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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
School's out at South Carroll High. The halls are empty. The athletic teams are on the practice fields -- with one exception. The members of the girls' varsity soccer team sit quietly in a classroom.Their coach, Jim Horn, is an easygoing and popular social studies teacher at the school, but he's unyielding on one matter when it comes to the young athletes on his team. Before hitting the practice fields, they've got to hit the books.Horn started his mandatory half-hour study hall for players last year.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
After spending the previous five seasons as the school's junior varsity coach and varsity assistant under former coach Albert Holley, Silverman is excited about the prospects of maintaining the program's lofty standard on and off the basketball court in his first season in charge of the varsity squad. The No. 5 Millers, who have won four straight Baltimore County championships and two state titles in that span, are off to a 4-1 start and coming off an impressive 62-46 win over New Town on Wednesday.  Silverman has maintained many of the same successful philosophies Holley incorporated into the program with some new twists thrown in. In addition to coaching, he's also the school's Physical Education and Health department chairperson.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | October 12, 1992
In most schools, the last period of the day is poison. Teachers and students alike are itching for the dismissal bell to ring.That is one problem solved by the elective classes offered at New Windsor Middle School.The last 40 minutes each day offer students such courses as hunting and fishing safety, model building, crocheting, video aerobics, first aid for baby sitters, photography and classic films.A student can take a different course each day or take just one a week and have a study hall the remaining days.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | May 11, 2008
Rick and Terri Steel were about to sign the contract for a new house when they decided to go for a drive and give it some thought. They said it was a good thing they did. In the car, winding along some country roads just beyond the busy Owings Mills commercial centers, they happened upon a stately, old manor house with a giant maple tree in front. They knew by looking at the porch that it was really the home in which they, their three kids and two dogs belonged. Terri Steel said she still has a picture of her husband, Rick, standing beneath the two-story porch roof of the 1840s-era house that they bought seven years ago. But now that two of their three kids have grown and left and the bustle in the "study hall" -- a wide hallway equipped with desks and computers -- has largely quieted, they have decided to move on. "This is going to be a hard place to leave because it was such a lovely place to raise a family," said Terri Steel.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1997
ASHEVILLE, N.C. -- Meeting the Atlantic Coast Conference vTC media for the first time yesterday, new Maryland football Ron Vanderlinden reviewed his role in the improbable rebuilding jobs at Colorado and Northwestern and candidly discussed a rare failure.The occasion was the ACC Football Kickoff, new territory for a coach more familiar with the Big 12 and Big Ten. Vanderlinden did work against one ACC team last year, but that experience was a disaster, as Northwestern lost to lowly Wake Forest.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown | April 17, 1991
Maryland football notes: COLLEGE PARK -- Gene Thomas' baseball career at Maryland is on hold. Indeed, he has yet to put on spikes. Maybe he'll play next spring, after his final season of football.Thomas came to Maryland last year from Montgomery/Rockville Junior College wearing two hats, as a wide receiver and centerfielder. He planned to play baseball with football coach Joe Krivak's blessing.But Thomas decided to forsake baseball this spring to beef up his grade-point average and work out with the football team in his spare moments.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Rabbi Sheftel Neuberger cracks the door to the study hall at Ner Israel Rabbinical College and beams as a torrent of conversation that sounds like a Middle Eastern marketplace pours out. Inside, hundreds of students dressed in white shirts, black trousers and yarmulkes are boisterously debating Talmudic texts in English peppered with Hebrew and Aramaic. Facing off across tables piled high with books, "the boys," as Neuberger calls his students, analyze and cajole, scribble notes and wag their fingers, each trying to convince the other of the merits of his argument.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | October 3, 2006
With his teaching and coaching schedule, it's a pretty fair bet that River Hill boys soccer coach Matt Shagogue doesn't have the time to watch Dr. Phil or Oprah in the afternoons. But, in one month on the job at the Clarksville school, it has become clear that Shagogue has been listening to someone's sermons about the benefit of establishing solid bonds with those you work with. "What has kind of opened their eyes is if I expect something of them, I try to do it with them," Shagogue said.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
After spending the previous five seasons as the school's junior varsity coach and varsity assistant under former coach Albert Holley, Silverman is excited about the prospects of maintaining the program's lofty standard on and off the basketball court in his first season in charge of the varsity squad. The No. 5 Millers, who have won four straight Baltimore County championships and two state titles in that span, are off to a 4-1 start and coming off an impressive 62-46 win over New Town on Wednesday.  Silverman has maintained many of the same successful philosophies Holley incorporated into the program with some new twists thrown in. In addition to coaching, he's also the school's Physical Education and Health department chairperson.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | May 11, 2008
Rick and Terri Steel were about to sign the contract for a new house when they decided to go for a drive and give it some thought. They said it was a good thing they did. In the car, winding along some country roads just beyond the busy Owings Mills commercial centers, they happened upon a stately, old manor house with a giant maple tree in front. They knew by looking at the porch that it was really the home in which they, their three kids and two dogs belonged. Terri Steel said she still has a picture of her husband, Rick, standing beneath the two-story porch roof of the 1840s-era house that they bought seven years ago. But now that two of their three kids have grown and left and the bustle in the "study hall" -- a wide hallway equipped with desks and computers -- has largely quieted, they have decided to move on. "This is going to be a hard place to leave because it was such a lovely place to raise a family," said Terri Steel.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Lem Satterfield and Kevin Van Valkenburg and Lem Satterfield,SUN REPORTERS | January 31, 2007
It's a lost cause. In the crumbling cafeteria at Edmondson-Westside High School on a Thursday afternoon in mid-September, the Red Storm football team endures the final moments of mandatory study hall. But, at the moment, physics, American history and pre-calculus could not be further from their thoughts. All they can think about is Saturday. Edmondson vs. City College. The biggest game of the year, the obsession that crowds everything else out. And it shows on this September day. Sterling Jones chews on his fingernails.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | October 3, 2006
With his teaching and coaching schedule, it's a pretty fair bet that River Hill boys soccer coach Matt Shagogue doesn't have the time to watch Dr. Phil or Oprah in the afternoons. But, in one month on the job at the Clarksville school, it has become clear that Shagogue has been listening to someone's sermons about the benefit of establishing solid bonds with those you work with. "What has kind of opened their eyes is if I expect something of them, I try to do it with them," Shagogue said.
NEWS
By MOLLY KNIGHT and MOLLY KNIGHT,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
Much about the Naval Academy has remained the same since its founding in 1845 by Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft. The school still occupies a picturesque place on the banks of the Severn River in Annapolis. The midshipmen still wear crisp white uniforms and are required to serve at least five years in the Navy or Marine Corps after they graduate. "The mission of the Naval Academy is to develop midshipmen morally, mentally and physically to become future combat leaders of character," said Cmdr.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Rabbi Sheftel Neuberger cracks the door to the study hall at Ner Israel Rabbinical College and beams as a torrent of conversation that sounds like a Middle Eastern marketplace pours out. Inside, hundreds of students dressed in white shirts, black trousers and yarmulkes are boisterously debating Talmudic texts in English peppered with Hebrew and Aramaic. Facing off across tables piled high with books, "the boys," as Neuberger calls his students, analyze and cajole, scribble notes and wag their fingers, each trying to convince the other of the merits of his argument.
SPORTS
By Alex Koustenis and Alex Koustenis,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2002
The Patterson High School football players never thought they would be sitting in Wendy's at 9 on a Saturday morning, especially to study. But with the school closed on weekends, academic counselor Kelley Bagdasarian had to find a place to hold her study hall. "It was a pain," junior Eubanks Johnson said. "We just wanted to chill out on the weekend, but Miss Kelley made that her time. But study hall has helped me a lot." Since the National Football Foundation chose Patterson for the Play It Smart program two years ago, poor grades and test scores are becoming a thing of the past for athletes.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
School's out at South Carroll High. The halls are empty. The athletic teams are on the practice fields -- with one exception. The members of the girls' varsity soccer team sit quietly in a classroom.Their coach, Jim Horn, is an easygoing and popular social studies teacher at the school, but he's unyielding on one matter when it comes to the young athletes on his team. Before hitting the practice fields, they've got to hit the books.Horn started his mandatory half-hour study hall for players last year.
SPORTS
By Alex Koustenis and Alex Koustenis,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2002
The Patterson High School football players never thought they would be sitting in Wendy's at 9 on a Saturday morning, especially to study. But with the school closed on weekends, academic counselor Kelley Bagdasarian had to find a place to hold her study hall. "It was a pain," junior Eubanks Johnson said. "We just wanted to chill out on the weekend, but Miss Kelley made that her time. But study hall has helped me a lot." Since the National Football Foundation chose Patterson for the Play It Smart program two years ago, poor grades and test scores are becoming a thing of the past for athletes.
NEWS
By MOLLY KNIGHT and MOLLY KNIGHT,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
Much about the Naval Academy has remained the same since its founding in 1845 by Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft. The school still occupies a picturesque place on the banks of the Severn River in Annapolis. The midshipmen still wear crisp white uniforms and are required to serve at least five years in the Navy or Marine Corps after they graduate. "The mission of the Naval Academy is to develop midshipmen morally, mentally and physically to become future combat leaders of character," said Cmdr.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1997
ASHEVILLE, N.C. -- Meeting the Atlantic Coast Conference vTC media for the first time yesterday, new Maryland football Ron Vanderlinden reviewed his role in the improbable rebuilding jobs at Colorado and Northwestern and candidly discussed a rare failure.The occasion was the ACC Football Kickoff, new territory for a coach more familiar with the Big 12 and Big Ten. Vanderlinden did work against one ACC team last year, but that experience was a disaster, as Northwestern lost to lowly Wake Forest.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | October 12, 1992
In most schools, the last period of the day is poison. Teachers and students alike are itching for the dismissal bell to ring.That is one problem solved by the elective classes offered at New Windsor Middle School.The last 40 minutes each day offer students such courses as hunting and fishing safety, model building, crocheting, video aerobics, first aid for baby sitters, photography and classic films.A student can take a different course each day or take just one a week and have a study hall the remaining days.
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