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NEWS
November 12, 1992
Why is Baltimore County always made a monkey when it comes to the long-burning "stump dump" in Granite? Since jTC Ronald Reagan's first term, western county residents have complained about the mountain of stumps that James F. Jett collected on his property for profit; the mound once reached 100 feet high and covered five acres.But county officials fiddled and then the stump dump burned.A year ago, county Circuit Court Judge James T. Smith Jr. rebuked county officials, saying that they, not Mr. Jett, must clean up the mess.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
A contractor for Baltimore's department of recreation and parks is working to smother a smoldering compost pile at a facility just south of Cold Spring Lane, according to a spokeswoman. The contractor was adding more dirt to reduce the flow of oxygen to the pile at Camp Small, she said. The facility is west of Interstate 83 and the smoke was visible to morning commuters. Compost piles heat as the organic materials decay, said the spokeswoman, Gwendolyn Chambers. Occasionally, the pile may grow warm enough to smolder if there's enough oxygen, she said.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 4, 1991
At long last, we come to Act III of the fifth opera in the Don Donaldo Ring Cycle, inspired by the legends of the Lord High Governor of Maryland. In Acts I and II, Don Donaldo worked futilely to save his empire. Yet, goaded into rages by angry mail from peasants, spurned by a Parliament he alienated, Don Donaldo became increasingly morose and isolated from his once-adoring public. He has become painfully aware that, without drastic action, his empire will totter further.Don Donaldo, On The Edge Place: A smoldering stump dump Time: The presentAs the curtain rises, we see the darkest setting in all the Don Donaldo operas.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2010
Rosalyn N. "Roz" Roddy, an indefatigable neighborhood activist who was a founder and past president of the Greater Patapsco Community Association, died May 27 of lung cancer in her Owings Mills home. She was 77. "Roz was one of those remarkable people that had so many dimensions that were not directly related or overlapping," said Kathleen Skullney, a Legal Aid attorney and a Granite activist. "She was an ever-inquiring and graceful human being." Rosalyn Rayboen, the daughter of a Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | July 31, 1991
The operator of a stump dump that has been smoldering for nearly six months was in Circuit Court in Towson again yesterday, and residents who live in the area continued to protest outside the courthouse.James F. Jett is attempting to prove that he is in compliance with a May 30 court ruling by Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr.But attorneys for Baltimore County, who are seeking a contempt charge against Mr. Jett, argued that he is in violation of the court ruling.Mr. Jett's stump dump and tree farm, in the 8700 block of Dogwood Road in western Baltimore County, has been burning since Feb. 2.County Attorney H. Emslie Parks filed a motion alleging that Mr. Jett be found in contempt of court because he failed to meet the fire safety conditions specified in the May 30 order.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1996
Spurred by complaints from the operator of a stump dump near Granite in Baltimore County, state environmental officials sought yesterday to clarify reports that the dump had been closed.The Maryland Department of the Environment issued an order last week revoking the natural wood waste permit of Patapsco Valley Farms Natural Wood Waste Recycling of Baltimore and ordered owner James F. Jett to pay $50,000 in penalties for environmental violations.R. Wayne Beatty, who has been operating and cleaning up the dump since June, complained that news releases and comments by a state spokesman implied that the dump had been shut down.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | December 24, 1993
With millions of dollars in court judgments against him, Granite stump dump owner James F. Jett has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for himself and his Patapsco Valley Farms business on Dogwood Road.An angry Mr. Jett yesterday termed the filing a "reorganization" forced on him by lost income stemming from the huge fire that erupted at his stump dump on Feb. 2, 1991."The county's the reason this happened," he said. "They didn't put the . . . fire out!"He reiterated his contention that a local Granite youth set the fire, which wasn't fully controlled until December 1992.
NEWS
November 4, 1992
Item: Baltimore County has filed a $9 million lawsuit against the owner of a "stump dump," which had raised the ire of neighbors for years and has been burning during the past 19 months.Item: The U.S. government is looking into whether the state and county adequately responded to citizen complaints about possible ground water contamination from a closed public landfill in northern Baltimore County.Conclusion: Government at times ignores its "of the people, by the people, for the people" mission.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | February 3, 1991
Baltimore County firefighters may need two or three days to extinguish a smoldering fire in a 75-foot high "stump dump" that for years has been the object of community loathing in Granite, a wooded, western portion of the county near Patapsco State Park."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | September 16, 1994
Just the words "fire" and "stump dump" used in the same sentence are enough to make most Baltimore County officials extremely nervous.That's why a small fire yesterday in a large pile of mulch at Patapsco Valley Farms on Dogwood Road in Granite attracted top county government officials along with two fire engines and eight tanker trucks to the site of the 1991-1992 stump dump fire.The fire, reported at 6:45 a.m. yesterday at the top of a mulch pile 18 feet high and 50 feet long, was "real minor," said Fire Specialist Ronald Schneider, a county Fire Department spokesman.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Frustrated by almost 15 years of technicalities and delays, opponents of a stump dump in Clarksville moved one step closer yesterday to achieving their goal of shutting down the controversial facility.The Howard County Planning Board voted unanimously not to reassess a revised plan that would legalize the stump dump operated by farmer Alfred E. Bassler. The board's decision means the case moves to the Board of Appeals, where opponents hope to prevail.The five-member Planning Board had turned down Bassler's plan to legalize the stump dump and was urged by Bassler's attorney, Thomas E. Lloyd, to reconsider.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
In what could prolong what is one of the longest-running zoning controversies in Howard County, a farmer running an unauthorized stump dump in Clarksville has submitted several additional changes in his quest to legalize his operation.It's unclear whether the Planning Board -- which recommended denial of the project 11 months ago -- will have to review Alfred E. Bassler's proposal again, but the board will answer that question during a meeting Thursday.Joseph W. Rutter Jr., director of the Department of Planning and Zoning, doesn't want more delays, and said the board will not miss anything if it declines to review the stump-dump project again.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1999
An attorney for a farmer running an illegal stump dump in Clarksville has withdrawn the case from the Howard County Board of Appeals.The board was scheduled to open a public hearing Thursday night on Alfred E. Bassler's request for a special exception to legally use 68.7 acres of his 430-acre farm to run a yard-waste composting facility, sawmill and mulch manufacturing operation.The area's zoning prohibits a stump dump.Attorney Thomas E. Lloyd of Ellicott City said he withdrew from the hearing because of recent publicity surrounding the abrupt resignation of board member Donald Messenger and a full docket of cases.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1998
Planning Board members added another chapter to one to the county's longest-running zoning controversies yesterday by unanimously rejecting a plan to put a zoning seal of approval on a notorious Clarksville "stump dump." Clarksville resident Alfred Bassler is seeking a special exception for 68.73 acres of his 430-acre site so that he can continue running a yard-waste composting facility, sawmill and mulch manufacturing operation.Though Bassler's plan had the blessing of county zoning authorities, the board found that the facility creates too much noise and air pollution for its neighbors.
NEWS
By From staff reports | September 11, 1997
TOWSON -- A Catonsville man who served 18 months of a five-year sentence for child abuse in a 1992 incident that left his infant son on life-support and resulted in the boy's death this year cannot be prosecuted in the death, authorities said yesterday.Although Joshua M. Sullivan's death June 28 has been ruled a homicide by the state medical examiner's office, a "year and a day" law in effect at the time of the incident prevents prosecution on murder charges after so long a time, county police said.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1997
After years of battling state and Howard County officials, the owner of a Clarksville stump dump is a step closer toward legitimizing his operations.By a unanimous vote last night, the council approved the 30-acre dump owned by Alfred S. Bassler as part of Howard's solid-waste master plan.The facility turns stumps and yard waste into compost.With the vote, the county Board of Appeals and the state Department of the Environment can move ahead with reviews of the stump dump.Bassler needs an operating permit from state environmental officials and a special exception to county zoning regulations from the Board of Appeals.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | February 12, 1993
Three days after warning James J. Jett to stop operating his stump-mulching operation at the Granite stump dump because he doesn't have a permit, the state Department of the Environment filed suit yesterday, seeking a permanent injunction.The state asks that Judge James T. Smith Jr. order Mr. Jett to stop processing tree stumps, logs and other wood debris without a state natural-wood recycling permit. It also seeks to impose fines of up to $10,000 a day if Mr. Jett does not comply, said John Goheen, an MDE spokesman.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1991
The owner of a smoldering stump dump in Baltimore County got some bad news yesterday from Howard County, which revoked the zoning exception for his garden center near Ellicott City.The county's Board of Appeal in the first action of its kind revoked the special exception held by James F. Jett, who operates Patapsco Family Gardens in a residential zone on Route 99 near McKenzie Road.The board found that Mr. Jett had violated conditions it set in 1986 and clarified last year.The violations involved screening requirements, hours of operation, failure to erect a split-rail fence along the eastern lot line, storing equipment outdoors and selling fertilizer and hand tools prohibited for retail sale by the board, the board said.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
The Howard County Council is poised to approve a controversial Clarksville stump dump as part of its solid-waste master plan -- the first step to making the facility comply with state and county regulations.Several council members have visited the Sheppard Lane facility, owned by Alfred S. Bassler. The council also met with a state environmental official at its work session Tuesday night."I'm getting the sense there's enough votes to pass it," said Council Chairman Dennis R. Schrader after the meeting.
NEWS
March 26, 1997
HOWARD COUNTY AND state regulators ought to be glad that Alfred S. Bassler has finally come around. A man who once seemed to enjoy flouting rules while operating his Clarksville stump dump says he wants to "get legal." He has taken the first step toward compliance by at least acknowledging that government has jurisdiction over the way his facility operates.Mr. Bassler is asking the County Council to designate his stump dump, or waste-wood facility, a component of Howard's solid waste management plan.
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