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September 27, 1998
Susan Rapp of the Village Reading Center responds to a question she often hears.For the past six years I've taught reading to second-graders using a whole language approach. Now our school is emphasizing more phonics along with whole language in the primary grades. Isn't teaching phonics primarily teaching rules that the students must memorize?In learning phonics, students learn both the connections between letters and sounds and the generalizations behind these connections. For example: For the short vowels, an important generalization is that when a word has one vowel followed by one consonant, the sound will be short, as in am, cat, him, sun. It is the sound you hear in the first part of ap-ple.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Zachary Roselle has never gambled in a casino, but by late July he hopes to snag one of the better-paying jobs on the floor of the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. "I've been a card game player for a long time," said Roselle, a 22-year-old gas station cashier from Curtis Bay. "My dad always told me if I had to play cards all the time, I might as well get paid for it. " Roselle, one of 400 students in Horseshoe's dealer academy, says running games such as blackjack and roulette would come with other benefits.
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 2, 1993
This summer, as they have for the past two years, some patient and diligent Waverly-area children have been assembling the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Waverly branch at 33rd and Barclay streets. They are learning the disappearing art of letter writing. Every few months, they compose and send correspondence to fellow students they've never met in Maryborough, Australia, a town of 8,000 residents in the sheep-raising country outside of Melbourne."I've never had a group of children who were as motivated and as persistent as these are. In an age when it's difficult to get children to read, these children are writing as well," said children's librarian Linda Schwartz.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | March 25, 2014
Accused of not hanging up their jackets, two defendants giggled and squirmed in their seats like schoolgirls, which they were. "How do you plead?" asked Leila Pearsall, 8, of Hamilton. "Guilty," said the girls, also 8, who had the option of paying 50-cent fines or being brought up on charges. They were sentenced to 25 minutes of community service: cleaning the play room. The setting was the Judicial Committee room at Arts & Ideas Sudbury School, also known as AI Sudbury. The 6-year-old alternative school, founded in Hamilton and operated as a democratic community managed by students and staff, moved this year to the old St. John's Episcopal Church at Kelly Avenue and South Street in Mount Washington.
NEWS
By Bonnie Wilson | August 30, 2001
PERHAPS no single group receives more advice than first-year college students. As the incoming class of 2005 prepares for its first taste of campus life, I offer a simple tip: Connect with your teachers outside of the classroom. Research indicates that students who do that are more likely to graduate, are more likely to exhibit higher levels of achievement and are generally more satisfied with college. Many universities have responded to this research by sending faculty out of the classrooms and into the students' environment - the dormitory.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1996
Tapping on the keys of a Macintosh computer at Stevens Forest Elementary School in east Columbia, fifth-grader Allison Bohac types the names of 16 animals endangered in Maryland, including the peregrine falcon and the hawksbill turtle.The environmentally aware 10-year-old is a member of the school's chapter of the Windstar Foundation, the only student chapter of the international environmental group, said Ellen Gallagher, a Windstar coordinator in New Haven, Conn.Established by singer John Denver and his friend Tom Crum in Snowmass, Colo.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | January 22, 2006
Mike Walters, 17, hopes to follow in his father's footsteps and become a firefighter. Mike Palmer, 16, who also comes from a family with firefighting roots, said learning life-saving techniques gives him such an adrenaline rush that he can't think of anything else he'd rather do. Both have been members of their local volunteer fire companies since they were 12 and are among 14 students in a class that is teaching them the skills they'll need to become...
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
Laurel Woods Elementary School and NationsBank have formed an educational partnership to help students learn about banking, money and how to think like consumers.In the partnership, NationsBank employees will teach third-graders in the six-week Super Savers program.Bank employees also will help students run their own bank, allowing pupils to make regular deposits in their savings accounts.Pub Date: 5/03/96
NEWS
By Bonita Formwalt and Bonita Formwalt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 4, 1995
RESPECT -- FOR ONE another and for oneself -- was the keynote when Glen Burnie High School students gathered for an overnight workshop last weekend in the school's cafeteria.Participating students from several school organizations initially spent time making friends, building trust and improving leadership techniques. Later they met in small and large groups to address goals for the school year.The lock-in was the idea of senior Mary Wijangco, president of the Student Government Association, the sponsoring group.
NEWS
July 2, 1993
At least two lessons can be learned about Howard County based on test results from the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program, lessons that can be helpful to other jurisdictions.The first is that the county appears to retain its position as having one of the best school systems in the state. Although officials are still working on a way of ranking school systems based on the tests, there is other evidence of the county's success. More than half of the students in third, fifth and eighth grades scored in the top three levels of math, social studies and science.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Vernissia Tam gulped down half a glass of champagne at noon Friday and prepared to scream. She was about to find out what kind of doctor she would become, and where she would train. "No peeking," a Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine official told the Class of 2013. "The diplomas aren't printed yet. " After a countdown from 10 that took all of three seconds, Tam and her classmates broke the seals on letters revealing their fates, jumping into one another's arms for an embrace and congratulations.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
When you enter Julie Chang's world languages class at Waverly Elementary School in Ellicott City, you leave English at the door. Then, if you know the answer to a question and are told to " qing ju shou ," you raise your hand. If you're told, " bu shou hua ," then you must keep quiet. And if someone asks about the weather and it's sunny outside, you say, " yin tian . " Chang teaches Chinese, one of two languages offered in the Howard County school system's world languages pilot, which is in its second year at Laurel Woods and Waverly elementary schools.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2012
In one Baltimore County school next semester, students will swap notebooks for 1-inch touch screens, textbook passages for online articles, worksheets for apps, and writing utensils for a keyboard, launching the first "paperless classroom" in a county school. The program is a pilot with 70 middle-school students enrolled at the Loch Raven Technical Academy's law and finance magnet program, a distinctive program that teachers say requires students to navigate digital platforms to keep up with the fast-paced fields of study.
NEWS
By Mike McGrew | September 4, 2012
One dreary spring morning, I entered Robert Moton Elementary as opera resounded through its halls, stirring my soul like never before. As a school psychologist with limited exposure to classical genres, I was startled but tremendously invigorated by this music. I then noticed some students bopping down the halls — also seemingly uplifted. I immediately sought out the assistant principal, a former music teacher who selects Moton's morning melodies, begging him to identify this inspiring music.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Many of Maryland's high school leaders, a collection of student-athletes from high schools across the state, came to Reservoir High on Tuesday to learn about leadership, ride tricycles and get traffic tickets. Some explanation is probably called for. Tuesday was the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association's third annual Student-Athlete Leadership Conference, where students from 134 schools learned about topics ranging from being a captain to nutrition to making smart decisions.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
When a group of Betsy Adelman's students at Ellicott Mills Middle School learned that a low-pressure air zone created by wind turbines could kill endangered bats by causing their lungs to burst, they set about making a 41/2 -minute documentary instead of writing an essay. Titled"Gone with the Wind,"it was shown during a nonjuried screening of environmental films by the American Film Institute at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center in Silver Spring. Now it will get a second look as a tool for teaching teachers.
NEWS
May 30, 2006
Maryland students have finished newly required high school assessment tests, and some teachers and school districts wonder if there are so many mandated core courses that electives are being overshadowed and even neglected. It's a good question. With high school graduation at stake, schools obviously need to do what's necessary to help students pass the mandatory tests. But with the current focus on accountability, there is a danger of putting too much emphasis on tests and test results.
NEWS
June 3, 1997
WHAT WOULD BECOME of the Cedar Lane School's children if the school ceased to exist? We hope that we'll never have to answer that question, and the Harper's Choice facility always will be around to serve Howard County students with some of the most severe developmental and physical disabilities.Each of the 80 students poses a different challenge for the Cedar Lane staff. Some need help expressing basic thoughts, some rely on feeding tubes, some are autistic, others have behavioral problems.
NEWS
May 17, 2012
Baltimore County schools spokesman Charles Herndon told The Sun there is no empirical evidence that class size is linked to student achievement ("Smaller Balto. Co. class sizes urged," May 150). But if that's true, then why did officials limit class sizes at the lowest-performing high schools, where smaller classes were deemed important for struggling students? The answer is that they, like everyone else other than maybe Mr. Herndon, recognize the simple truth that bigger classes make it harder for students to learn.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
The stethoscope may be an icon of the medical profession to most patients. But it's more of a relic to many doctors. The device used to listen to the heart, lungs and other body parts — invented nearly 200 years ago — has been overtaken by newer, more sophisticated imaging equipment and other changes in healthcare. And some adherents to the old ways say a significant number of physicians who wear a stethoscope around their necks no longer know how to use it properly. Some medical schools including Johns Hopkins, however, are bringing back the lost art of cardiac auscultation, or listening, as a means to sharpen their students' diagnostic skills and cut costs from excessive high-tech imaging.
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