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By Julia Reed | October 14, 2013
Baltimore-based Charm City Yoga expanded into Howard County this fall with a new studio in Kings Contrivance. With seven studios in the region, Charm City Yoga offers a “style of yoga for every person,” according to founder and instructor Kim Manfredi. Particularly popular, according to Manfredi, are Charm City's hot vinyasa sessions, geared toward those looking for a vigorous practice in a heated room. A beginner vinyasa class also is available for those wanting to try out the experience without the heated environment as well as those who are “new to movement and looking to learn the fundamentals of yoga while still being in a flowing environment,” says Manfredi.
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NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard | October 2, 2014
The lights are low and the bass is thumping, but the cycle room at Rev Cycle Studio in McHenry Row is no dance club. Halfway into the studio's Rev60 Zen class -- a “fusion” of 40 minutes of cycling and 20 of yoga -- a dozen cyclists are pedaling (and sweating) hard, following instructor Esther Collinetti's demands to go harder. Fast-forward another 15 minutes. The same group is now quietly sinking into Warrior pose in the studio's small, warm yoga room, with Collinetti directing stretches and meditation.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 4, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Mark Canton, a 42-year-old film executive who once worked as a clerk in a Hollywood mailroom, was named president of Columbia Pictures yesterday and said that he would seek to accelerate the number of projects at the studio and make films that will be, he hoped, "socially relevant."After weeks of turmoil, confusion, legal wrangling and embarrassment among officials of Sony Corp., which owns Columbia, the film company announced Mr. Canton's appointment to replace Frank Price, 61, an experienced film executive who took over in March 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
When O.A.R. sold out New York's Madison Square Garden in 2006, it was the culmination of years of touring for the Rockville quintet. The grass-roots approach to building a fan base worked for a rock band whose albums have never reached higher than No. 12 on the Billboard 200. But for singer Marc Roberge, the band's living-on-the-road reputation had an unsettling undercurrent to it. "I remember one poster we had that says, 'O.A.R.: Always on...
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | March 11, 2012
As the thunderous sound of Irish hard shoes dancing filled the room, Teresa Eade sat on a stool in the corner, watching intently. The 15-year-old sophomore at South Carroll High School was recovering from a concussion she received over the weekend playing dodge ball, but that didn't prevent her from participating in the first half of the rehearsal at Teelin School for Irish Dancing. And it also wasn't going to keep her from performing with Teelin on Sunday, March 11, when the Columbia-based studio - and several of its Carroll County members - were scheduled to perform in Baltimore's annualSt.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
Baltimore schools Chief Executive Officer Bonnie S. Copeland announced last night that the city school system will replace Studio Course as the primary language arts curriculum used in its 23 traditional middle schools. The system will continue to use some of the books, generally written by minority authors and considered by teachers and experts to be high quality, that it purchased under Studio, Copeland said. However, it will make sure children are selecting books appropriate to their reading level.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Dailey News | May 30, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Four months ago a handful of studio chiefs complained that movies cost too much and promised to institute cost-containment.Warner Bros.' Robert Daly said that his studio would play hardball in negotiations with directors and lesser-known stars.Then-Paramount Pictures Chairman Frank Mancuso indicated that he would put fewer scripts into development.And Walt Disney's Jeffrey Katzenberg issued a 28-page memo that called for the studio to return to basics -- "a good story, well-executed."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 21, 2005
Lordy, I never thought I'd be writing this. Baltimore schools Chief Executive Officer Bonnie S. Copeland has been on the hot seat the past two weeks. Copeland's taking the heat for the implementation of a new middle school reading curriculum called Studio Course. Many people have a problem with Studio Course, especially that one lesson plan where a noun was defined as "stuff" and a verb as "what stuff does." There are other problems. According to an article by Sun writer Sara Neufeld, the curriculum uses magazines to encourage reading.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 1996
WOULD YOU LIKE to spend a quiet day driving through the rolling hills of Carroll County, visiting the studios of crafts people?Seven Carroll County studios will reveal hidden treasures produced by 15 juried artisans during the annual Studio Tour, which takes place Sept. 7-8. The event is sponsored by Carroll County Crafts Guild.At Whye Clay Works in Finksburg, the students of Terry Whye will be on hand to demonstrate hand building in clay. Whye's pottery and sculpture are inspired by her observations of the natural world and the study of recent feminist reinterpretations of prehistoric artifacts.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 14, 1992
Grace Hartigan had just skirted disaster -- a fire that might have destroyed an estimated $1 million-plus of her art and works by friends such as Willem de Kooning. But as usual she was looking forward, not back. "The first thing an artist wants is to get the studio together and get back to work," she said yesterday.The internationally recognized artist and Maryland Institute instructor was speaking in the wake of a fire Sunday that had temporarily driven her out of her studio at Broadway and Eastern Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
When 12-year-old Leilani Hines wanted to fly away to Neverland, she just had to close her eyes, point her toes, curve one arm above her head, and picture herself springing above the ground in the ballet move known as a grand jete. In her imagination, Leilani soared to that magical land above the floodwaters that destroyed the Morton Street Dance Center on April 30. It was a refuge from her worries that costumes, which had to be ordered 12 weeks in advance, were mud-splattered and ruined.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Baltimore arts patrons Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker have donated $1 million to the Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University to establish scholarships for students of near-legendary pianist and veteran Peabody faculty artist Leon Fleisher. In a statement released Monday, Meyerhoff called the 85-year-old Fleisher "quite simply, one of the great musicians of our time," one who "attracts stellar pianistic talents to the Peabody Institute from all over the world. " The new donation follows the $1 million Meyerhoff and Becker donated in recent years to support an endowment for undergraduate piano scholarships.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
On a rainy night in late March, the studio of WTMD looked more like the buzzing set of a classic variety show than home to Towson University's public radio station. Members of the Baltimore indie-rock group Celebration checked the sounds of their instruments as three actors from the Single Carrot Theatre rehearsed a scene from a new production. Sam Sessa , the show's host and a former Baltimore Sun editor, practiced introductions. Elsewhere, Wham City Comedy's Ben O'Brien went over lines to a monologue he would perform that night.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Hans C. Kliemisch, a 10th-degree black belt who established three karate studios, died Feb. 25 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Essex resident was 84. Mr. Kliemisch was born and raised in the Bronx, N.Y., where he attended public schools. "He lied about his age and served in the Army during World War II," said his daughter, Kimberly Moss of Virginia Beach, Va. "He later served in the Navy during the Korean War. " In 1954, Mr. Kliemisch moved to Baltimore and went to work at Sparrows Point in Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s tin mill, from which he retired in 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
 You've read about their clashing views in all of those 5-4 Supreme Court decisions. Now hear them sing their arguments. "Scalia/Ginsburg," a comic opera by Baltimore native and recent law school grad Derrick Wang, imagines Justice Antonin Scalia having to get through three ordeals -- shades of Mozart's "The Magic Flute" -- with the help of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. In the summer of 2013, excerpts from the work-in-progress were performed at the Supreme Court for Scalia and Ginsburg, two longtime friends and opera fans who gave the project a thumbs up. "It was such a great honor," Wang says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Mera Rubell - a 70-year-old formerly penniless Jewish Russian refugee turned Head Start teacher turned hotel mogul turned art collector extraordinaire - is the kind of person who just naturally acquires an entourage. For example, a recent tour of Baltimore's art scene began quietly at 8:40 a.m. with just one car and six sleepy occupants. Eight hours later, the caravan that pulled up outside the Charles Village home of paper artist Cara Ober had grown to three vehicles containing at least 14 people, including four reporters and photographers.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
The future of Studio Course in Baltimore middle schools was thrown into doubt yesterday after the release of a report showing the language arts curriculum is not preparing pupils for the state's standardized tests. City schools Chief Executive Officer Bonnie S. Copeland, who commissioned a review of the curriculum after criticism resulting from a Sun article, issued a statement showing plans to tweak Studio but continue using it. School board Chairman Brian D. Morris, however, said that Studio "will be subject to intense scrutiny" by the school board and Copeland's administration after the Maryland School Assessments next month.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
Striving to blend education, entertainment and tourism while boosting viewership, Maryland Public Television plans to open a 150-seat studio for live programs at Port Discovery, the downtown children's museum being designed by Walt Disney Co.Leaders of MPT and the nonprofit museum said yesterday that live shows from the studio would focus on everything from political debates and educational programs about the Chesapeake Bay to New Year's Eve on the harbor...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Watching baseball on television is one of the great joys of my life. But I have to be honest. By the end of the year, I couldn't watch the Orioles any more on MASN. I was so mad about them playing without a sense of playoff urgency - and the MASN announcers refusing to call any of them out. I could not stand to hear manager Buck Showalter or his players stand there, loss after winnable loss, talking about how "resilient" they were and how they had to just keep "grinding" while the MASN talent nodded in dumb agreement.
NEWS
By Julia Reed | October 14, 2013
Baltimore-based Charm City Yoga expanded into Howard County this fall with a new studio in Kings Contrivance. With seven studios in the region, Charm City Yoga offers a “style of yoga for every person,” according to founder and instructor Kim Manfredi. Particularly popular, according to Manfredi, are Charm City's hot vinyasa sessions, geared toward those looking for a vigorous practice in a heated room. A beginner vinyasa class also is available for those wanting to try out the experience without the heated environment as well as those who are “new to movement and looking to learn the fundamentals of yoga while still being in a flowing environment,” says Manfredi.
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