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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
WHEN Amy Ming Chiu won a housing lottery at the Johns Hopkins University last spring, she had her choice of hundreds of university-owned apartments to live in starting this fall.She ended up moving with three friends into a four-bedroom suite on the third floor of the Homewood Apartments at North Charles and 31st streets."It doesn't feel like a dorm," said the 19-year-old political science major."It's spacious. It has really big windows. It has a full-size kitchen, so we don't have to be on the meal plan.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1997
Towson University's dorms are bursting these days -- they're at 101 percent of capacity and 150 more students crowd a waiting list for rooms.With a "no vacancy" sign on campus, more students are turning to nearby apartments and houses, triggering complaints about parties, noise and trash from residential neighborhoods in the county and city.Some neighbors have kept a log of students' comings and goings to substantiate suspected zoning violations."It's become a tremendous burden," says Judith Giacomo, president of the Aigburth Manor Neighborhood Association, which has ousted three fraternity houses from the community in recent years.
BUSINESS
By Sarah Cohen and Sarah Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 3, 1996
Fast-food restaurants, auto dealers and bars touting beer specials fill the area adjacent to Maryland's biggest school. But the century-old neighborhoods in College Park remain remarkably aloof from the university town that most visitors see.On a recent autumn Saturday, the U.S. 1 corridor began jamming with cars at 10 a.m., early enough for University of Maryland football fans to begin the traditional pre-game tailgate parties.A few blocks away, in the Berwyn section, a troop of Brownies could skip across the street near a church, unaware of the football fuss.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
The financially troubled Queen Anne Belvedere apartments on Charles Street in Baltimore would become the University of Baltimore's first student housing complex under a proposal being considered by the city.The $6.3 million proposal, from a group called the Queen Anne Belvedere Revitalization Limited Partnership, is one of four submitted to the city by groups vying to buy and renovate the 69-unit apartment complex at 1202 to 1218 and 1301 N. Charles Street.Two other teams indicated that they also want to renovate the city-owned apartments to provide housing for university students and others, but they don't have the university's endorsement.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
The Johns Hopkins University will begin work this summer on a $17 million modernization of Homewood Apartments, a seven-story building at 3003 N. Charles St. that is home to 230 students.University trustees voted last month to move ahead with the development, the largest of five residential projects that Hopkins has launched in recent years to provide attractive student housing near its Homewood campus.Besides providing housing for students, the reconfigured building will have one floor of office space and "upscale retail space," at street level, according to Robert Schuerholz, director of facilities management for Hopkins.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
AFTER MODERNIZING four apartment buildings in Baltimore's Charles Village area over the past five years, the Johns Hopkins University is coming to the rescue of the largest one yet.The Homewood Apartments, a seven-story building at 3003 N. Charles St., is home to 230 students. But its plumbing and heating systems haven't been upgraded since it was built in the 1920s. It also needs energy-efficient windows and new elevators.Hopkins recently selected consultants to explore the feasibility of upgrading Homewood's apartments while preserving its handsome brick exterior, designed by Edward Glidden.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | August 22, 1995
Anticipating thousands of additional students by the turn of the century, Towson State University is poised for a major expansion, adding offices, housing and about 40 acres to the southeastern edge of its campus.The plans call for buying three facilities that would provide 220 housing units, 1,500 parking spaces and 200,000 square feet of office space -- about the size of the 23-story Redwood Tower in downtown Baltimore -- to the campus."It will raise our visibility and add to the economic vitality of Towson," said Hoke L. Smith, university president.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | December 8, 1993
A U.S. Supreme Court ruling Monday on Prince George's County's "mini-dormitory law" should not affect two Baltimore County ordinances that indirectly deal with off-campus student housing, said the sponsor of the measures.Councilman Douglas B. Riley, R-4th, said that the Baltimore County laws don't regulate based on who lives in the house, but on how the house is used.One of Mr. Riley's measures tries to control the noise often associated with off-campus college student housing; the other regulates the rooming houses that many students prefer to the more expensive and restrictive campus dormitories.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Prince George's County's attempt to regain the power to put strict controls on college students' off-campus housing failed in the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday.In a brief order, the court, without comment, turned aside an appeal by the county to revive a 1989 ordinance that would have forced students to obey special rules on the use of private homes near college campuses.Aimed primarily at the residential neighborhoods around the University of Maryland in College Park, the ordinance was based on the county's belief that "college students tend to create the type of disturbances that prevent a neighborhood from being a sanctuary."
NEWS
August 31, 1993
Student housing at Towson StateCouncilman Douglas B. Riley's proposed legislation to strengthen the ability of neighborhoods to halt disturbing behavior follows a more than two-year period of Towson State's working together with the community.University administrators and students have convened monthly with representatives from neighborhood associations, the police department, zoning offices and businesses to find fair ways to prevent student-caused problems. We have agreed that a few landlords have knowingly allowed more tenants than is permissible by the zoning code.
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