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By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
A little more than a month ago, in his second appearance on the NBC show America's Got Talent, a portly 12-year-old named LD Miller ripped into a harmonica solo the way a starving man might tear into a loaf of bread. His roof-shaking riffs on "Use Me," a Bill Withers wailer, wowed a studio audience and so stunned judges that they waved him through to the show's final round. He and his brother, Cole, who sings and plays guitar, are due to appear on the show tonight, when they will compete for the $1 million grand prize.
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By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
A little more than a month ago, in his second appearance on the NBC show America's Got Talent, a portly 12-year-old named LD Miller ripped into a harmonica solo the way a starving man might tear into a loaf of bread. His roof-shaking riffs on "Use Me," a Bill Withers wailer, wowed a studio audience and so stunned judges that they waved him through to the show's final round. He and his brother, Cole, who sings and plays guitar, are due to appear on the show tonight, when they will compete for the $1 million grand prize.
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By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1997
The woman looked down at the scale, gasped and shrieked, "Eight pounds!" Quickly, the camera switched to a wide shot of the studio audience, which was making like a crowd that had just witnessed a home run to win the seventh game of the World Series.Jumping, cheering, high-fives and lots of teeth, everyone, combed and coiffed, dressed smartly, bright-eyed and attentive. In other words, not your typical studio audience at the "Jerry Springer Show."Now it's back to the woman standing on the scale and she's doing all she can to maintain her composure.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1999
The television studio taping was a showcase of political correctness until 16-year-old Frank Camden from Catonsville High School joined the stage and announced he thinks affirmative action should go.The studio audience fell silent. Cameras zoomed in for reaction. A female voice hissed, "No, he didn't."Oh, yes, he did. And it was exactly what the producers of "Your Turn," a Court TV teen-age talk show, wanted.The Washington-based crew set up its cameras at Howard Community College yesterday for a discussion with local teens about racial stereotypes -- issues ranging from so-called driving while black to affirmative action to black-on-black pressure not to succeed in school.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1999
The television studio taping was a showcase of political correctness until 16-year-old Frank Camden from Catonsville High School joined the stage and announced he thinks affirmative action should go.The studio audience fell silent. Cameras zoomed in for reaction. A female voice hissed, "No, he didn't."Oh, yes, he did. And it was exactly what the producers of "Your Turn," a Court TV teen-age talk show, wanted.The Washington-based crew set up its cameras at Howard Community College yesterday for a discussion with local teens about racial stereotypes -- issues ranging from so-called driving while black to affirmative action to black-on-black pressure not to succeed in school.
FEATURES
By Diane Holloway and Diane Holloway,Cox News Service | May 26, 1992
If you're planning a vacation in Los Angeles this summer and want to attend a television show taping, now is the time to start planning.It's possible to get in at the last minute, but it's more hit-and-miss that way.There are several things you need to know up front, before you get your heart set on watching your favorite stars in action.* Not all series tape in front of a studio audience. None of the hourlong drama shows have an audience, and neither do some of the filmed (rather than taped)
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 16, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- As midnight approached in the East, the deadline for the possibility of war, it was 9 p.m. in the West. Outside Stage 25 on the Paramount studio lot, a security guard huddled over his tiny portable television set.Two other workers on the lot saw the blue glow and hurried over.lTC "What's happening?" one asked."Nada," the guard replied.Inside on the stage, the most popular television show in America was filming an episode, trying to make comedy around the bar set that the country knows as "Cheers."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 20, 1992
Let's be fair. In her very first utterance, Roseanne Arnold at least warns viewers of her cable special that she is not, ahem, a happy person. In fact, she employs a common, effective crudity that cannot comfortably be repeated here.Then for a long, long 60 minutes, the star of television's most popular sitcom goes on to detail why she is every bit as disgruntled with the world as she suggests upfront. ("HBO Comedy Hour: Roseanne Arnold" premieres at 10:30 tonight.)Many comics are clowns with bleeding hearts, the cliche asserts, but at least they usually make us laugh.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1994
Los Angeles -- "Hi. Nice to meet you," says Ellen DeGeneres to a reporter visiting her in Los Angeles. "But I've got to leave."She walks out of the public relations office. The stunned reporter did, after all, have to fly 3,000 miles and sit through a Michael J. Fox in-flight movie. All that for no interview, no nothing.Then, Ms. DeGeneres looks back and cracks open a six-pack of a smile. Ellen DeGeneres is not leaving.She has just arrived.Ms. DeGeneres is becoming a household face -- if not name.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 24, 1990
What would comedy writers do without politicians, movies and especially television? Parodies of such familiar targets increasingly seem to dominate small-screen humor, as illustrated by the season premiere tonight of "Crabs," Maryland Public Television's original comedy revue beginning its seventh year.Easily half the skits in the show (at 8:30, channels 22 and 67) depend for their laughs on viewers' familiarity with media figures or institutions.Jeff Baker's introduction as President Bush, for example, seems as much an imitation of "Saturday Night Live" regular Dana Carvey doing the president.
FEATURES
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1997
The woman looked down at the scale, gasped and shrieked, "Eight pounds!" Quickly, the camera switched to a wide shot of the studio audience, which was making like a crowd that had just witnessed a home run to win the seventh game of the World Series.Jumping, cheering, high-fives and lots of teeth, everyone, combed and coiffed, dressed smartly, bright-eyed and attentive. In other words, not your typical studio audience at the "Jerry Springer Show."Now it's back to the woman standing on the scale and she's doing all she can to maintain her composure.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 20, 1992
Let's be fair. In her very first utterance, Roseanne Arnold at least warns viewers of her cable special that she is not, ahem, a happy person. In fact, she employs a common, effective crudity that cannot comfortably be repeated here.Then for a long, long 60 minutes, the star of television's most popular sitcom goes on to detail why she is every bit as disgruntled with the world as she suggests upfront. ("HBO Comedy Hour: Roseanne Arnold" premieres at 10:30 tonight.)Many comics are clowns with bleeding hearts, the cliche asserts, but at least they usually make us laugh.
FEATURES
By Diane Holloway and Diane Holloway,Cox News Service | May 26, 1992
If you're planning a vacation in Los Angeles this summer and want to attend a television show taping, now is the time to start planning.It's possible to get in at the last minute, but it's more hit-and-miss that way.There are several things you need to know up front, before you get your heart set on watching your favorite stars in action.* Not all series tape in front of a studio audience. None of the hourlong drama shows have an audience, and neither do some of the filmed (rather than taped)
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 16, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- As midnight approached in the East, the deadline for the possibility of war, it was 9 p.m. in the West. Outside Stage 25 on the Paramount studio lot, a security guard huddled over his tiny portable television set.Two other workers on the lot saw the blue glow and hurried over.lTC "What's happening?" one asked."Nada," the guard replied.Inside on the stage, the most popular television show in America was filming an episode, trying to make comedy around the bar set that the country knows as "Cheers."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | May 3, 1991
Phil Donahue's guests will bare all on a show airing locally Monday, but viewers at home will see less than the whole story.Six persons, participants in an art exhibit called "LOVE-SPIT-LOVE" who say they are protesting art censorship, were taped in the buff before a studio audience Thursday."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 1, 1992
A thoughtful pun hides within the title of "The Family Works!" a new local production on WBAL (Channel 11) tonight.For it takes work to make a family work, and the WBAL program launches a two-year public affairs campaign aimed at supporting families in a time when they face extraordinary stress.Tonight's program (at 8 o'clock) begins with a half-hour taped presentation featuring actress Ann Jillian, produced by WBAL's sister Hearst Broadcasting station WCVB-TV in Boston. It explores three different family structures, a working couple, a second marriage/stepchild relationship and a multi-generational, manless family.
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