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By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 24, 2000
STRICTLY AS advertised, Studs Terkel comes to talk. He sits there Tuesday evening, at the Bibelot book store in Pikesville, in blue blazer with red sweater and red-and-white-checked shirt beneath it, with tufts of white hair bursting from the center of his head like the sprouts atop a pineapple, and he's off and running before they even turn on the microphone. "What I know about technology," he mutters as they wire him for sound, "you could fit into Tom Thumb's fingernail." And then, "They talk about electronic hardware today.
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NEWS
November 1, 2008
STUDS TERKEL, 96 Pulitzer Prize-winning author, activist Pulitzer Prize-winning author and activist Studs Terkel has died at age 96. Colleague and close friend Thom Clark said Mr. Terkel's son, Dan Terkell, confirmed his death yesterday. He died at home at 2:40 p.m., Mr. Clark said. Mr. Terkel is best known for his street-wise portrayals of the working class. He contrasted rich and poor along the same Chicago street in the 1966 novel Division Street: America, explored the Depression in 1970's Hard Times and chronicled how people felt about their jobs in 1974's Working.
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FEATURES
By Frank J. Prial and Frank J. Prial,New York Times News Service | May 6, 1992
CHICAGO -- The Mercedes came tooling down Michigan Avenue. It swerved to the curb and a white woman in her 30s poked her head out the passenger side window."
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Bishop John Roland Schol leads the United Methodist Church in the Baltimore-Washington area, which includes 1,000 ministers and more than 200,000 parishioners. Schol has a Master of Divinity degree and Doctor of Ministry degree from Boston University School of Theology. He assumed his present position in 2004. The Bible The Bible has really changed my life and continues to shape my life as I think about God, the world and my relationship with both. "The Holy Man" / by Susan Trott / Riverhead / 192 pages / $13 This book is really about people searching for life's answers, and what I learned from that book is that the answers are in the questions, and it is in the journey that we find meaning in life and not at the end of the road.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 15, 1995
Louis Terkel was so captivated in the mid-1930s by James T. Farrell's mighty novel of the discontent of concrete-tough urban youth that when he found himself in a squad of other men named Louis, he adopted the moniker of the eponymous Studs Lonigan. (Ah, for the days when you could use the word "moniker" with a straight pen.)Mr. Terkel was no kid then, and those days were none too palmy. Born in 1912, he got a law degree from the University of Chicago - in the abyss of the Great Depression.
NEWS
November 1, 2008
STUDS TERKEL, 96 Pulitzer Prize-winning author, activist Pulitzer Prize-winning author and activist Studs Terkel has died at age 96. Colleague and close friend Thom Clark said Mr. Terkel's son, Dan Terkell, confirmed his death yesterday. He died at home at 2:40 p.m., Mr. Clark said. Mr. Terkel is best known for his street-wise portrayals of the working class. He contrasted rich and poor along the same Chicago street in the 1966 novel Division Street: America, explored the Depression in 1970's Hard Times and chronicled how people felt about their jobs in 1974's Working.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 1997
"My American Century," by Studs Terkel. The New Press. 544 pages. $25. He is a legend, and the custodian of American democracy. In eight oral histories, whose themes range from the Great Depression and World War II to racism and aging, Studs Terkel has probed the national psyche. "My American Century," a "quasi-anthology," offers a sampling of these extraordinary books, and it is a rare treat and a privilege to have it.Terkel arrives armed. "Objectivity has escaped me," he says, tongue in cheek.
NEWS
By PATRICK BROGAN and PATRICK BROGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1995
"Coming of Age: The Story of Our Century by Those Who've Lived It," by Studs Terkel. New York: The New Press. 468 pages. $25 If you watch much television and read the glossies, you're told that mainstream America is an altogether homogenous place, everyone with the same values, laxative and minivan. True, there are crooks, nasties and homeless minority welfare mothers just around the corner, but TV's virtual reality keeps them in their place.Studs Terkel tells you otherwise. He offers oral histories of real people, authentic Americans, with all their splendid diversity and quirkiness, and their varied experiences.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | April 7, 1993
Can we talk? Sure, but chances are Studs Terkel will be listening in.Because listening is what Studs Terkel does best. A Chicago radio and TV talk-show host for nearly five decades, he's made a career out of using the well-placed question and a running tape recorder. Ask and get out of the way, basically, but that's the art of Studs Terkel. He's done nine well-received books, most of them best sellers, simply by picking out a cross-section of Americans and letting them talk about their jobs, or the American dream, or the war, or race.
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Bishop John Roland Schol leads the United Methodist Church in the Baltimore-Washington area, which includes 1,000 ministers and more than 200,000 parishioners. Schol has a Master of Divinity degree and Doctor of Ministry degree from Boston University School of Theology. He assumed his present position in 2004. The Bible The Bible has really changed my life and continues to shape my life as I think about God, the world and my relationship with both. "The Holy Man" / by Susan Trott / Riverhead / 192 pages / $13 This book is really about people searching for life's answers, and what I learned from that book is that the answers are in the questions, and it is in the journey that we find meaning in life and not at the end of the road.
NEWS
By Jon Meacham and Jon Meacham,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
Touch and Go By Studs Terkel New Press / 270 pages / $24.95 In the beginning, before blogs, there was Studs Terkel, who, more than anyone else in what Time-Life founder Henry Luce called the American Century, gave the great mass of Americans who were not Henry Luce a way to be heard. "I have, after a fashion, been celebrated for having celebrated the lives of the uncelebrated among us; for lending voice to the face in the crowd," Terkel, now 95, writes in Touch and Go, his new memoir.
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
HE HAS BEEN THE WORKing man's interviewer for longer than one can remember without looking it up. Author and oral historian Louis "Studs" Terkel -- he of summer heart surgery, he who gave us Working -- now is treating readers to his childhood passion: music. And They All Sang (New Press) is Terkel's 16th book but his first collection of interviews mined from his storied career as a disc jockey. "As an asthmatic child of eight, hearing came to me with much more ease than breathing. Bound to the hearth, I heard music I might otherwise have missed," Terkel, 93, wrote in the book's introduction.
NEWS
July 9, 2004
Charles E. Andrews, 88, a writer at the dawn of television who helped create an informal, intimate approach to programming for Dave Garroway, Studs Terkel and other early stars, died July 2 in New York City. As the writer for Mr. Terkel's show, Studs' Place, which chronicled the activities at a mythical bar and grill, Mr. Andrews wrote an outline of the plot. Actors then made up their lines. "Dialogue by the Cast," the closing credits read. When Mr. Garroway moved from Chicago to New York to become the first host of the Today program in 1952, Mr. Andrews continued to work with him. Later, he wrote for Sid Caesar and produced The Arthur Godfrey Show, The Steve Allen Show and Candid Camera, among other programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul R. McHugh and By Paul R. McHugh,Special to the Sun | October 14, 2001
Will the Circle be Unbroken? Reflections on Death, Rebirth, and Hunger for a Faith, by Studs Terkel. The New Press. 407 pages. $25.95. Studs Terkel has published another collection of interviews continuing on his path as a cracker-barrel philosopher producing and promoting ideas for our consumption from folksy conversations with people who have had an experience he wants to explore and to explain. He calls this oral history, but it's just talk and flippant talk at that. He has previously published interviews on working and on war, chosen to support his left-wing stance on social and political matters.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 24, 2000
STRICTLY AS advertised, Studs Terkel comes to talk. He sits there Tuesday evening, at the Bibelot book store in Pikesville, in blue blazer with red sweater and red-and-white-checked shirt beneath it, with tufts of white hair bursting from the center of his head like the sprouts atop a pineapple, and he's off and running before they even turn on the microphone. "What I know about technology," he mutters as they wire him for sound, "you could fit into Tom Thumb's fingernail." And then, "They talk about electronic hardware today.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2000
The man who has spent his life helping America remember believes that the country has succumbed to "national Alzheimer's" disease. All information, little knowledge. And scant wisdom. "We don't remember anything. There's no yesterday in this country, and I want to re-create those yesterdays," says Studs Terkel, the dean of oral historians whose adventures with a tape recorder have secured the life lessons of hobos, soldiers and losers for all time. "The free market is God now, but we forgot what happened in the 1930s -- that people were crying for the government to save their asses and that the people who condemn government [regulation]
NEWS
July 9, 2004
Charles E. Andrews, 88, a writer at the dawn of television who helped create an informal, intimate approach to programming for Dave Garroway, Studs Terkel and other early stars, died July 2 in New York City. As the writer for Mr. Terkel's show, Studs' Place, which chronicled the activities at a mythical bar and grill, Mr. Andrews wrote an outline of the plot. Actors then made up their lines. "Dialogue by the Cast," the closing credits read. When Mr. Garroway moved from Chicago to New York to become the first host of the Today program in 1952, Mr. Andrews continued to work with him. Later, he wrote for Sid Caesar and produced The Arthur Godfrey Show, The Steve Allen Show and Candid Camera, among other programs.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 1997
"My American Century," by Studs Terkel. The New Press. 544 pages. $25. He is a legend, and the custodian of American democracy. In eight oral histories, whose themes range from the Great Depression and World War II to racism and aging, Studs Terkel has probed the national psyche. "My American Century," a "quasi-anthology," offers a sampling of these extraordinary books, and it is a rare treat and a privilege to have it.Terkel arrives armed. "Objectivity has escaped me," he says, tongue in cheek.
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