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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2010
Construction is set to begin this week on the next major project at the East Baltimore Development Inc. renewal area, a $60 million, 20-story housing tower for Johns Hopkins graduate students in the 900 block of N. Wolfe St. The tower's developer is Allen & O'Hara, a wholly owned subsidiary of Education Realty Trust, a publicly traded company based in Tennessee. The tower was designed by Marks, Thomas Architects of Baltimore to house 572 students in 321 units. The developer will also provide financing for the project.
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BUSINESS
December 15, 2009
Price names successor for fixed-income division Baltimore money manager T. Rowe Price Group said Monday that its global head of trading will take over for Mary J. Miller, director of the nearly $100 billion fixed-income division, who is stepping down Friday because she has been nominated for a Treasury Department job. Mike Gitlin, who has more than 16 years of experience with global capital markets, joined T. Rowe Price in 2007. Miller - nominated in October - needs U.S. Senate approval to become the Treasury Department's assistant secretary for financial markets.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | May 1, 2007
In the Towson area, where community leaders sometimes complain about unruly college students living in their neighborhoods, the university has come up with a place on campus to house a new influx of undergraduates. The first phase of Towson University's new West Village is made up of two dormitories with a total of 670 beds on university grounds. A groundbreaking ceremony for the project is scheduled for today. "We're happy to see they're adding housing," said Mike Ertel, president of the Greater Towson Council of Community Associations, an umbrella organization of neighborhood groups and homeowners associations.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | April 13, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Roll out of bed five minutes before that 8 a.m. class, but still get there on time. MTV, CNN and local phone service at no extra charge. Need to do some research for that term paper? The library is just steps away. For legions of college students, campus living is a wonderful mix of independence and convenience. A feeling of security, a sense of community and relatively low rent for an on-campus dormitory room are all incentives that students at the University of Maryland, College Park say keep them signing up for dorm space, even for their senior year.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | December 7, 2006
A Baltimore County man with muscular dystrophy was unable to enroll this year at Towson University because the campus failed to provide him with adequate wheelchair-accessible housing as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act, according to a lawsuit filed yesterday in federal District Court. Filed on behalf of Mark Kuchmas, 28, the suit alleges that virtually none of the 108 units at Towson's Millennium Hall apartments - a privately owned student residence hall on university land - meets the handicap-accessibility requirements of the federal Fair Housing Act. "What makes this case really odd, or surprising, is that the developer and owner are big, national organizations in the business of student housing," said Kuchmas' attorney, Andrew Levy of Baltimore.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2006
Mike Ertel says he expects tonight's meeting between Towson community leaders and Towson University's president to be cordial. But one of the topics up for discussion -- off-campus student housing -- has long been a source of town-and-gown tension. And the university is expected to grow significantly in the coming years. "I don't think there's the major animosity between residents and the university that some people perceive," said Ertel, the new president of the Greater Towson Council of Community Associations.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 22, 2005
When Goucher College moved from Baltimore to Towson more than 50 years ago, its first buildings were clad in a distinctive brown fieldstone quarried in Butler -- a way of providing visual unity for a fledgling campus. The same "Butler stone" can be found on the latest building to be completed at Goucher, a $19 million, 194-bed residence hall that opens this month. Goucher might have spent less for a building with cheaper materials, but it wouldn't have been as compatible with its surroundings or as durable, said college President Sanford J. Ungar.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2005
Towson University officials said yesterday that the school will not house students as part of a development planned for downtown Towson, pleasing residents who don't want a dormitory in the heart of the county seat. Alan Leberknight, interim vice president and chief financial officer of Towson University, said the decision to reject a bid by Heritage Properties and the Cordish Co. to build a 600-bed dormitory in Towson was based on how much debt the public university system would have had to carry and not on the community's opposition.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2005
Four state legislators have asked the state attorney general to look into Towson University's effort to find a site for off-campus student housing - a search some community members claim favors the developers of a controversial plan proposed for the center of Towson. A request for proposals issued by the school last month came after the Towson Circle III development - a Heritage Properties and Cordish Co. project that includes plans for a 600-bed dormitory - received preliminary approval from the county.
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