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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 19, 2012
A person is more likely to get struck by lightening than shot while at a hospital, according to new research by Johns Hopkins. Investigators at Hopkins reviewed 11 years of data and found that 30 percent of hospital shootings occurred in emergency rooms. Nearly 50 percent of those shootings involved a security officer's gun - either stolen or used by a security. The study looked at 154 shootings at hospitals, resulting in 253 deaths or injuries. The shootings were difficult to prevent because they involved a "determined shooter," said Dr. Gabe Kelen, M.D., the lead author of the report, and the director of the Johns Hopkins Department of Emergency Medicine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Ahead of new rules requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts for their menu items, some of the restaurants are voluntarily introducing lower calorie selections. The new items tend to be salads rather than the main attractions such as burgers and pizza, but they contain an average of 60 fewer calories or a reduction of 12 percent, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found. The researchers looked at new menu items in 2012 and 2013, ahead of new rules to offer the public nutritional information required by the Affordable Care Act. And they said the results, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, could be the beginning of a trend in calorie reduction at fast food restaurants that aids the obesity epidemic.
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NEWS
June 15, 2014
Whether the air quality in a hookah lounge is outstandingly fresh or alarmingly toxic, the real benefit to those who use these facilities is they can continue their lifestyle without endangering us ( "Study discovers poor air quality in hookah lounges," June 12). We have to suffer toxic smoke fumes every time we go outdoors in Baltimore. What good would a study do anyway? We know unquestionably that tobacco smoke along with secondhand smoke makes the user and the bystander eventually suffer a premature, agonizing and slow death.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
GAME PLAN: The Ravens regressed offensively despite a concerted effort to spread the football around in the passing game. Trailing on the scoreboard and dealing with frequent pass-protection breakdowns, their reaction was to throw more instead of trying to pound the football on the ground. With Joe Flacco under duress, Gary Kubiak was unable to execute his strategy. A litany of failures on third down - they went 1-for-11 for a 9-percent conversion rate - prevented drives from getting untracked.
NEWS
August 5, 2011
Thomas A. Firey's recent suggestion in The Sun ("Better pension reform," July 27) of a statewide "buy-back" program for public employees to reduce Maryland's future public pension should be vetted very closely by citizens and officials, given the incomplete science that serves as its foundation. The underlying premise for his suggestion is the latest draft of an unpublished academic study that attempts to quantify the attitudes of Illinois public school teachers using 13-year-old data.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Let me get this straight. Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake hires an out-of-state firm and pays them $460,000 to tell her that the city is facing a $750 million shortfall ("Report says city is facing nearly $750 deficit," Feb. 7)? And pensions are the biggest problem? Start by eliminating former Mayor Sheila Dixon's $83,000 annually. And if you're going to blow money on a consulting firm, at least find one in Maryland. Unbelievable! M. Trott
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Though Gov. Martin O'Malley just called a May 14 special session to deal with budget issues Friday, the General Assembly's staff and a consultant are already laying the groundwork for a possible second act in late summer. Warren Deschenaux, chief policy analyst for the Department of Legislative Services, said his staff and the firm of Price Waterhouse have begun preparations for a study of the issues surrounding an expansion of gambling in Maryland. Price Waterhouse is already under contract with the department to conduct studies for the state commission that decides where slot machines can be located.
NEWS
February 22, 2010
As a current female student at a local university where almost 30 percent of the students smoke, Thomas H. Maugh's article "Study: Smoking adds risk for HPV-linked head, neck tumors" (Feb. 16) caught my attention by attributing the human papillomavirus (HPV) to a number of tumors in the heads and necks of patients, as well as linking these tumors to patients who were current or former tobacco users. HPV is a common virus that is passed on through genital contact, most often during sex. There is a vaccine that prevents about 70 percent of the 40 types of HPV that cause most cases of cervical cancer.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
We have a joke in my house that whenever the boys are out of sorts, we attribute it to puberty. It turns out, this might not be so funny. New research shows that boys, like girls, are reaching puberty earlier - as young as 9 in some cases. A study released this month by the American Academy of Pediatrics found that boys are starting puberty nearly two years earlier than boys did a generation ago. The study analyzed reports from more than 200 doctors in 41 states who examined more than 4,000 boys during wellness checkups.
NEWS
April 6, 2014
As expected, Mike Tidwell of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network writes that the proposed Cove Point natural gas plant needs to be studied more and various state and federal agencies should weigh in ( "Shipping LNG overseas is an ecological mistake," April 3). Of course, his organization will oppose this project no matter how many times it is studied since that is their agenda. What Mr. Tidwell really wants is to tie up the project for years in never-ending lawsuits and bureaucratic red tape.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young called Monday for a hearing on whether the city should charge passengers a fee to ride the Charm City Circulator, the popular bus service that now connects more than 4 million Baltimoreans and visitors to work, school and entertainment in the city for free. Young wants to review the $7 million annual cost of running the service and determine whether the city can afford it. But his suggestion of charging $1 a trip drew criticism from riders and others.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The workers who staff the federal government in Washington are whiter, richer, more educated and more liberal than the rest of the country, according to two political scientists at Johns Hopkins University —who warn of the potential for a troubling gap between the federal workforce and the people it serves. "It might be a problem," said Jennifer Bachner, director of the Hopkins' master's degree program in government analytics. "If the government looks very different demographically than the American people, the question is: Can they govern well?
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
GAME PLAN: Gary Kubiak constructed a strategy that heavily involved veteran wide receiver Steve Smith as he was targeted 10 times against his former team. The Ravens trust Smith in every situation: short, intermediate and deep. It was a balanced approach with a few more deep shots than usual. The Ravens ran the football 30 times for 127 yards and two touchdowns, with 31 passes for 327 yards and three touchdowns. Although it was primarily Smith's day to be featured, quarterback Joe Flacco distributed the football to eight different targets.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Industry growth and a tide of employee retirements in Baltimore's transportation sector will create or leave open thousands of jobs by 2020, but local job seekers aren't prepared to fill them, according to a study released Monday by the Opportunity Collaborative. Low-income residents lack the needed technical training or have criminal records that make them ineligible for the jobs, according to the study by the coalition of state agencies, local governments, universities and nonprofits tasked with plotting a course toward sustainable economic growth for the Baltimore region.
NEWS
Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
An American doctor who was exposed to Ebola while volunteering to treat patients with the virus in Sierra Leone was admitted to the National Institute of Health in Bethesda on Sunday, the institute said. The patient will be treated at the NIH Clinical Center's Special Clinical Studies Unit, which is "specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities" and staffed by experts on infectious diseases and critical care, according to an NIH release. "The unit staff is trained in strict infection control practices optimized to prevent spread of potentially transmissible agents such as Ebola," the institute said.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 26, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -- Indiana coach Kevin Wilson never worked under Mike Leach, and he was never on a staff with West Virginia coach Dana Holgorsen. But Wilson runs the same type of up-tempo, Air Raid offense that Holgorsen learned under Leach at Texas Tech and now employs with the Mountaineers. The Hoosiers (2-1) run the ball more than most Air Raid-style offenses, but Wilson's offense plays fast and has proven capable of putting up a lot of points. Stopping that offense figures to be key for Maryland (3-1)
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
A major new study bolsters the view that food allergies are among the nation's most common medical conditions, and researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and elsewhere believe the problem is growing. The newly released study, perhaps the largest study of food allergies, showed that about 7.5 million people, or almost three in 100 people in the U.S., have a potentially life-threatening allergy to peanuts, dairy, eggs or shellfish. Children, as well as men and African-Americans, have higher rates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Eating chocolate can make you thin, new study shows. The article, Association Between More Frequent Chocolate Consumption and Lower Body Mass Index , was published Tuesday in the Archives of Internal Medicine . The full text of the article costs $30 bucks to look at, which you could spend on chocolate instead and start getting in shape for swimsuit season. The study, which was performed by scientists at the University of California, La Jolla, appears to show that "chocolate consumption shows favorable metabolic associations with blood pressure , insulin sensitivity and cholesterol level.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
A satellite that has been hurtling toward Mars for the past 10 months slammed on the brakes Sunday night, gliding into the red planet's gravity field to spend a year studying its atmosphere - and hopefully collect evidence that Mars might once have supported life. On a mission managed from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, the MAVEN spacecraft neared completion Sunday night of a 442 million-mile journey by firing six thrusters in reverse and being pulled into Mars' gravity field.
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