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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Hillary Rodham Clinton has a new, short hairdo that's got everyone abuzz.Everyone, that is, except for Mrs. Clinton's press aides, who don't do fashion chit-chat. Karen Finney, a White House aide, said yesterday she had seen the first lady's new haircut on television, but not in person. She offered background information to the effect that, yes, Mrs. Clinton had had her hair cut, and, no, the White House could not say who cut it."I didn't cut it and I didn't ask her; it was cut by someone in New York," said Gabriel DeBakey, Mrs. Clinton's regular Washington stylist.
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By John-John Williams IV The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
 With her Maltipoo, Brooks, tucked under her arm, Stephanie Bradshaw was ready to get down to business. Three employees were buzzing about her Clipper Mill office, preparing for a bridal photo shoot. Bradshaw rattled off questions about the session, scheduled for later that day at the Four Seasons Baltimore. Nearby lay the props: oversized dominoes and mounds of candies. Just as quickly, her attention turned to an upcoming fashion event she's styling at Towson Town Center.
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NEWS
June 30, 2004
Rosario Russell Caccamisi, a hair stylist and vintage auto enthusiast, died of a brain hemorrhage Friday at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Owings Mills resident was 65. Mr. Caccamisi was born in Cefalu, Italy, and immigrated with his family to Baltimore's Pimlico section in 1948. He was a graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and studied hair styling at what is now Avara's Academy of Hair Design and Technology. At his death, Mr. Caccamisi owned Hair by Rosario in the Pikesville Hilton and the Chartley Shopping Center in Reisterstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
The "Summer '13" show at C. Grimaldis Gallery brings together an eclectic, invigorating mix of artists and media. It's a great opportunity to get up close with, say, the late Grace Hartigan's bold and massive - 6-and-half-feet-by-11-feet - "St. George and the Dragon," a 1970 work long housed at Old Saint Paul's Church. There's something at once sobering and whimsical about this abstract painting, which, at $95,000, also happens to be the priciest piece in the exhibit. On the opposite side of the spectrum, in size and price ($1,500)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | April 8, 1993
Karen Wilson doesn't have one look. She has many.Depending on her mood, the 32-year-old hair stylist may turn up in a leopard jacket, torn T-shirt or even a pink tuxedo."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | September 2, 1993
he rockers who make their way into the MTV video cycle have acquired a style to call their own. The superstars even have star designers to dress, or undress, them as Jean-Paul Gaultier did for Miss Madonna with his leather harness. The contraption brought five figures at auction last month. Rock fashion counts.New bands trying to break into any musical venue, even in Baltimore clubs, often scoff at the notion that what they wear may count as well as what they play. But they learn. Most often, a savvy friend is the first to take them in hand and lead them into fashion attitude.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 16, 1994
The problem with getting a haircut is that I never know what to say during the act. This used to be fairly basic.The barber, whose name was Joe or Bob and never Cristophe, or, in fact, any name that required more than one syllable, would lead off with something about the weather. Like: "Hot enough for you?" That would generally be during the summer, of course.In the spring, he might change it up. You'd get maybe a "Rainy enough for you?" You get the idea. So long as there continued to be seasons, you were OK.Then, he'd ask what you'd want done to your hair.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | October 28, 1990
The hair and makeup credit for a Sun Magazine In Styl photograph on Oct. 28 was incorrect. Ashley Boyer of T. H. E. Artist Agency was the stylist.The Sun regrets the errors.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2004
Have you noticed on The Swan that after all that plastic surgery, most of the women look like drag queens? -- Clinton Kelly, stylist and host on TLC's What Not to Wear
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 27, 1991
Remember when the only thing your hairdresser knew for sure was the natural color of your hair?Now it seems your hair stylist may be more informed about your life than your spouse, your best friend, even your therapist.Eighty-four percent of the women polled by Matrix Essentials Inc. said they would trust the advice of their hairdressers over that of their therapists.Matrix, a manufacturer of skin and hair care products, says women view hairdressers much the way men view bartenders. Here is a person who will listen to your troubles, keep your secrets and maybe make you feel better in the bargain.
NEWS
Aegis report | July 28, 2013
On Saturday, Aug. 10, Patrick Lomantini, a master stylist and owner of a salon in Wichita, Kan., will cut hair at Bel Air's Persona Salon & Spa to bring attention to and raise money for the animals at the Humane Society of Harford County. On this, his third annual tour, Lomantini will travel to all 50 states in 50 days to complete at least 50 haircuts per day to show his love and passion for saving the nation's homeless animals. It's expected to take 12 hours for Lomantini to complete 50 basic haircuts with appointments beginning at 9 a.m. and the last cut at 9 p.m. Appointments can be made by calling Persona at 410-569-0101.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Hairstylist Reggie Dowdy has found himself time and time again doing emergency hair repair on women whose tresses have been damaged by weaves and extensions. They come in with bald spots, also known as alopecia, and thinning hair caused by heavy weaves pulling at their scalps. Sometimes their real hair is so unkempt underneath the weave that it becomes matted and breaks off if they try to comb it. Or they break out in rashes because of the glue some stylists use to apply weaves. Dowdy doesn't oppose weaves and extensions — the hair practice makes up 50 percent of the business at his salon, Geometrics Hair Studio in Canton.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 6, 2011
In addition to training about 5,000 men and women to become barbers and stylists over the last half century, Simon "Cy" Avara saved the careers of countless older colleagues who believed they were doomed by the Beatles. Mr. Avara opened his first hair academy in West Baltimore, where he grew up, in October 1960. In those days, male hair was short - low-maintenance, "Mad Men" hair - and American barbers, armed with clippers, kept it that way: crew cuts, buzz cuts and wiffles. Aside from minor mood swings here and there, American male hairstyles had not changed in a generation or two. But then the Beatles arrived, in 1963-64, and suddenly long hair was the rage.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
The button-down gingham shirt was accented by a maroon paisley bow tie. Her loose-fitting black jeans slightly covered her black-and-white squared leather shoes. Felicia "Snoop" Pearson's nerd-chic ensemble, accented by geeky glasses, seemed almost red-carpet-ready when she exited Baltimore Circuit Court on Monday. But "The Wire" actress' duds were more likely a calculated legal move than a fashion statement. In fact, Pearson is among a growing list of celebrities who turn to stylists or high-end designers for spiffed-up makeovers when they land in court.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | July 27, 2011
Are you a Daffodil Blonde, Sangria Red or Bronze Goddess Brunette? You can figure it out a Zen Head Salon, where stylists take a decidedly feng shui approach to hair color and style. The process of finding the best 'do for each customer at this Ellicott City salon starts with a consultation and a quick read of “Feng Shui Beauty,” by Bill Yamaguchi. Yamaguchi, owner of a salon in Carlsbad, Calif., is credited as the first stylist to relate feng shui to contemporary hairstyling.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Yes, it's real. And no, Stacy London is not getting rid of her signature gray streak of hair. She tried to do it once before, with disastrous results. London, co-host of the TLC series "What Not to Wear," is inundated with questions about the origins of her premature silver strands almost as much as inquiries from the fashionably challenged seeking couture counseling. When the former fashion editor of Vogue comes to Annapolis this weekend for the Westfield Style Tour, an event that features private consultations with professional stylists, including London, and discounted shopping, the raven-haired fashionista hopes to field questions that will lead to an end of common wardrobe missteps that many women make.
FEATURES
By Donald Munro and Donald Munro,McClatchy News Service | June 18, 1992
Fresno, Calif--My buddy hadn't seen me in three or four months. His San Francisco Bay Area hipness oozes from him like cologne, and when I opened my door, he looked at me with a critical eye."Cool," he said approvingly. "You look just like Luke Perry."I've never been surfing, I don't drink and drive, and as far as I know, my last shopping mall appearance didn't include hordes of screaming women."Excuse me?""The sideburns," he replied. "They're cool. You look like you're in the cast of '90210.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | August 12, 2001
Sisqo's singing career may be waning (his latest thongs -- whoops, I mean songs -- are taking a beating on the charts), but his days as a designer are just getting started. This month, the Baltimore boy wonder launched Dragon Collection, a line of men's clothing based on his personal style, which could be described as urban peacock. "I decided to develop my own clothing line after spending a great deal of time and expense having my wardrobe custom-made," Sisqo says in a prepared statement, "and then noticing that people were taking notice and following my lead."
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2010
His hands have worked magic on some of the most famous manes in the world: Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Jennifer Lopez, Linda Evangelista. But Oribe Canales wants you to know that he's just an average Joe. He's frequented the same neighborhood barber in Miami for the past 18 years. You can call his sister — who works the front desk of his Miami salon — to make an appointment. Oribe — he's referred to by his first name — was at The Sheraton in Towson earlier this week to help celebrate the 40th anniversary of About Faces, the salon chain that has used and sold his products since his line launched, to give a hair demonstration and help style models for a hair and fashion show extravaganza.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
Lilac, magenta, eggplant, aubergine, mulberry, blackberry, and purpley-pink. This fall, purple reigns supreme among the fashion elite. Yves Saint Laurent, Donna Karan, Phillip Lim, Alexander McQueen, Badley Mischa, and Robert Graham all released designs of the purple hue for their fall lines. The trend will continue into the later months as designers this week at the Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week also showcased purple pieces. In Baltimore, a city that bleeds purple because of its connection to its NFL football team, it seems like a perfect excuse to play dress up at games.
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