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By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Sun national staff | November 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Caught in the conflicting currents of its past rulings on free speech, the Supreme Court groped uncertainly yesterday to find a way to rule on a major new dispute over university students' rights.At issue is a claim by University of Wisconsin students that the First Amendment protects them from having to subsidize, through mandatory activity fees, student organizations whose views they oppose.At the end of a one-hour hearing yesterday, the justices appeared to be no nearer to agreeing on a response to that claim.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Glenelg Country School junior Tala Ahmadi visited Spain with family last year while that county's national soccer team played in the FIFA World Cup championship — and to the surprise of many locals, she could hold a conversation about the team with its most ardent fans. "They were like, 'Oh, these Americans do not just know football and drink beer. They actually know something about soccer,'" said Ahmadi, 16, an avid soccer player who knows perhaps more than most Americans about the sport's ability to unite people of different racial and cultural backgrounds.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | October 10, 1990
A committee that has spent a year studying fund raising by PTAs, student organizations and booster clubs in county public schools is close to recommending rules that would limit, but not eliminate, the activities.The study was prompted by two concerns that came to public attention in 1989.School officials worried that fund raising was taking up too much class time, and PTA council officers were concerned that individual school PTAs were being asked to raise money for items that the school system should have supplied, such as paper, books and art supplies.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
The Johns Hopkins University student who killed an apparent intruder with a samurai sword got people talking. But what about the liquor store cashier who chased down a shoplifter, only to be threatened in an alley behind the Charles Village Pub on St. Paul Street? Or the burglar who broke into a graduate student's Calvert Street apartment and stole her backpack while she slept? Or the man who pushed open an unlocked second-story sliding-glass patio door and startled the female occupant of Hopkins House on West University Parkway when he shined a flashlight into her eyes?
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 4, 1994
CHICAGO -- Minority students are more likely than whites to study with, dine with and date students from different racial and ethnic groups, according to a nationwide study to be released tomorrow.However, students of color are much more likely than whites to feel excluded from school activities because of their racial or ethnic identity. And they are more likely to report racially based insults or threats made by faculty or fellow students, according to the study conducted by researchers from the Universities of Michigan and Arizona.
NEWS
By SHELBY PRUCHA-MITCHELL AND CHRIS MERL and SHELBY PRUCHA-MITCHELL AND CHRIS MERL,SUN REPORTERS | March 24, 2006
While the younger generation is typically stereotyped as being politically unaware, some student organizations at county high schools would suggest otherwise. "Our school is very diverse, and with a school like that it needs to be politically aware," said Allyson Gulihur, a senior at Long Reach High School who, like her peers, will have the opportunity to vote in a general election for the first time this fall. Gulihur is the vice president of Long Reach's Gay/Straight Alliance. "Students seem to be becoming more politically savvy and politically active," said Dominic Cross, a senior and student body president at Oakland Mills High.
NEWS
By Robert H. Deluty | September 5, 2003
DEAR STUDENTS: Like many of you, I am a member of the first generation in my family to go to college. As a result of the Nazi invasion of Poland and the subsequent Holocaust, my father lost his parents and sister and was deprived of even a high school education. My mother, who at 14 fled with her parents from Austria, was a splendid student even though she didn't know a word of English before arriving in America. All set to enroll in college, her plans were permanently derailed by the death of her father shortly after her high school graduation and by the need for her to find a job to support her mother.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | October 16, 1990
Paul still breaks into tears when he thinks about how close he came to dying before finally breaking free of 19 years of drug addiction and crime.The 38-year-old Anne Arundel Community College student took the first steps toward recovery when he enrolled at the college two years ago, to prepare for a career in veterinary medicine.And thanks to the efforts of an English teacher at AACC, Paul can take advantage of a support network geared to help him make it through the days at school -- a network he has found so helpful that Paul now volunteers to help others with similar problems.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
The Johns Hopkins University student who killed an apparent intruder with a samurai sword got people talking. But what about the liquor store cashier who chased down a shoplifter, only to be threatened in an alley behind the Charles Village Pub on St. Paul Street? Or the burglar who broke into a graduate student's Calvert Street apartment and stole her backpack while she slept? Or the man who pushed open an unlocked second-story sliding-glass patio door and startled the female occupant of Hopkins House on West University Parkway when he shined a flashlight into her eyes?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Glenelg Country School junior Tala Ahmadi visited Spain with family last year while that county's national soccer team played in the FIFA World Cup championship — and to the surprise of many locals, she could hold a conversation about the team with its most ardent fans. "They were like, 'Oh, these Americans do not just know football and drink beer. They actually know something about soccer,'" said Ahmadi, 16, an avid soccer player who knows perhaps more than most Americans about the sport's ability to unite people of different racial and cultural backgrounds.
NEWS
By Lisa Tom and Lisa Tom,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
Adam Furman, a junior at Atholton High School, lives and breathes music. "I'm either playing, organizing or listening to something," he said. "That's pretty much my whole life right now." His passion extends beyond playing in a typical garage band. "I've been [organizing] a so-called Basement Fest since I was in eighth grade," he said. That fest has outgrown his basement. Last year, hundreds of people attended Furman's Basement Fest in the backyard of friend Sean Kincaid's house in Glenelg.
NEWS
By SHELBY PRUCHA-MITCHELL AND CHRIS MERL and SHELBY PRUCHA-MITCHELL AND CHRIS MERL,SUN REPORTERS | March 24, 2006
While the younger generation is typically stereotyped as being politically unaware, some student organizations at county high schools would suggest otherwise. "Our school is very diverse, and with a school like that it needs to be politically aware," said Allyson Gulihur, a senior at Long Reach High School who, like her peers, will have the opportunity to vote in a general election for the first time this fall. Gulihur is the vice president of Long Reach's Gay/Straight Alliance. "Students seem to be becoming more politically savvy and politically active," said Dominic Cross, a senior and student body president at Oakland Mills High.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
As an aspiring professional musician, Joel Gerlach knows that the road ahead will be a competitive one. But the senior at Patapsco High School and Center for the Arts will soon have a skill that could set him apart from others his age: He'll know how to play the organ. Patapsco, a Dundalk magnet school, recently spent more than $30,000 in donations and school funds to purchase an electronic organ. As soon as the instrument has been tuned to the acoustics of the auditorium, Gerlach will be among the students starting weekly lessons with a teacher.
NEWS
By Robert H. Deluty | September 5, 2003
DEAR STUDENTS: Like many of you, I am a member of the first generation in my family to go to college. As a result of the Nazi invasion of Poland and the subsequent Holocaust, my father lost his parents and sister and was deprived of even a high school education. My mother, who at 14 fled with her parents from Austria, was a splendid student even though she didn't know a word of English before arriving in America. All set to enroll in college, her plans were permanently derailed by the death of her father shortly after her high school graduation and by the need for her to find a job to support her mother.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Sun national staff | November 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Caught in the conflicting currents of its past rulings on free speech, the Supreme Court groped uncertainly yesterday to find a way to rule on a major new dispute over university students' rights.At issue is a claim by University of Wisconsin students that the First Amendment protects them from having to subsidize, through mandatory activity fees, student organizations whose views they oppose.At the end of a one-hour hearing yesterday, the justices appeared to be no nearer to agreeing on a response to that claim.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
A group of Goucher College students tried to take the campus back to the '50s yesterday, not to the innocent time of poodle skirts and Elvis hits, but to the dark side of the decade when racial segregation was common and legal.Students heading into lunch at Stimson Hall could take labels that designated them as "white" or "colored."The two groups were then directed to different silverware, different lunch lines, different tables."It was definitely an experience," said Will Vought, a senior.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
A group of Goucher College students tried to take the campus back to the '50s yesterday, not to the innocent time of poodle skirts and Elvis hits, but to the dark side of the decade when racial segregation was common and legal.Students heading into lunch at Stimson Hall could take labels that designated them as "white" or "colored."The two groups were then directed to different silverware, different lunch lines, different tables."It was definitely an experience," said Will Vought, a senior.
NEWS
By Lisa Tom and Lisa Tom,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
Adam Furman, a junior at Atholton High School, lives and breathes music. "I'm either playing, organizing or listening to something," he said. "That's pretty much my whole life right now." His passion extends beyond playing in a typical garage band. "I've been [organizing] a so-called Basement Fest since I was in eighth grade," he said. That fest has outgrown his basement. Last year, hundreds of people attended Furman's Basement Fest in the backyard of friend Sean Kincaid's house in Glenelg.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
For fifth-grader Jonathan Richard Lyon, the war-torn region of Bosnia-Herzegovina isn't just a spot on the National Geographic map in his room -- it's the former home of a Bosnian Serb family he is helping.The 10-year-old from east Columbia's Village of Kings Contrivance has organized a drive to collect furniture and other household items for Senad and Dzana Sadzak and their three children, refugees being resettled in Baltimore with help from Lutheran Social Services."I didn't know about Bosnia before," said Jonathan, a Stevens Forest Elementary School student whose work with the Sadzak family is part of his work with the school's program for gifted and talented students.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 4, 1994
CHICAGO -- Minority students are more likely than whites to study with, dine with and date students from different racial and ethnic groups, according to a nationwide study to be released tomorrow.However, students of color are much more likely than whites to feel excluded from school activities because of their racial or ethnic identity. And they are more likely to report racially based insults or threats made by faculty or fellow students, according to the study conducted by researchers from the Universities of Michigan and Arizona.
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