Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSuave
IN THE NEWS

Suave

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | July 9, 2000
Almost 30 years ago in the movie "Shaft," detective John Shaft made an impact on the fashion world with his turtleneck sweaters, leather jackets, bell-bottoms and Afro. Tough, sexy, suave, Shaft was, as the movie tagline went, "Hotter than Bond, Cooler than Bullitt." If you think Samuel L. Jackson looks as cool in this year's Shaft as Richard Roundtree did in the 1971 version of the movie, you've got Giorgio Armani to thank. Armani, Jackson's designer of choice for the role, reportedly told Jackson: "I'll design the clothes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | August 15, 2012
Willow, a new Latin-fusion lounge and bar in Fells Point, aims to dazzle. The elegant, dimly lit upstairs is lined with plush seating, including two large leather couches in its center. Downstairs, a back lounge and front-of-the-house seating area play bookends to the striking, triangular-shaped bar. A large, vintage-looking chandelier anchors the layout. The immaculate liquor bottle display makes quite a centerpiece behind the bar. The spare backlighting draws you in, and the three rows of mid- to top-shelf liquors are presented like trophies.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 19, 1993
David Brian, handsome, suave actor perhaps best remembered for his early television series, "Mr. District Attorney," and as the leading man in several Joan Crawford films, died Thursday at his suburban Los Angeles home of cancer and heart failure. He was 82.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN and DAVID P. GREISMAN,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
The accordion set a fast tempo. The guitars and percussion joined in, while a saxophone and a violin got the groove going and the chorus dancing. The singers, following the accordionist's vocal lead, harmonized as they stepped rhythmically from side to side and tried to remain in sync with each other. Under the stage name of the Common Ground Rockin' Jalapeno Band, the nearly 20 amateur singers and musicians joined experienced professionals for the weeklong Latino Band Workshop, one of many classes offered last week during Common Ground on the Hill at McDaniel College in Westminster.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | April 15, 1995
Talkin Man was flown from Lexington, Ky., to New York yesterday to run in today's Wood Memorial, where he is the 4-5 favorite.Thunder Gulch, who arrived in Louisville, Ky., from California last Tuesday with trainer D. Wayne Lukas and his stablemates, Timber Country and Tabasco Cat, will ship by van today to Lexington, where he is the 8-5 favorite to win the Blue Grass Stakes.And, amid all this traveling, Suave Prospect galloped yesterday morning at Keeneland and waited for the final dress rehearsals for the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | October 18, 1991
No trainer has been hotter this fall than Englishman John Hammond, 31, who trains in France. Just a couple of weeks ago he almost pulled off a rare international double, saddling Suave Dancer to win the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe and finishing second by a neck with Dear Doctor in the Turf Classic at Belmont Park.He sends out royally-bred Goofalik in the Budweiser International. Although still unproven in Grade I company, the 4-year-old colt seems to fit the 10 furlongs perfectly and should finish fast with Angel Cordero Jr.Still, the quixotic Algenib is a South American champion who looks superb and is the horse to beat.
NEWS
January 23, 1999
Charles Brown, 76, the silky-smooth blues singer and pianist who will be been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in March, died in his sleep Thursday in Oakland, Calif. He had been suffering from congestive heart failure.Brown's suave, sophisticated music deeply influenced artists such as Ray Charles and Bonnie Raitt. He was best known for his songs "Driftin' Blues" and "Merry Christmas Baby."Brown's gentle, nuanced approach fell out of favor with the rock 'n' roll explosion of the mid-1950s, though he had a hit in 1961 with "Please Come Home for Christmas."
NEWS
June 29, 1996
Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli,87, the Hollywood producer whose 17 James Bond movies matched suave 007 with beautiful women, diabolical villains and gee-whiz gadgets for three decades, died Thursday at his Beverly Hills, Calif., home. He underwent heart bypass surgery a year ago. The James Bond movies, inspired by the Ian Fleming novels about the urbane British spy, are the most successful, longest-running film series ever.Mr. Broccoli successfully kept the entertaining packages of adventure, sex, posh backgrounds, gadgetry and wit coming even though the actors playing Bond changed and the supply of Fleming novels was exhausted.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW | September 21, 1991
In the peak period of broadcast network premieres, cable services are offering some interesting new programs this weekend, too. Here's a sampling:* HBO's new music series "Influences," making its debut at 10 tonight on the premium service, is undeniably intriguing -- and annoying.It stems from a great idea: to bring together, in a spontaneous performance setting, established stars whose careers provided inspiration for another generation of performers.Thus the first installment features godfather of soul James Brown and rapper M.C. Hammer, and it is something of a love fest.
NEWS
May 14, 2000
Craig Stevens, 81, who created the title role of the suave but tough private eye in "Peter Gunn," a popular television series in the late 1950s and early 1960s, died Wednesday in Los Angeles. When not chasing down evildoers and dazzling the women who crossed his path, Mr. Stevens' Peter Gunn spent his time at a jazz club where his girlfriend, Edie (Lola Albright), worked as a singer. The jazz, including the show's theme song, which became a hit on its own, was written by Henry Mancini and was the basis of two best-selling RCA recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 18, 2004
Cary Grant was born 100 years ago today in Bristol, England. The fantasy life of England, America, and all of planet Earth would never be the same. In his 34-year big-screen career, he epitomized -- and for many, defined -- the man of the world. When Frank Sinatra presented an honorary Oscar in 1970 to Grant "for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting," Sinatra said, with legend-to-legend sympathy, that he earned it "for being Cary Grant." Actually, he earned it for acting Cary Grant: the urban cavalier with a quick tongue and cunning moves.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 1, 2003
Two opposing slants on the resilient American spirit, embodied by two fortune-hunting brothers, are at the core of Bounce, the new Stephen Sondheim musical at Washington's Kennedy Center. One of the most melodic and doggedly optimistic works in the composer's canon, Bounce, which has a book by John Weidman, depicts the love-hate relationship between the real-life, turn-of-the-20th-century Mizner brothers - Addison, an architect, and Wilson, a jack of many trades, including gambling and con artistry.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | July 9, 2000
Almost 30 years ago in the movie "Shaft," detective John Shaft made an impact on the fashion world with his turtleneck sweaters, leather jackets, bell-bottoms and Afro. Tough, sexy, suave, Shaft was, as the movie tagline went, "Hotter than Bond, Cooler than Bullitt." If you think Samuel L. Jackson looks as cool in this year's Shaft as Richard Roundtree did in the 1971 version of the movie, you've got Giorgio Armani to thank. Armani, Jackson's designer of choice for the role, reportedly told Jackson: "I'll design the clothes.
NEWS
May 14, 2000
Craig Stevens, 81, who created the title role of the suave but tough private eye in "Peter Gunn," a popular television series in the late 1950s and early 1960s, died Wednesday in Los Angeles. When not chasing down evildoers and dazzling the women who crossed his path, Mr. Stevens' Peter Gunn spent his time at a jazz club where his girlfriend, Edie (Lola Albright), worked as a singer. The jazz, including the show's theme song, which became a hit on its own, was written by Henry Mancini and was the basis of two best-selling RCA recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 11, 1999
Two great artists from the same time and country always invite comparison. This is as true in music as other fields. Thus we compare (as well as pair) Bach and Handel, Mozart and Haydn, Wagner and Brahms, Prokofiev and Shostakovich, and tantalize ourselves with desert- island thoughts about which of the two we would take, if we could only have one.Such considerations were inspired this season by productions of the two greatest operas by Mussorgsky and Tchaikovsky. In less than two months, there have been productions of Mussorgsky's "Boris Godunov" (Washington Opera)
NEWS
January 23, 1999
Charles Brown, 76, the silky-smooth blues singer and pianist who will be been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in March, died in his sleep Thursday in Oakland, Calif. He had been suffering from congestive heart failure.Brown's suave, sophisticated music deeply influenced artists such as Ray Charles and Bonnie Raitt. He was best known for his songs "Driftin' Blues" and "Merry Christmas Baby."Brown's gentle, nuanced approach fell out of favor with the rock 'n' roll explosion of the mid-1950s, though he had a hit in 1961 with "Please Come Home for Christmas."
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | October 7, 1992
WHEN I see Ross Perot run again for president, I think of a suave dude who takes a date to dinner at the Waldorf-Astoria. As the candles melt over their $100 bottle of wine, he raps: "And baby, this is only the beginning. I've got $10 million, private planes and a pink Cadillac."Somewhere in the middle of the meal, he burps and says, "Be right back, got to go to the bathroom." He never comes back. The date is stuck with the bill.Three months later, Mr. Suave calls the date. "Oh baby, forget about that night.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 1, 2003
Two opposing slants on the resilient American spirit, embodied by two fortune-hunting brothers, are at the core of Bounce, the new Stephen Sondheim musical at Washington's Kennedy Center. One of the most melodic and doggedly optimistic works in the composer's canon, Bounce, which has a book by John Weidman, depicts the love-hate relationship between the real-life, turn-of-the-20th-century Mizner brothers - Addison, an architect, and Wilson, a jack of many trades, including gambling and con artistry.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Mabry and Jennifer Mabry,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 30, 1997
Shakespeare said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but if the name is Bond, it's a whole different story.Just ask James Christopher Bond. The year was 1965, the latest James Bond movie was "Thunderball," and Baltimore's Frances Bond, mother of three boys, ages 9, 7 and 2, was expecting her fourth child.Bond recalls that her two eldest sons, like other boys of the time, were caught up in the aura of British Agent 007. So much so that they asked their mother if they could name the new baby after him. Confident that she would finally have a girl, Frances Bond blithely replied: "Sure, we can name him James Bond."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 1996
Marcello Mastroianni, 72, the witty, affable and darkly handsome Italian actor who sprang on international consciousness in Federico Fellini's 1960 classic "La Dolce Vita," died Thursday at his Paris home.Mr. Mastroianni, a comic but also suave and romantic leading man in about 120 motion pictures, had suffered from pancreatic cancer.Actress Catherine Deneuve, their daughter, Chiara, and his other daughter, Barbara, were with him at his death.Mr. Mastroianni was much loved around the world for his roles opposite Italian actress Sophia Loren in 11 movies.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.