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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
Students and faculty at a Northeast Baltimore high school will be offered blood tests to detect exposure to lead after dust containing the metal was detected in parts of the building, school officials said yesterday.Evidence of lead dust was confirmed last month at Fairmount-Harford High School in the 2500 block of Harford Road, a school in the midst of renovations, said Catherine Foster, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore City Public Schools. The faculty was informed Nov. 7, and students and parents were notified in a letter sent yesterday.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Baltimore International College is set to hand over control of its operations to Virginia's Stratford University after restructuring its debt and receiving approval from the required accrediting agencies. The downtown culinary college held its final graduation Dec. 10 and will officially become a branch of Stratford on Jan. 1. Baltimore International students will be able to continue their classes at Stratford in January, and the branch will begin admitting new students in February.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
As he lay dying of stab wounds early Saturday, 20-year-old Johns Hopkins University student Christopher Elser told a fraternity brother, "I tried, I fought." "His death was as a hero," Brian Kinsella told more than a thousand mourners who gathered yesterday on Hopkins' Homewood campus to remember Elser, a junior from Camden, S.C. "He didn't give up. He was one of the toughest kids I knew," said Kinsella, a sophomore member of Elser's Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Elser was stabbed by an intruder at the fraternity's off-campus Charles Village apartment house just before 6 a.m., two hours after a party ended with a door left unlocked.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
Remembering his nephew as a gregarious and entrepreneurial student who "was going to be somebody," Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said Monday that his killing should prompt university officials everywhere to reassess off-campus security. Christopher Cummings, who had just completed his junior year at Old Dominion University and had decided to study law, was shot to death Friday in the house where he lived with other students near the Norfolk, Va., campus. He was 20. Police have not identified a suspect or a motive for the killing.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2004
Students at Century High School in Carroll County yesterday packed the main lobby, media center and nurse's office for help from a crisis support team as they struggled to comprehend the death of a popular junior who died Wednesday night in a car accident. Gretchen Martina Brandt, 16, of Woodbine was killed when her car crossed the center line into eastbound Liberty Road and was struck by a sport utility vehicle, state police said yesterday. Crisis counselors were at three Sykesville schools yesterday to help students and faculty deal with the loss.
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, m.d. and T. Berry Brazelton, m.d.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | January 21, 2001
T. Berry Brazelton received many letters after writing a column about misbehaving children in the classroom. Here is a sampling: Guilderland, N.Y.: Please reconsider your response to the parent who was concerned because her child's entire class was being punished for the misbehavior of a few students. I believe such punitive "discipline" will only further alienate and frustrate the students who don't follow the rules. Furthermore, such a policy will undermine the relationship between students and faculty, creating an "us against them" mentality.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON | October 18, 2006
Two Anne Arundel County students have been charged with disrupting school activities and making false statements in connection with a series of bomb threats that were called in to their high school this month, county police said yesterday. The suspects, whose names were not released because they are juveniles, are accused of making threatening phone calls Oct. 5 to Northeast High School, at 1121 Duvall Highway in Pasadena. The threats forced an immediate evacuation of the school. Anne Arundel County police and fire departments and the state fire marshal's office responded to the scene and after a search of the school, students and faculty were allowed to return.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF Contributing writer Ruth Gidley in Guatemala City provided information for this article | April 15, 1998
A group of students and faculty members from St. Mary's College was back in Guatemala yesterday, preparing to give accounts to authorities there of the day in January when they were attacked by bandits.The 10 anthropology students and three faculty members -- part of a group robbed and raped by highway gunmen while on a study tour -- were expected to speak today to a judge who will decide whether to charge suspects in the crime. Later this week they're expected to view a police lineup.They are traveling in Guatemala under the protection of its national police, according to police sources there.
NEWS
By Bonnie Wilson | August 30, 2001
PERHAPS no single group receives more advice than first-year college students. As the incoming class of 2005 prepares for its first taste of campus life, I offer a simple tip: Connect with your teachers outside of the classroom. Research indicates that students who do that are more likely to graduate, are more likely to exhibit higher levels of achievement and are generally more satisfied with college. Many universities have responded to this research by sending faculty out of the classrooms and into the students' environment - the dormitory.
NEWS
August 16, 1994
A $7.3 million renovation project at Western Maryland College will completely change the school's academic buildings by the end of the school year, college officials said.The major restorations will occur in Memorial Hall, the fine arts building, Alumni Hall and Levine Hall. Other minor changes and improvements will be made to the college's art studio, and some faculty offices will be relocated to other buildings on campus."It'll be interesting for new students," Ethan Seidel, vice president for administration and finance.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
The Facebook page of Towson University President Robert Caret lists a line from Pat Conroy as his favorite quotation: "Why do they not teach you that time is a finger snap and an eye blink, and that you should not allow a moment to pass you by without taking joyous, ecstatic note of it, not wasting a moment of its swift, breakneck circuit?" In six years at Towson, Caret has not wasted a second. The university's recent skirmish with neighbors in Rodgers Forge, over the location of a new 5,000-seat arena, is an example of both Caret's urgency and his diplomacy.
NEWS
By Mark S. Langevin | December 8, 2008
I proudly teach government and politics at University of Maryland University College (UMUC) and often discuss the notorious 1898 Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court case with my students. Plessy cemented the post-Reconstruction Jim Crow foundation by endorsing the racist doctrine of "separate but equal." In some ways, UMUC is similar to the East Louisiana Railroad car that Homer Plessy boarded on June 7, 1892. Just as railroads served to propel the U.S. toward progress in the 19th century, UMUC plays a key role in creating a future of global opportunities for thousands of adult students in Maryland and throughout the world, offering bachelor's and master's programs, a doctoral program and a multitude of certificate programs and numerous online offerings.
NEWS
By Emily Groves and Emily Groves,sun reporter | April 9, 2008
The Hammond High School cafeteria is packed with students. In one corner, a mix of Irish, Israeli and Ethiopian music can be heard while students cheer those competing in a chopstick pick-up competition. This was not a scene from a lunch period; this was Culture Fest, a showcase of the diverse international population at the Columbia school. More than 30 students last week presented informational poster boards, traditional clothing, food, toys, games and currency from 29 countries native to them or their parents.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | December 23, 2007
William R. Brody says he would like to teach undergraduates at the Johns Hopkins University, where he has been president since 1996, but it is a little difficult to carve out time for thrice-weekly lectures for an entire semester. So Brody came up with the idea of teaching a course in the intersession, the monthlong term in January, between semesters, when a variety of courses, many off the beaten academic track, are offered. The course is called "Uncommon Sense: A Practical Approach to Problem Solving for your Personal and Professional Life."
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | May 14, 2007
In the Great Hall of St. John's College, the graduates-to-be, some in patent leather heels and pearls, others in flip-flops and sunglasses, waited in a rigid alphabetical line with name cards on the floor dictating where to stand. Faculty members prodded students with reminders of how to walk, which way to turn and the precise route to take across the lawn to their seats. The tightly choreographed procession appeared to be as uncomfortable for this group as their hot, itchy polyester robes.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance and Gadi Dechter and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTERS | April 19, 2007
Even with early warning signs and multiple campus interventions - as in the case of Virginia Tech gunman Cho Seung-Hui - a university's options for dealing with mentally ill students are limited by privacy laws and medical ethics. Despite two encounters with campus police in 2005 after harassment complaints by female students, and a brief commitment at a psychiatric hospital because of fears that he was suicidal, Cho remained a Hokie in good standing even as he plotted the massacre of 32 students and faculty Monday in Blacksburg, Va., authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Thirty months ago, the state named St. Mary's College a "public honors college."Yesterday, college officials canceled classes to figure out what that means. The experts at hand: the school's 1,500 students."It's only fitting, as students, that we are given this opportunity, as the changes that will take place will affect us most," senior Alex Kovalski, a student who helped to arrange the event, told several hundred students, professors and administrators who assembled yesterday morning on a residential quadrangle on campus.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | November 5, 2006
The numbers were reason enough to protest 14 years ago. Then, the Johns Hopkins University had a black student population that made up 4.5 percent of its undergraduate body. And the 330-member undergraduate faculty included just two blacks, according to newspaper articles. Members of the Black Student Union protested this, among other things, confronting university officials, holding a sit-in at the library and engaging in heated confrontations with other students when a controversial speaker came to campus.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON | October 18, 2006
Two Anne Arundel County students have been charged with disrupting school activities and making false statements in connection with a series of bomb threats that were called in to their high school this month, county police said yesterday. The suspects, whose names were not released because they are juveniles, are accused of making threatening phone calls Oct. 5 to Northeast High School, at 1121 Duvall Highway in Pasadena. The threats forced an immediate evacuation of the school. Anne Arundel County police and fire departments and the state fire marshal's office responded to the scene and after a search of the school, students and faculty were allowed to return.
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