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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
VENICE, CALIF. - A small, dark Chevy swings into a parking space a block or so off Muscle Beach, and Michael B. Styer unfolds himself from the front passenger seat and into the Pacific breeze.He pulls on his blue blazer, straightens his patterned tie and from the trunk gathers up two photo albums depicting scenes from Baltimore and Maryland. Then, edging past a couple of tawny in-line skaters, he makes his way across a narrow street to a squat, two-story townhouse. Waiting inside is the possibility of 10 or 11 weeks of film production in Maryland and millions of dollars.
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NEWS
July 8, 2007
In partnership with Cecil College, the Maryland Humanities Council will present "Chautauqua 2007: Food for Thought" at 7 p.m. Friday through July 16 on the North East campus. The free program features scholars assuming the costumes and characters of historical figures, talking about their lives and answering audience questions. In event of inclement weather, performances will be held in the Milburn Stone Theatre. The event will features impersonations of farm worker, labor leader and civil rights activist Cesar Chavez, presented by Fred Blanco on Friday; agricultural scientist, educator, artist, musician and humanitarian George Washington Carver, presented by Paxton Williams on Saturday; novelist, essayist, short story writer and social activist Upton Sinclair, presented by Doug Mishler on July 15; and chef Julia Child, presented by Mary Ann Jung on July 16. Lead-in programs precede the Chautauquans.
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NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1997
Early yesterday, about 130 Baltimore-area business executives gathered in a hotel conference room to discuss "Homicide: Life on the Street," the new Tim Allen movie, "For Richer or Poorer," and Oprah Winfrey's latest film endeavor, "Beloved."They weren't actually fans; at the breakfast meeting organized by the BWI Business Partnership at Linthicum's Doubletree Guest Suites Hotel, story lines and stars were of secondary interest.The main issue was money: how to bring more film crews -- and the dollars they spend -- into Maryland.
FEATURES
By MIKE OLLOVE | May 20, 1999
During Saturday's Preakness Stakes, Michael Styer, head of the Maryland Film Office, was at another race track on the other side of the country, playing host to 200 television and movie executives.To say the least, the timing of this long-planned "Preakness in Hollywood" party was awkward. The event was intended to help lure film production to Maryland, but it came just two days after filmmaking here received its worst ever setback. On Thursday, NBC canceled "Homicide: Life on the Street," the critically acclaimed television series that had greatly enhanced Baltimore's credentials with Hollywood studios and established its credibility in television production.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 24, 1992
Challenged by state budget cuts and competition from cable programming, public television, which has never successfully marketed itself to younger viewers, is fighting back.In an effort to attract a "new, younger audience," Maryland Public Television will begin airing reruns of "St. Elsewhere" on June 1, station officials announced yesterday.Not only is it rare for a public TV station to air reruns of commercial network shows, but the time slot -- 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday -- will pit "St. Elsewhere" against local late news shows and PBS' "MacNeil/Lehrer News Hour," on Washington's WHMM-TV (Channel 32)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 24, 1992
Challenged by state budget cuts and competition from cable programming, public television, which has never successfully marketed itself to younger viewers, is fighting back.In an effort to attract a "new, younger audience," Maryland Public Television will begin airing reruns of "St. Elsewhere" on June 1, station officials announced yesterday.Not only is it rare for a public TV station to air reruns of commercial network shows, but the time slot -- 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday -- will pit "St. Elsewhere" against local late news shows and PBS' "MacNeil/Lehrer News Hour," on Washington's WHMM-TV (Channel 32)
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 1996
TWO LOCAL girls really took the spotlight last month at the National Junior Wheelchair Championships in Birmingham, Ala.Wheelchair athletes competing in track and field, swimming, archery, slalom and weightlifting were challenged to go for the gold.Becky and Danielle Styer, the 12-year-old twin daughters of Brenda and Richard Styer of Berrywood, were part of a 15-member team from the Bennett Institute, a rehabilitation facility run by Children's Hospital of Baltimore.The twins were born with cerebral palsy.
FEATURES
By MIKE OLLOVE | May 20, 1999
During Saturday's Preakness Stakes, Michael Styer, head of the Maryland Film Office, was at another race track on the other side of the country, playing host to 200 television and movie executives.To say the least, the timing of this long-planned "Preakness in Hollywood" party was awkward. The event was intended to help lure film production to Maryland, but it came just two days after filmmaking here received its worst ever setback. On Thursday, NBC canceled "Homicide: Life on the Street," the critically acclaimed television series that had greatly enhanced Baltimore's credentials with Hollywood studios and established its credibility in television production.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1995
An article about movie stars in Baltimore that appeared in yesterday's editions incorrectly identified the network on which the series "Homicide" can be seen. The series airs on NBC.The Sun regrets the errors.Anne Bancroft was seen last week working out with weights at the Harbor Court Hotel.Holly Hunter and Robert Downey Jr. were spied entering Scarlett Place on Pratt Street. They presumably headed for the sixth-floor office of Jodie Foster, director of their romantic comedy, "Home for the Holidays," which is shooting here this month (and also stars Ms. Bancroft)
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch | December 10, 1995
Guardian artist; Michael Swanson: His daily work is at the 0) Walters, but at night he creates works of his own.By day, Michael Swanson stands in his guard's uniform and watches over the paintings, vases and sculptures on display at the Walters Art Gallery. By night he settles down before his drawing pad, propelled by the thrill of creating and dreams of greatness."Pete Rose, he liked to play baseball. That's how I feel about drawing," says Mr. Swanson, 32, who just finished a one-man show, his first, in a downtown restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 2, 1999
The hometown went Hollywood for the opening of the Maryland Film Festival. About 600 cinephiles swarmed to the historic Senator Theatre to see local-boy-done-really-good Barry Levinson present his documentary in progress, "Diner Guys."The audience included local filmmakers John Waters, Steve Yeager, Dan Rosen, Paul Zinder and Elizabeth Holder; film festival founder Jed Dietz; festival consultant Gabriel Wardell; Dr. Sylvan Feldman and Dr. Larry Becker, two of the "Diner Guys"; casting director Pat Moran; CBS-TV reporter Vicki Mabrey; Dr. Lovell Smith, an assistant professor at Loyola College; performance artist David Sawyer; Mike Styer, Maryland Film Office director.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 16, 1998
In Michael Moore's 1994 satire, "Canadian Bacon," our neighbor to the north was depicted as an evil empire, out to invade America with Zamboni machines and strange word pronunciations.The film was a comedy, but ask some folks in the film industry, and they'll say it wasn't too far from the truth. Through a confluence of favorable exchange rates and some ultra-generous tax breaks, Canada is increasingly drawing film and television production away from the United States - along with the economic impact it generates.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1997
Early yesterday, about 130 Baltimore-area business executives gathered in a hotel conference room to discuss "Homicide: Life on the Street," the new Tim Allen movie, "For Richer or Poorer," and Oprah Winfrey's latest film endeavor, "Beloved."They weren't actually fans; at the breakfast meeting organized by the BWI Business Partnership at Linthicum's Doubletree Guest Suites Hotel, story lines and stars were of secondary interest.The main issue was money: how to bring more film crews -- and the dollars they spend -- into Maryland.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 1996
TWO LOCAL girls really took the spotlight last month at the National Junior Wheelchair Championships in Birmingham, Ala.Wheelchair athletes competing in track and field, swimming, archery, slalom and weightlifting were challenged to go for the gold.Becky and Danielle Styer, the 12-year-old twin daughters of Brenda and Richard Styer of Berrywood, were part of a 15-member team from the Bennett Institute, a rehabilitation facility run by Children's Hospital of Baltimore.The twins were born with cerebral palsy.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
VENICE, CALIF. - A small, dark Chevy swings into a parking space a block or so off Muscle Beach, and Michael B. Styer unfolds himself from the front passenger seat and into the Pacific breeze.He pulls on his blue blazer, straightens his patterned tie and from the trunk gathers up two photo albums depicting scenes from Baltimore and Maryland. Then, edging past a couple of tawny in-line skaters, he makes his way across a narrow street to a squat, two-story townhouse. Waiting inside is the possibility of 10 or 11 weeks of film production in Maryland and millions of dollars.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch | December 10, 1995
Guardian artist; Michael Swanson: His daily work is at the 0) Walters, but at night he creates works of his own.By day, Michael Swanson stands in his guard's uniform and watches over the paintings, vases and sculptures on display at the Walters Art Gallery. By night he settles down before his drawing pad, propelled by the thrill of creating and dreams of greatness."Pete Rose, he liked to play baseball. That's how I feel about drawing," says Mr. Swanson, 32, who just finished a one-man show, his first, in a downtown restaurant.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | May 13, 1994
Things are beginning to roll again at the Maryland Film Commission. That's the word from commission director Michael Styer, the keynote speaker at the Maryland/DC Production Guide's new business symposium. Dozens of actors, agents, directors, cameramen and others who work in and around the film/video industry in Maryland gathered at the lovely old Senator Theatre Wednesday morning to network and catch up on the latest news.After a dry spell, Styer says contacts and hard work are beginning to pay off again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 2, 1999
The hometown went Hollywood for the opening of the Maryland Film Festival. About 600 cinephiles swarmed to the historic Senator Theatre to see local-boy-done-really-good Barry Levinson present his documentary in progress, "Diner Guys."The audience included local filmmakers John Waters, Steve Yeager, Dan Rosen, Paul Zinder and Elizabeth Holder; film festival founder Jed Dietz; festival consultant Gabriel Wardell; Dr. Sylvan Feldman and Dr. Larry Becker, two of the "Diner Guys"; casting director Pat Moran; CBS-TV reporter Vicki Mabrey; Dr. Lovell Smith, an assistant professor at Loyola College; performance artist David Sawyer; Mike Styer, Maryland Film Office director.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 13, 1995
An article about movie stars in Baltimore that appeared in yesterday's editions incorrectly identified the network on which the series "Homicide" can be seen. The series airs on NBC.The Sun regrets the errors.Anne Bancroft was seen last week working out with weights at the Harbor Court Hotel.Holly Hunter and Robert Downey Jr. were spied entering Scarlett Place on Pratt Street. They presumably headed for the sixth-floor office of Jodie Foster, director of their romantic comedy, "Home for the Holidays," which is shooting here this month (and also stars Ms. Bancroft)
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | May 13, 1994
Things are beginning to roll again at the Maryland Film Commission. That's the word from commission director Michael Styer, the keynote speaker at the Maryland/DC Production Guide's new business symposium. Dozens of actors, agents, directors, cameramen and others who work in and around the film/video industry in Maryland gathered at the lovely old Senator Theatre Wednesday morning to network and catch up on the latest news.After a dry spell, Styer says contacts and hard work are beginning to pay off again.
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