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By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | December 15, 1991
Santa's workshop was never like this.Imagine a dozen elves gift-wrapping exactly the presents children asked for and including the batteries.That was the scene Tuesday as students prepared for the third annual Christmas party sponsored by Havre de Grace High School's SMILES program, which places student volunteers in the community.SMILES -- Service Makes Individual Lives Extra Special -- welcomed 30 children to the school Saturday for a holiday meal and a chance to choose presents for family members and themselves.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
He moved to Baltimore to take a job as a property manager, but when the company he worked for collapsed, Ganesh Boodram said, he found himself living in the streets. Homelessness was cruel to the Boston native. He was hit by a car, shattering a shoulder. Despite his skills as a handyman, few would hire him. He rarely got to see his grown daughters. Things got so bad not long ago, he said, he decided to take his own life. Then he walked into a small health center in Southwest Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1998
They danced to the musical stylings of the 19-piece Mr. Dance orchestra. Graceful couples twirled, dipped and sashayed to the sounds of their youth -- Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra, Benny Goodman -- the men in classic tailored suits, the women in chiffon, silk and satin.And when it was time to choose the king and queen of the prom yesterday, there wasn't really any competition. Bill and Betty Byrne, who effortlessly glided around the Boumi Temple dance floor all afternoon, were the obvious choice for the honors at the Senior Citizens Prom, sponsored by Loyola College.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 15, 2013
Baltimore's harbor may be too funky for swimming or fishing, but maybe a little gardening can help. Students from two city schools and some adult volunteers gathered at the National Aquarium Tuesday to "plant" some oysters in the Inner Harbor - not for eating but to try to improve the health of the ailing water body. "This is the first time anyone has tried planting this number of oysters in the Inner Harbor," said Adam Lindquist, coordinator of the Healthy Harbor campaign, an ambitious initiative aimed at making the Northwest and Middle branches of the Patapsco River swimmable and fishable by 2020.
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 10, 1996
For Susan Milstein, it has become the perfect way to merge her skills as a certified public accountant with her desire to give something back to the community.After four years, Western Maryland College's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program has produced a cadre of trained student volunteers who have become indispensable to those who can't afford professional help in preparing their taxes.The idea came to Ms. Milstein, a Western Maryland professor and the VITA program internship adviser, a few years ago while she was taking a sabbatical leave from her teaching job.After a little research, Ms. Milstein found that the Internal Revenue Service had a program to help taxpayers who were older, disadvantaged, handicapped or non-English-speaking.
NEWS
February 25, 2007
McDaniel College will offer tax preparation assistance to those in need through the Internal Revenue Service's program, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA). VITA has this year been chosen by the IRS to be a test site for electronic filing. Students will work directly through the IRS Web site to submit state and federal tax forms. McDaniel students, alumni and staff volunteer to help Susan Milstein, business professor and program leader, in the computer lab in the basement of Lewis Hall.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2000
Joe Owens' Chevrolet 4-by-4 pickup truck hadn't been parked in front of Western Maryland College's Rouzer Hall for more than a few seconds yesterday morning when the swarm descended. Students - about a dozen of them - grabbed the computer, duffel bags, milk crates of sneakers, a squirt gun and a full-sized ironing board belonging to his son, Eric, and hauled everything up 32 steps to Eric's new home, Room 412. In less than five minutes, Eric's belongings were all piled in the hallway outside his one-car-garage-size room, waiting for the 18-year-old to return with the key. Owens didn't need to lift a thing to help his son, a freshman, move in. He just sat in the driver's seat and marveled at the scene.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 24, 2003
AS YOU may have noticed, we have entered the Golden Age of public kissing in this country. Every time you turn on the TV or pick up a newspaper, someone's planting a wet one on someone else. Politicians are smooching with their wives in record numbers -- during the California recall campaign, toothy actor Arnold Schwarzenegger seemed to be mashing his face into that of his wife, the perpetually gaunt Maria Shriver, every five minutes. And entertainers are doing way more than just air-kissing these days, as Madonna and Britney Spears demonstrated with their eyebrow-raising lip-lock on the MTV Video Music Awards.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
A radio-thon at Cranberry Mall on Friday to raise money and recruit members for a club run by and for teens will feature a celebrity disc jockey and a prize of four concert tickets to Merriweather Post Pavilion.So far, the parents and students behind the effort to open a club have been calling themselves C. C. PRIDES. Students will have a chance to submit an idea for a club name at the radio-thon booth, where disc jockey Captain Connors of WYCR in Hanover, Pa., will host from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.Meanwhile, about 15 students will be sitting at telephones at Random House, which has offered the use of an office as phone-in headquarters for the night.
FEATURES
October 9, 1990
CURRENT volunteers' news and needs:''Healing a River for the Life of the Chesapeake'' is a volunteeproject for Maryland's Community Service Day on Saturday, Oct. 13, when some 6,000 volunteers in counties from Garrett to St. Mary's will clean up areas around the Potomac River. If you or your group want to help, the contacts for the counties are: Allegany, Darrell Spence, 1-777-5655; Carroll, Melinda Byrd, 1-795-6043; Charles, Kathy Parkin 1-645-0610; Frederick, Linda Norris, 1-694-2590; Garrett, John Nelson, 1-224-1920; Montgomery, Jayne Hench, 1-495-2509; Prince George's, Carolyn Watson, 925-5850; St. Mary's, Marianne Chapman, 1-373-2022; and Washington, Gordon Gay, 1-739-4200.
EXPLORE
By Brianna Patterson | December 23, 2011
Rupini Shukla is a natural born altruist, dedicated to helping young people in her community become better students. "It's a feeling of satisfaction; it makes me really happy that I volunteer," said Shukla, a senior at Oakland Mills High School. "I've lost track of how many hours I've done because it's not something you think of when you're really doing it from the heart. " Once a week, the 17-year-old can be found at the Howard County Library's East Columbia branch tutoring middle school students in math and science through the Teen Time after-school program.
NEWS
February 25, 2007
McDaniel College will offer tax preparation assistance to those in need through the Internal Revenue Service's program, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA). VITA has this year been chosen by the IRS to be a test site for electronic filing. Students will work directly through the IRS Web site to submit state and federal tax forms. McDaniel students, alumni and staff volunteer to help Susan Milstein, business professor and program leader, in the computer lab in the basement of Lewis Hall.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2003
Balancing a dessert tray while she walked among packed tables, Caroline Gould stopped at each one to offer an assortment of cakes, pies, cookies, doughnuts and pastries to homeless men, women and children seated in the Beans and Bread Outreach Center in Baltimore's Fells Point. "One man asked for a cinnamon bun," Gould said after her 2 1/2 -hour shift. "I didn't have any and told him I was sorry." But she later found one of the pastries in the kitchen, and delivered it to his table. "He was happy when I brought it out."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 24, 2003
AS YOU may have noticed, we have entered the Golden Age of public kissing in this country. Every time you turn on the TV or pick up a newspaper, someone's planting a wet one on someone else. Politicians are smooching with their wives in record numbers -- during the California recall campaign, toothy actor Arnold Schwarzenegger seemed to be mashing his face into that of his wife, the perpetually gaunt Maria Shriver, every five minutes. And entertainers are doing way more than just air-kissing these days, as Madonna and Britney Spears demonstrated with their eyebrow-raising lip-lock on the MTV Video Music Awards.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
When La'Keshia Stuckey was 7, she helped her grandmother do office work in City Hall and went door to door during campaign season. Now 15, Stuckey, like hundreds of young volunteers in city political campaigns, is continuing what she was raised to do. "It's fun campaigning because we get to go to different places and meet different people," she said, as she went door to door wearing a Martin O'Malley shirt in East Baltimore. The sight of teen-agers on the campaign trail is as much a tradition around town as signs, bumper stickers and fund-raisers, says Matthew A. Crenson, a political science professor at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Cathi Higgins and Cathi Higgins,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2001
Anyone who thinks all teen-agers are lazy, uncommitted and self-absorbed should spend some time with members of the InterAct Club, a group of about 50 students at Hammond High School who keep busy helping others. Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Columbia-Patuxent, InterAct is a community service organization for young people between ages 14 and 18. Under the supervision of Hammond guidance counselor Samina Chaudhry, the club meets once a week to decide who needs its help. Sometimes the club is asked to assist an organization, but mostly the volunteers initiate, plan and execute community service projects on their own. Rotary sponsor Jerry Richman says he occasionally "throws out ideas, not in a pushy way, but to germinate a seed when suggesting activities.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Board of Education should not be afraid of appearing a little prudish as it fine-tunes a policy against dating between students and school employees.The teachers' union wants some exceptions to the blanket prohibition described in the draft, but the board should beware of diluting the central principle behind this policy: The relationship between employees and students of all ages should be educational.The draft is modeled on Carroll County's new anti-dating policy, which bans dating or sexual interaction between school employees and students, including those in adult education programs, regardless of age. As written, the Anne Arundel policy would apply to volunteers as well.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2000
Joe Owens' Chevrolet 4-by-4 pickup truck hadn't been parked in front of Western Maryland College's Rouzer Hall for more than a few seconds yesterday morning when the swarm descended. Students - about a dozen of them - grabbed the computer, duffel bags, milk crates of sneakers, a squirt gun and a full-sized ironing board belonging to his son, Eric, and hauled everything up 32 steps to Eric's new home, Room 412. In less than five minutes, Eric's belongings were all piled in the hallway outside his one-car-garage-size room, waiting for the 18-year-old to return with the key. Owens didn't need to lift a thing to help his son, a freshman, move in. He just sat in the driver's seat and marveled at the scene.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
It was the only commencement address he ever gave.Standing on the manicured lawns of Washington College on May 24, John F. Kennedy Jr. echoed his father and told graduates they had an obligation to serve their communities. His visit entranced Chestertown, sending residents clamoring for tickets to the graduation.Kennedy flew to the commencement appearance, traveling in his plane from New Jersey to New Castle, Del., with his flight instructor, Washington College President John S. Toll said yesterday.
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