful to balance the concerns of the General Assembly to assure ease of access for the patient and provide necessary security safeguards.
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NEWS
September 28, 1996
DID SPEAKER NEWT GINGRICH provide "accurate, reliable and complete information" to the House Ethics Committee probing charges that he improperly used tax-exempt funds to promote his conservative political causes? The fact that an investigating subcommittee -- divided evenly between Democrats and Republicans -- would even raise such a question and instruct its counsel to look into it further significantly elevates the "Gingrich issue" in this election.Democratic foes of Mr. Gingrich, especially Rep. John Lewis from a Georgia district adjoining the speaker's, were quick to urge that he step aside.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
A group of Anne Arundel County lawmakers have voted to move forward with efforts to change the way the county's school board is selected. Del. Steve Schuh, a Republican who chairs the education subcommittee of the county's House delegation, said that his group voted to send the county's full delegation a bill that would eventually change the current nine-member appointed school board to a body of five elected and four appointed members. The bill is an amended form of a proposal that called for increasing the school board size to 11 members and allowing voters to elect members to the two additional seats.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A congressional subcommittee might summon major league baseball players - who have been reluctant to appear in the past - to testify at its upcoming hearing on the sport's problems with performance-enhancing drugs, the panel's chairman says. "There is a possibility we would invite some ballplayers," Illinois Rep. Bobby L. Rush, chairman of an Energy and Commerce subcommittee, said in an interview. "Of course, that's a sensitive subject." In March 2005, another House committee investigating steroids used its subpoena power to compel the testimony of Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro, Sammy Sosa and several other current and former stars - most of whom had resisted appearing.
NEWS
By GREG MILLER AND MAURA REYNOLDS and GREG MILLER AND MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Republican members of the Senate Intelligence Committee defeated yesterday a Democratic push to investigate a domestic espionage operation authorized by President Bush, but they vowed to increase scrutiny of the controversial program through a newly created subcommittee. The developments enraged Democrats but delivered mixed results for the White House, which avoided a full-scale investigation of the spying operation by agreeing to provide detailed briefings on the program to a larger number of lawmakers, according to Senate Republicans.
NEWS
November 15, 1998
THE HOUSE Judiciary Committee's subcommittee on the Constitution heard the persuasive case from experts that Kenneth Starr's allegations against President Clinton, if true, fall short of an impeachable case.That was evident from the start. Mr. Starr, the independent counsel, is a distinguished appellate lawyer eminently qualified to argue constitutional issues. But as a prosecutor, he saw fit not to define an impeachable offense while accusing President Clinton of several. He was counting on scandal and outrage to win a weak case.
NEWS
By Journal of Commerce | June 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A House subcommittee will follow the Senate's lead and propose a freeze on the operations of extra-big trucks to the 20 states that currently allow them.Rep. Norman Y. Mineta, D-Calif., chairman of the Surface Transportation subcommittee of the House Public Works and Transportation Committee, said the subcommittee is building a freeze on longer-combination vehicles into its massive five-year, $153.5 billion highway and mass transit reauthorization bill.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | June 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The tape recording on which members of a House subcommittee listened to frantic telephone conversations between a deputy sheriff and members of the Branch Davidian cult near Waco, Texas, had been altered, members of the subcommittee said yesterday.But who erased critical conversations -- and when -- was not clear.The Appropriations subcommittee on treasury, postal service and general government is investigating. So is the Justice Department.The recording, on which McLennan County Sheriff's Lt. Larry Lynch appealed to David Koresh and his followers to lay down their weapons and end their Feb. 28 gunbattle with federal agents, was played during subcommittee hearings last week.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A $47 million laboratory the Environmental Protection Agency plans to build at Fort Meade was cut this week by the same House subcommittee that voted to close the && Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland's two senators said yesterday.The subcommittee cut $33 million that the Clinton administration had sought as the final installment on the cost of the lab, which has been expected to replace aging and rundown EPA labs in Annapolis and Beltsville.The lab was chopped as the subcommittee cut the EPA's budget to $4.87 billion, down $2.5 billion from the current year's outlay.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
The Baltimore County school board began the process of selecting the next superintendent Tuesday night by creating a committee to set guidelines for public participation and choosing a search firm. The board decided in a private vote more than a month ago not to extend Superintendent Joe A. Hairston's contract, and Hairston told the school board chair on Monday that he will be leaving at the end of the school year. The superintendent has been in the job for 12 years. Hairston said Tuesday night that he will hold a news conference Friday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
— In Cleveland, women's claims that a sex offender had assaulted them were ignored, until police found the bodies of 11 women at the man's home. In Milwaukee, a woman tried to report being raped but was told at three different police stations to go someplace else; her attacker went on to commit more rapes. And in New York, police apologized for downgrading a felony sexual assault in an upper Manhattan park. Women's advocates, police, and academics appeared Tuesday before a U.S. Senate panel to call on Congress to exercise greater oversight over numbers reported by local police departments to the FBI, and to update antiquated definitions that lead many rapes to be classified as lesser offenses.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
Heart surgeon Archie Roberts was speaking on cardiac disease to a group of doctors in 1997 when he felt numbness in his right arm and suddenly stumbled over his words in mid-dissertation. The man who had saved lives with his expertise in cardiology was having a stroke because he didn't follow his own advice and, as a former NFL quarterback, didn't think it could happen to him. It did. In short order, Roberts, 55 years old and 22 pounds over his playing weight of 193, was admitted to Bayshore (N.J.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and Janet Hook and James Oliphant and Janet Hook,Chicago Tribune | November 18, 2008
WASHINGTON - When Sen. Joe Lieberman broke from his longtime Democratic allegiance to back Republican John McCain for president, some rank-and-file Democrats were angry. And after Lieberman spoke at the Republican National Convention and criticized Barack Obama, they were practically apoplectic. Once Obama won and Democrats cemented their grip on Congress, the talk quickly turned to punishing the senator from Connecticut, who just eight years ago was the Democratic nominee for vice president.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A congressional subcommittee might summon major league baseball players - who have been reluctant to appear in the past - to testify at its upcoming hearing on the sport's problems with performance-enhancing drugs, the panel's chairman says. "There is a possibility we would invite some ballplayers," Illinois Rep. Bobby L. Rush, chairman of an Energy and Commerce subcommittee, said in an interview. "Of course, that's a sensitive subject." In March 2005, another House committee investigating steroids used its subpoena power to compel the testimony of Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro, Sammy Sosa and several other current and former stars - most of whom had resisted appearing.
NEWS
By James Drew and James Drew,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
State legislators toured the Rosewood Center for the developmentally disabled yesterday, but they said the visit did not give them enough information about the problems that have jeopardized federal funding at the complex. John M. Colmers, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, barred reporters from attending the tour with members of two legislative subcommittees. "I'm worried about the magnitude of people going through the facility and disrupting the residents," Colmers told legislators.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
CorrectionBecause of an error in a legislative schedule compiled by the Associated Press, The Sun incorrectly reported on Sunday this week's hearing schedule for the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Law Enforcement and Transportation.The subcommittee will receive a briefing today on recidivism rates at Patuxent Institution. On Thursday, the subcommittee will review the budgets of the state Lottery Agency, Police and Correctional Training Commissions, fire prevention commission and fire marshal's office and the inmate grievance commission.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | June 3, 1993
The top disciplinary concern of Anne Arundel County parents, teachers and students is that students who misbehave are not always held accountable for their actions and are not uniformly punished for misdeeds.That was the conclusion of a report presented yesterday to the county Board of Education by a subcommittee of the county Council of PTAs, which has been looking into discipline problems since August."It is the opinion of the committee that violent and criminal behavior in school is a serious problem and must be addressed immediately," said Carolyn Roeding, president of the PTA council and chairwoman of the subcommittee.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- House Democrats began laying the groundwork for finding former White House counsel Harriet E. Miers in contempt of Congress yesterday when, as expected, she did not appear at a congressional hearing on the firing of eight U.S. attorneys last year. In a party-line vote, a House judiciary subcommittee dismissed claims of executive privilege that Miers invoked through her lawyer in refusing to appear. The 7-5 vote was the first step in a process that could lead to Miers - who had been briefly nominated for the Supreme Court in 2005 - being found in contempt, although the timing of such a move was far from clear.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | February 4, 2007
The advice to Howard County Executive Ken Ulman from his nine transition-team subcommittees seems endless. Appoint a planning ombudsmen and hire more planners. Provide more drug treatment and do more for seniors and the homeless. Pay teachers, social workers and corrections officers well enough to attract and retain the best. Hire more police, and train firefighters faster. Fill 35 vacancies in the Department of Public Works and start fixing $1.5 billion worth of unglamorous, neglected infrastructure.
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