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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2005
Amelia's Journey, an original musical about America's most famous female pilot, opens tonight at Chesapeake Arts Center's Studio Theatre, where it premiered one year ago to sold-out houses for the entire run. Long fascinated with Amelia Earhart's story, Annapolis attorney and composer-lyricist Doug Schenker composed a musical about the pilot, whose fame was the creation of publisher-promoter George Palmer Putnam. About 10 years ago, Schenker engaged local playwright Linda Page to join him in bringing theatrical life to Earhart and Putnam, tracing the relationship from their first meeting in 1928 until her disappearance in 1937.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
When the reign of Oliver Cromwell and his fellow killjoys ended, one of the first things the new English king did was order the theaters to reopen. Charles II didn't stop there. He allowed those theaters to do something previously unthinkable — engage women to act onstage. If that didn't signal the fall of Puritanism, nothing would. Those wild and crazy1660s also saw the rise of England's first successful female playwright, Aphra Behn. And that chapter from the Restoration inspired "Or," a comic work by Liz Duffy Adams that receives its regional premiere this week from Rep Stage in Columbia.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2001
The first multiperformance show at Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts' intimate Studio Theatre - an Actors Company Theatre production of Neil Simon's semiautobiographical comedy, "Jake's Women" - opens March 2 for a two-weekend run. I checked out the theater Saturday, attending a piano concert, and found it delightful, with stadium seating that allows everyone to be close to the stage. It has extensive lighting that includes controllable overhead spots and floodlights, plus background projection.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2008
Performances Alice -- Towson University Center for the Arts, Mainstage Theatre, 8000 York Road, Towson / 410-704-2787. 10:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. Jan. 17, 8 p.m. Jan. 18-19 and 2 p.m. Jan. 20. $10-$15. Buster Keaton short films with live scores by Chuck Heavey -- Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. / 410-276-1651. 7:30 p.m. Jan. 26. $8-$12. Creation -- Round House Theatre, 8641 Colesville Road, Silver Spring / 240-644-1100. 10:30 a.m., 8 p.m. Jan. 18. Also at Towson University Center for the Arts, Studio Theatre 8 p.m. Jan. 24 and 26 and 1 p.m. Jan. 27. $10-$15.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
When the reign of Oliver Cromwell and his fellow killjoys ended, one of the first things the new English king did was order the theaters to reopen. Charles II didn't stop there. He allowed those theaters to do something previously unthinkable — engage women to act onstage. If that didn't signal the fall of Puritanism, nothing would. Those wild and crazy1660s also saw the rise of England's first successful female playwright, Aphra Behn. And that chapter from the Restoration inspired "Or," a comic work by Liz Duffy Adams that receives its regional premiere this week from Rep Stage in Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2008
Performances Alice -- Towson University Center for the Arts, Mainstage Theatre, 8000 York Road, Towson / 410-704-2787. 10:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. Jan. 17, 8 p.m. Jan. 18-19 and 2 p.m. Jan. 20. $10-$15. Buster Keaton short films with live scores by Chuck Heavey -- Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. / 410-276-1651. 7:30 p.m. Jan. 26. $8-$12. Creation -- Round House Theatre, 8641 Colesville Road, Silver Spring / 240-644-1100. 10:30 a.m., 8 p.m. Jan. 18. Also at Towson University Center for the Arts, Studio Theatre 8 p.m. Jan. 24 and 26 and 1 p.m. Jan. 27. $10-$15.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | September 27, 2007
I saw a production of My Children! My Africa! at Studio Theatre in Washington the other night, and it broke my heart. In 1984, Athol Fugard wrote a play about racial tensions exploding at a high school in apartheid South Africa. His drama is a powerful lament about the shameful waste of bright, shining young lives. If you go My Children! My Africa! runs through Oct. 21 at the Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. N.W., Washington. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m., 7 p.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 15, 2000
Towson University's Maryland Arts Festival kicks off tonight with a production of "Full Gallop," Mark Hampton's one-woman show about fashion legend Diana Vreeland, the late editor of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Maravene Loeschke, Towson's dean of fine arts and communication, stars under the direction of her husband, C. Richard Gillespie, founder of the theater program. Three other stage shows will be presented during this summer's festival: "Noises Off" (June 24-July 15), on the mainstage of the Center for the Arts; "The World Goes 'Round" (July 7-29)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2001
Saturday marked the first time that performances were simultaneously held at both theaters at the new Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts in Anne Arundel County. "Tim O'Brien and the Crossing" was staged in the main, larger theater, and "Jake's Women" was offered in the Studio Theatre. Although you'd think it would be annoying, we were happy to find the parking lot filled with the large turnout for live theater. The mood, as we walked to the theater, was reminiscent of the magical "field of dreams" evening three years ago when nearly 1,000 people filled the old auditorium to share the dream of building an arts center in Brooklyn Park.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2001
Saturday marked the first time that performances were simultaneously held at both theaters at the new Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts. "Tim O'Brien and the Crossing" was staged in the main, larger theater, and "Jake's Women" was offered in the Studio Theatre. Although you'd think it would be annoying, we were happy to find the parking lot filled with the large turnout for live theater. The mood, as we walked to the theater, was reminiscent of the magical "field of dreams" evening three years ago when nearly 1,000 people filled the old auditorium to share the dream of building an arts center in Brooklyn Park.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | September 27, 2007
I saw a production of My Children! My Africa! at Studio Theatre in Washington the other night, and it broke my heart. In 1984, Athol Fugard wrote a play about racial tensions exploding at a high school in apartheid South Africa. His drama is a powerful lament about the shameful waste of bright, shining young lives. If you go My Children! My Africa! runs through Oct. 21 at the Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. N.W., Washington. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m., 7 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | July 27, 2007
The set of the latest play staged at the Chesapeake Arts Center might look vaguely familiar to regulars of the elegant restaurant and bar in Baltimore's historic Belvedere Hotel. Playwright Mark Scharf set his 15th play produced by the Baltimore Playwrights Festival, Last Night at the Owl Bar, a haunt he's long admired. Of the Owl Bar location, Scharf quoted his central character Jonathan Caldwell: "I like it here because it's nicer than most places. I love the exposed brick and the polished wood.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2007
With its production of A Little Princess at Chesapeake Arts Center Studio Theatre, Merely Players continues its tradition of bringing together intergenerational casts and behind-the-scenes youths and parents to provide high-quality theater. The show, which I believe is new to our area, is based on the children's story by Frances Hodgson Burnett. John Vreeke adapted A Little Princess for the stage with music by Will Severin and George David Weiss. Burnett, who also wrote Little Lord Fauntleroy, The Lost Prince and The Secret Garden, was adept at adding romance to her characters' difficult lives to create uplifting stories.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | January 19, 2007
Judging from their reaction, it seems that Tom Sawyer still enchants new generations of young fans. At least a fifth of the audience at Sunday's performance of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Chesapeake Arts Center's Studio Theatre were children. They frowned with concern as Tom witnessed a murder in the graveyard, snickered when his tattletale half-brother, Sid, got a reprimand from Aunt Polly and laughed openly when at his own funeral Tom pestered Sid by repeatedly touching his ankle from under a sofa.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2005
Amelia's Journey, an original musical about America's most famous female pilot, opens tonight at Chesapeake Arts Center's Studio Theatre, where it premiered one year ago to sold-out houses for the entire run. Long fascinated with Amelia Earhart's story, Annapolis attorney and composer-lyricist Doug Schenker composed a musical about the pilot, whose fame was the creation of publisher-promoter George Palmer Putnam. About 10 years ago, Schenker engaged local playwright Linda Page to join him in bringing theatrical life to Earhart and Putnam, tracing the relationship from their first meeting in 1928 until her disappearance in 1937.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
I Do, I Do, a nostalgic two-person musical being put on by the Musical Artists Theatre Company this weekend, is well-suited to Chesapeake Arts Center's intimate 110-seat Studio Theatre. The final performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday, and for 3 p.m. Sunday. On the evening I attended, the theater seemed full -- even though about half the seats were occupied -- by an audience of apparent regulars. A few people in the first row were engaging in subdued repartee with the principals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 8, 1991
Sadly, a production called "The Illustrated History of Violence" probably couldn't come at more appropriate time than now, in the midst of a war. But with Desert Storm raging, this satirical revue often doesn't seem trenchant enough.Produced by the Big Dog Ensemble, a new troupe created by local fight choreographer Lewis Shaw, "The Illustrated History of Violence" debuted last summer as a work in progress. And there's still a work-in-progress feel to the current version, being presented at Towson State's Studio Theatre as part of the Experimental Theatre Festival co-sponsored by the Theatre Project.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | July 27, 2007
The set of the latest play staged at the Chesapeake Arts Center might look vaguely familiar to regulars of the elegant restaurant and bar in Baltimore's historic Belvedere Hotel. Playwright Mark Scharf set his 15th play produced by the Baltimore Playwrights Festival, Last Night at the Owl Bar, a haunt he's long admired. Of the Owl Bar location, Scharf quoted his central character Jonathan Caldwell: "I like it here because it's nicer than most places. I love the exposed brick and the polished wood.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2002
Shortly before the Chesapeake Arts Center opened in Brooklyn Park in late 2000, a group of Baltimore professionals formed Musical Artists Theatre to develop original musicals, showcase contemporary American works and mount innovative productions of classics at this new facility. Having produced its original Christmas Carol at Chesapeake Arts Center's Main Theatre in December and an original show Rags to Riches set to the music of Scott Joplin at the center's Studio Theatre in May, Musical Artists Theatre now opens its third show: Dreamland.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2001
Saturday marked the first time that performances were simultaneously held at both theaters at the new Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts in Anne Arundel County. "Tim O'Brien and the Crossing" was staged in the main, larger theater, and "Jake's Women" was offered in the Studio Theatre. Although you'd think it would be annoying, we were happy to find the parking lot filled with the large turnout for live theater. The mood, as we walked to the theater, was reminiscent of the magical "field of dreams" evening three years ago when nearly 1,000 people filled the old auditorium to share the dream of building an arts center in Brooklyn Park.
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