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NEWS
By Neal Gabler | August 24, 1995
THE FOXES ARE finally in the Hollywood chicken coop, or at least one might be excused for thinking so. Sylvester Stallone signed a reported three-picture, $60 million contract at MCA/Universal shortly after his former agent, Ron Meyer, was picked to run the studio.And one can only imagine what the installation of the world's most powerful agent, Michael Ovitz, as the chief executive at Disney might portend for his old clients.After years of grumbling about Ovitz and his Creative Artist Agency's alleged high-handedness in brokering with the studios for talent, the studio chieftains seem to have surrendered by inviting Ovitz and Meyer into the system.
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NEWS
By Neal Gabler | August 24, 1995
THE FOXES ARE finally in the Hollywood chicken coop, or at least one might be excused for thinking so. Sylvester Stallone signed a reported three-picture, $60 million contract at MCA/Universal shortly after his former agent, Ron Meyer, was picked to run the studio.And one can only imagine what the installation of the world's most powerful agent, Michael Ovitz, as the chief executive at Disney might portend for his old clients.After years of grumbling about Ovitz and his Creative Artist Agency's alleged high-handedness in brokering with the studios for talent, the studio chieftains seem to have surrendered by inviting Ovitz and Meyer into the system.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 31, 1993
Everybody agrees: They're not making them the way they used to.But nobody's noticed: They're not selling them the way they used to, either.There was a period in American film history when movie marketing, particularly at the lower echelons of the business, used to be one degree removed from carny barking, a bodacious brand of sucker's hustle more akin to the midways of state fairs than the sleek environs of an advertising firm. Now, of course, there's much too much at stake for anybody to have any dirty fun selling movies.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 31, 1993
Everybody agrees: They're not making them the way they used to.But nobody's noticed: They're not selling them the way they used to, either.There was a period in American film history when movie marketing, particularly at the lower echelons of the business, used to be one degree removed from carny barking, a bodacious brand of sucker's hustle more akin to the midways of state fairs than the sleek environs of an advertising firm. Now, of course, there's much too much at stake for anybody to have any dirty fun selling movies.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | August 25, 1996
"James Stewart: A Biography," by Donald Dewey. Turner Publishing. 521 pages, $24.95.On screen James Stewart played anybody's son. He was the vulnerable, unthreatening hero, kind-hearted and plain-talking, a voice of reason and common sense. His performances were characterized by a monologue he spoke in a slow drawl, every sound scrupulously enunciated, evoking the small town of Indiana, Pa, where he was born. Stewart created a stereotype of the quintessential American, nowhere better than in Frank Capra's "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (1939)
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 30, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- "Rambling Rose," the wistful story of a young woman's romances and her impact on an upstanding Southern family, was named best American film produced outside of the Hollywood studio system at Saturday's Independent Spirit Awards party."
NEWS
January 5, 1993
Stephen HarveyAssociate film curatorBROOKLYN, N.Y. -- Stephen Harvey, associate curator of film the Museum of Modern Art, died of AIDS-related complications Friday at age 43.A film curator at the Museum of Modern Art since 1972, he had organized major retrospectives and programs on such film figures as Vincente Minnelli, Vittorio de Sica and Joseph Mankiewicz.His book, "Directed by Vincente Minnelli," published in 1990 by HarperCollins, is widely considered the definitive study of Minnelli and the MGM studio system of his time.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | September 2, 1994
Besides being films, what do the early work of John Cassavetes, the current work of Hal Hartley, Bernard Tavernier's "L.667," "The Last Picture Show," "Suture," "One False Move," "Carnal Knowledge," "Chinatown," "Strictly Ballroom" and "Chameleon Street" have in common?According to director Steven Soderbergh, whose 1989 film "sex, lies and videotape" took top prize at the Cannes Film Festival, they're all "impact films" -- the kind of "terrific, smart, ambitious" independent films that today's major Hollywood studios wouldn't interested in.He also says that they're the kind of films that Bravo's Independent Film Channel, which was launched yesterday, is interested in showing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Sun Staff | March 20, 2005
The Big Picture. The New Logic of Money and Power in Hollywood By Edward Jay Epstein. Random House. 381 pages. $25.95. Each week, most newspapers publish the movie industry's Top 10 weekly box office grosses. To the press and to most consumers, this chart is the barometer of financial success for films. But as well-respected journalist Edward Jay Epstein writes in his meticulously reported new book, The Big Picture, the size of those box office receipts has little to do in defining success in today's Hollywood.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2006
Happy Feet, an animated musical centering on an emperor penguin who can't sing a lick (unlike all the other penguins, for whom singing is a birthright and who do so incessantly), will be playing on the Maryland Science Center's IMAX screen beginning today. Showtimes this weekend are 10 a.m., 4:25 p.m. and 8 p.m. today; 10 a.m., 5:35 p.m. and 8 p.m. tomorrow; 10 a.m., 12:10 p.m. and 2:15 p.m. Sunday. The science center is at 601 Light St. Additional showtimes and ticket information: 410-685-5225 or mdsci.
FEATURES
By michael sragow and michael sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 23, 2007
The 2007 Oscar ballot has been rightly hailed for its diversity. So it might seem like a paradox that the closest thing to a sure shot is about as white Anglo-Saxon Protestant as you can get: Dame Helen Mirren, the prohibitive favorite to win best actress for playing Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen. Even the other dame in the running, Judi Dench for Notes of a Scandal, has conceded the position. This year's entries generally remind us that the Academy Awards, at their best, have saluted an aristocracy of merit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 5, 1993
Washington -- You walk into the hotel room and there's this kid there, maybe to fix the phone or to work on the plumbing or something, but, you think, where's the director?L Of course, in a second, you get it. The kid is the director.In his early 30s, in blue jeans and work shirt, puffing on a Marlboro Light, Steve Kloves looks like anything but what he is, which is a veteran movie guy with a very good film blinking in lights behind him ("The Fabulous Baker Boys") and a very good one blinking in lights before him ("Flesh and Bone."
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