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By CINDY PARR | April 4, 1994
It wasn't too long ago that the State Board of Education mandated that students would perform a certain number of hours geared toward community service as part of their graduation requirements.At first, the concept met with a great deal of controversy, but eventually it was accepted.Now students, beginning with the current class of high school freshmen, must fulfill their "student service graduation requirement" to receive a high school diploma."Students are required to perform 75 hours of community service before graduation, and they can start as early as sixth grade," said Clyde Sterner, a guidance counselor at East Middle School in Westminster.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
When Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance announced plans this fall to create a school safety office in the aftermath of several gun incidents, some in the community assumed he would pick someone with a badge to lead the new department. Instead of choosing a police officer, Dance last month named a 36-year veteran of the system who has worked with high-risk students and led efforts to respond to emergencies in schools. Safety is something Dale Rauenzahn already handled in his previous post as the schools' executive director of student-support services — along with health, counseling, athletic and social work offices.
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NEWS
January 26, 1993
When the state Board of Education considered new graduation requirements last year, the hearings drew 143 speakers and 693 written comments. People talked about home economics courses, about algebra and geometry, about health education. But most of all, they talked about a proposal that all students be required to complete 75 hours of public service before they can get a high school diploma. After listening to the debate and after surveying local school districts about how much it would cost to implement, the board approved the 75-hour requirement as part of new graduation standards which take effect with students who enter ninth grade next fall.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Cyberbullying became a problem for tech-savvy students well before adults — particularly parents and teachers — knew much about it. For the past decade, that's where Sameer Hinduja has come in. Hinduja is the co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center at Florida Atlantic University's School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. On Thursday, he visited Howard County for two anti-bullying seminars hosted by the school district and its council of PTAs. As part of the county schools' professional development day, Hinduja conducted a presentation for student service personnel, including counselors and psychologists, Howard school officials said.
NEWS
January 24, 1994
The Carroll County public school administration has announced these opportunities for students to fulfill the public service requirement for graduation:* Therapeutic Recreation Council: Various jobs are available for horseback-riding sessions.Students must be comfortable with horses and interested in working with children and adults with disabilities. Call 848-4611.Students are needed as scorekeepers for duckpin or tenpin bowling. Students interested in working with adult bowlers must be in high school.
NEWS
January 27, 1993
The State Department of Education didn't do a masterful job selling the student service requirement for graduation to the public.It didn't sense that opposition to the program, which will require students to help their schools and community, would fester for a year. It seemed caught off-guard when a few legislators vowed to kill the program -- a threat that continues with a Senate committee hearing this afternoon.The state also got off on the wrong foot by packaging the plan as a way to encourage volunteerism.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | January 4, 1994
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world."Margaret Mead's words are symbolic of the efforts of the educators and officials from community service organizations who are working to develop student service learning programs and opportunities for middle school and high school students in Howard County.Beginning with the 1997 high school graduating class, students are mandated by Maryland law to serve 75 hours of community service as a requisite for graduation.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | October 30, 1991
A controversial proposal to make community service a graduation requirement in Maryland took center stage yesterday the State Board of Education began an extraordinary two-day hearing on plans to raise high school graduation requirements.Most local school districts as well as the statewide student organization and teachers organizations have lined up against the proposal to have students perform 75 hours of service to graduate. But yesterday at the state board's headquarters in Baltimore, individual students, teachers and parents spoke for it."
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | July 30, 1992
Some Baltimore area school officials reacted with an air of resignation yesterday to a pioneering new rule making community service a condition of obtaining a high school diploma."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | February 12, 1993
Almost all students will fulfill the new student service graduation requirement in middle school, according to a plan the Howard County Board of Education approved yesterday.The requirement can be completed either in a program developed by a student's school or in a community service program.The board gave its approval although there are no details as to how students will fulfill the requirement. A curriculum advisory committee will meet to address that matter.Board members praised the idea of giving students the chance to finish the requirement at the middle school level.
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | September 13, 2011
Towson University last week celebrated the opening of 734,000 square feet of housing, gathering and parking space in its West Village project. The latest facilities to open in the West Village include two additional residence halls, Douglass House and Barton House, as well as a commons building and a 1,500-parking-space garage. The combined cost of the new structures in the West Village is $106 million, and the three buildings are LEED Silver certified. A Sept. 7 ceremony included tours of West Village Commons and Douglass House, as well as the campus' Student Involvement Fair, showcasing student organizations on campus.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
Principal Rhonda Richetta can vividly recall days when students have come to her office door at City Springs School gasping for air. The school has a large population of asthmatic elementary- and middle-school-age students who receive critical services — including daily breathing treatments — from a nurse practitioner in its health center. Richetta fears that could change next year if the school is one of six that are slated to reduce their health care services because of proposed funding cuts from the city.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 1, 2009
Malcolm Graham Vinzant Jr., a founding faculty member of what is now the Community College of Baltimore County at Catonsville and who later rehabilitated houses and owned a popular Cross Street Market cheese stall, died Thursday from complications of a stroke at a Winter Park, Fla., assisted-living facility. The Federal Hill resident was 78. Mr. Vinzant, the son of a federal government worker and a homemaker, was born in Laredo, Texas, and moved to Catonsville shortly after his birth.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | March 28, 2007
Offering a range of items from turkey sandwiches to advice on future careers, the new student services building at Howard Community College started living up to its promise as a "one-stop shop" this week. As officials cut the ribbon on the $24.6 million building -- funded equally by state and county money -- it was buzzing with students getting meals or coffee in the spacious Cafe on the Quad, shopping in the bookstore and asking questions at the new offices for admissions, registration, financial aid, finance and academic support.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
With the strains of the anthems of the Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and Air Force filling the room, hundreds of students and faculty members at Winters Mill High rose to their feet and offered a steady stream of grateful applause to the nearly 300 war veterans who had gathered for a day of remembrance. Among them stood men and women who had served in conflicts stretching back to World War II. There was 92-year-old Henry Singer, who served in the Navy from 1934 to 1945. Standing beside him was his friend, fellow Navy man Charles Swiderman, 85, who clutched a framed painting of the USS Santee, the carrier on which he served from 1942 to 1945.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2005
Howard Community College is close to securing the funds it needs to build a $24.6 million Student Services Building. The project is slated to receive $12.3 million from the state in the proposed fiscal 2006 capital budget unveiled last week by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. HCC has asked the county to match those funds. Student services are now scattered throughout the campus, with most housed on the first floor of the library building. The new building would have all the services - such as the bookstore, student dining and financial aid - under one roof.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
At least one of this year's freshmen is not at all worried about fulfilling her 75 hours of required student service.Francis Scott Key High ninth-grader Laura Kovacs of Taneytown completed 75 hours as a student helper while she was still in middle school.But not all students are in such a position, and for them, Carroll school officials are putting together a directory of agencies, clubs and other volunteer organizations that need help and can give the students opportunities to complete their state-mandated service requirements.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2003
Clarification The $650,000 spent by the University of Maryland, College Park on a two-year marketing campaign in 2001 and 2002 came from privately raised funds, not from tuition revenue, as I implied in Wednesday's column. IT WAS pure coincidence, of course, that the University of Maryland Board of Regents repaired to Frostburg State University, far from the state's media centers and the madding crowd at College Park, to approve the latest round of tuition increases. And the scary part is that this may not be the end of it. Indeed, 30 percent over two years may be just the beginning.
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