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By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
Dorothy Whisler's brother served in the Persian Gulf with the U.S. Army, and that was one of the reasons she volunteered in May to donate blood at the Red Cross' yearly blood drive at Western High School.The 18-year-old northeast Baltimore woman said she wanted to give part of herself for a "good cause."Her offer was not accepted.Dorothy Whisler is a native of Botswana. In line with a federal Food and Drug Administration policy instituted in 1988, manyblood banks, including those administered by the American Red Cross, don't accept blood donations from natives of, or recent visitors to, sub-Saharan Africa.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Littlefield | July 31, 2014
When President Barack Obama convenes nearly 50 African leaders in Washington next week for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the grand scale of the event could fill television screens for days. The real action, however, will be the behind-the-scenes, headlong rush by both Africans and Americans to capitalize on a new economic reality: Africa is on the move. And America's businesses and investors have just as many reasons to bring their business cards to the summit as Africans do. Casual political observers often focus on Africa's natural resources, mineral wealth and conflicts as a strategic concern, but Africa is a massive and rapidly growing consumer market that is more fully appreciated by strategic investors with each passing day. Africa's collective GDP surpassed that of Brazil and Russia six years ago, and it is estimated to be $2.6 trillion by 2020.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton embarks on the longest overseas journey of his presidency today, a 12-day, six-nation African marathon that will tout the continent's dynamic prospects and touch on its horrific experiences.The trip will be the first sustained presidential visit to sub-Saharan Africa in 20 years and the most extensive ever, highlighting the variety and texture of a region that usually appears on American television in episodes of ethnic war, famine and disease.It will be the first time a sitting president has stopped in any of Clinton's six destinations -- in order, Ghana, Uganda, Rwanda, South Africa, Botswana and Senegal.
NEWS
Kelly Virginia Phelan | May 13, 2014
In light of the recent kidnapping of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls and the worldwide call to #BringBackOurGirls, it is important to note that the difficulties facing young females in Sub-Saharan Africa extend far beyond this tragedy. Last week Jean Waller Brune, the Head of Roland Park Country School, wrote a moving piece about the challenges of girls' education around the globe ("Bring back our girls," May 8). I am a proud alumna of RPCS and remember Mrs. Brune fondly. Her words affected me profoundly, now more than ever, as I am a resident of Africa and witness these types of atrocities daily.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2004
Every day, Dorothy Murray files into a downtown clinic, raises a glass of grape juice and downs three pills under the eye of a pharmacist. It has been her routine since March, when she left the hospital after nearly dying from an AIDS-related infection that reduced her weight to 70 pounds. "I was an intravenous drug user, but I didn't like taking pills," said Murray, 38, who's back to 100 pounds, which sit well on her diminutive frame. "I figured this was the only way I'd take my medication."
TOPIC
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
On the surface Botswana appears to be a success story -- one of the few in post-colonial Africa. The nation of 1.5 million is a parliamentary democracy and its economy, fueled by diamond mining and tourism, is one of the most prosperous in Africa. Botswana gained its independence from Great Britain 34 years ago, and for much of its history, it's served as a model for good government and wise fiscal management -- a bright spot on a continent marred by instability, strife and suffering.
NEWS
By Scott Straus and Scott Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1996
NAIROBI, Kenya -- They come to Nairobi's movie theaters and public parks at lunchtime every day with God and Africa's problems on their mind. They have watched their rent, food prices and the fees they pay for health care and education rise every year while the cities around them deteriorate.These Kenyans are not turning to politicians or to mainstream churches to solve their problems. They are putting their faith in a new wave of born-again Christianity in Africa that promises heaven on earth.
BUSINESS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 2004
DAROU SALAM DIOUF, Senegal - The tiny bundle of currency - one 500-franc Central African note folded carefully around two 100-franc coins -- equals about $1.40. But Khady Mbaye clutches it in her right hand with seemingly all her might, as if she were gripping a handrail on a flight of icy steps. What would be a pocketful of loose change for millions in the world, enough to buy a cup of coffee, is for Mbaye much more. It is a solution to the riddle posed to her each morning when a shaft of sunlight falls through the window of her cinder block home: How will she survive today?
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | November 27, 2004
Four million additional health care workers are needed over the next decade worldwide to abate potential health crises around the globe and especially in sub-Saharan Africa, where potential pandemic conditions loom, according to an analysis being published today. A consortium of more than 100 physicians and other experts examined public health globally and found that a shortage of health care workers is growing. The team reported that skilled doctors and nurses from poor countries are fleeing by the thousands to better working conditions in wealthier nations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Medical experts working for the United Nations say they grossly underestimated the spread of the AIDS virus worldwide, and they now believe that new infections are occurring almost twice as rapidly as they thought a year ago. Instead of 8,200 new infections a day, they now believe there are 16,000.The new data, which began circulating yesterday among U.S. officials here and will be issued today in Paris, suggest that 30.6 million people around the world are now living with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | April 25, 2013
Malaria is an enormous and tragic problem - that can be beat. It takes the life of a child every minute in Sub-Saharan Africa, and a million people die from malaria each year. It also stifles economic development, as malaria prevents children from attending school and adults from working. Today is World Malaria Day, and I am pleased to celebrate the lives saved and enriched by recent attention and investments. Not that many years ago, this would be an occasion for hand-wringing and lamenting the many victims of this disease and wishing we could get the world to do more.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | August 10, 2009
LUANDA, Angola - -Hillary Clinton made the first visit to Angola by a U.S. secretary of state in seven years, trying Sunday to strengthen relations with a growing oil producer that is being aggressively courted by China. Clinton sought to emphasize the positive in her two-day visit, praising Angola's efforts to rebuild after a 27-year civil war that ended in 2002. But during a meeting in Parliament, opposition politicians urged her to press for more democratic behavior from President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who has been in power for three decades.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Arin Gencer and David Nitkin and Arin Gencer,Sun reporters | December 1, 2007
MOUNT AIRY -- On a visit yesterday to a Carroll County church whose members have volunteered for overseas AIDS programs, President Bush said he will travel to Africa early next year to view the progress of a multibillion-dollar U.S. effort to control the deadly virus. Bush, speaking on the eve of World AIDS Day, repeated a call for Congress to double the nation's commitment to foreign prevention and treatment programs to $30 billion over the next five years. Millions of lives could be improved, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, he said, where a $15 billion administration initiative is yielding progress.
NEWS
By Michael J. Klag | November 29, 2007
Saturday is World AIDS Day, and we Americans should be proud of what our country has achieved in the fight against AIDS. But we also should be improving our efforts. The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), a $15 billion program, has supported the care of 2.4 million people with AIDS, saving them from certain death. President Bush's initiative and the American people's generosity should be commended. Having met South Africans and Ugandans who are alive because of the program, I have seen firsthand the difference PEPFAR is making.
NEWS
By Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton and Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton,Seattle Times | September 17, 2006
Hoping to reduce hunger and poverty by sparking a "green revolution" in Africa, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced a new partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation aimed at dramatically increasing productivity of small farms in the poorest region of the world. The project faces a challenge to succeed in a region characterized by harsh and highly varied conditions, while avoiding pitfalls of earlier efforts that poisoned some ecosystems with fertilizers and pesticides and drained rivers and wetlands for irrigation.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 24, 2006
FOURWAYS, South Africa -- Like many brides-to-be, Immaculate Lesetla has found herself consumed by her coming wedding. There are 200 guests to think about, a church ceremony, a hotel reception, a honeymoon cruise on the Mediterranean Sea. Even with a professional planner, the 31-year-old computer expert is swamped. At least one thing is done: Months ago, her fiance, Aubrey Modise, paid her family $2,700 as the negotiated lobola, or bride price. It means the two are already married according to southern African custom and ready for their "Western" wedding.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | July 7, 2004
Five million people worldwide became infected with the AIDS virus last year, more than in any previous year, according to a new UNAIDS report issued in advance of next week's biannual International AIDS Conference in Bangkok, Thailand. Eastern Europe and Asia are the new hot spots, the report said: The number of HIV infections in Eastern Europe grew by 46 percent last year, to reach 1.3 million, while the number of infections in Asia rose by 17 percent to reach 7.4 million. "We're entering the true globalization phase" of the pandemic, said Dr. Peter Piot, executive director of UNAIDS, the United Nations' joint program on HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
November 29, 1999
THE LATEST United Nations report on AIDS contains some truly horrifying news. In Africa, HIV-positive women for the first time outnumber infected men. This means more and more infants will be born with the incurable virus.The implications will be devastating for South Africa and Zimbabwe, in particular. Life expectancy in southern Africa could soon drop to 45. The result will be labor shortages -- and a crippling burden on society to take care of millions of sick people.The bad news is not limited to sub-Saharan Africa, which accounts for two-thirds of the world's HIV-positive people:HIV is spreading explosively in the former Soviet Union, due to intravenous drug use and primitive health conditions.
NEWS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
As Christy Johnson prepares to close one chapter of her life, she can finally take inventory of the past. It has been a whirlwind year for Johnson, a senior at Bryn Mawr. Eight months ago, the 18-year-old won what she called the "biggest race of my life" when she defeated a talented field that included cross country runners from Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia in the elite division of the Bull Run Invitational at Hereford High School. Ten days ago, Johnson capped a track and field season during which she set two records and won two more gold medals at the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland championships.
NEWS
May 1, 2006
The Vatican has only called for a study, but its decision to review the Catholic Church's opposition to condom use by HIV-infected spouses could have a profound impact on the spread of AIDS in the developing world. The outcome depends on the church's findings, but revising the condom ban for couples afflicted with this often-fatal disease would save lives. That should be the church's focus. Reports from Rome last week said the Vatican was undertaking the study at the request of Pope Benedict XVI, who acknowledged in a speech to South African bishops last year that lives have been "shattered by this cruel epidemic."
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