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BUSINESS
December 15, 2009
Star Development Group of Columbia broke ground Monday for Starview Plaza, a $33 million student housing project at 8700 Baltimore Ave. in College Park. When complete in August 2011, the project will contain 172 residences providing housing for 669 undergraduate students at the University of Maryland, College Park plus 351 parking spaces, 9,500 square feet of retail space, 7,000 square feet for student amenities and a 10,000-square-foot green roof. A 94-unit, 369-bed first phase is slated to open by the end of 2010.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
A gleaming new apartment building with restaurants and bars on the ground floor has replaced an old pizza place and tire shop. A new Whole Foods will sprout up just down the road. A four-star hotel and bike lanes are planned. The changes are part of a longer-term effort to transform U.S. 1 - the University of Maryland, College Park's main drag - from a jumbled mix of strip malls and fast-food joints. After a decade of slow progress, the building spree jump-starts a plan to remake the city of College Park into a "real" college town.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Twenty years after opening its first large residence for students, the Maryland Institute College of Art plans to build a $16.5 million addition that will increase the number of undergraduates living on campus and help revitalize Baltimore's North Avenue corridor and northern Bolton Hill. College officials intend to break ground this fall on Commons II, a five-story building with 62 apartments that can accommodate about 240 students. When it opens in the fall of 2013, MICA will have on-campus housing for more than 1,000 students, up from practically none in 1991 and enough for more than half of its undergraduates.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | May 20, 2013
Loading his earthly belongings into a laundry cart that he rented from Campus Services, Johns Hopkins University freshman Austin Dennis made several trips from his dormitory room to his car on residential Greenway at North Charles Street, opposite the Homewood campus May 15. It was move-out week for Hopkins students as the school year ended, and Dennis, an economics major, was catching a flight that night to his hometown of Miami, Fla., where he...
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | March 23, 1991
The Maryland Institute College of Art's long-delayed plan for a student housing complex in Bolton Hill is expected to finally move forward next week when Alex. Brown & Sons Inc. brings to market a $12 million bond issue to fund the project.The institute's plans were derailed in August when Moody's Investor Service downgraded the debt of MNC Financial just days before its subsidiary, Maryland National Bank, was to have signed a final construction loan agreement with the school. The lowered rating left MNC unable to sell commercial paper to back up the loan and forced Maryland Institute to delay construction until it could secure new financing.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
The Johns Hopkins University will begin work this summer on a $17 million modernization of Homewood Apartments, a seven-story building at 3003 N. Charles St. that is home to 230 students.University trustees voted last month to move ahead with the development, the largest of five residential projects that Hopkins has launched in recent years to provide attractive student housing near its Homewood campus.Besides providing housing for students, the reconfigured building will have one floor of office space and "upscale retail space," at street level, according to Robert Schuerholz, director of facilities management for Hopkins.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | October 18, 1992
When the Maryland Institute College of Art set out to build its first student housing complex in historic Bolton Hill, administrators wanted to provide all the creature comforts residents have come to expect from on-campus housing: kitchens, private bathrooms, a choice of floor plans.But recognizing the special needs and discriminating tastes of the prospective tenants -- all fine arts majors -- college officials asked their architects to provide even more: a place with a character all its own."
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 19, 2002
Generations of Baltimoreans drew their first breaths at the old Hospital for the Women of Maryland, a Bolton Hill landmark. Now the Maryland Institute College of Art has breathed new life into the building itself, after it had stood vacant for nearly a decade. The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff House is the name of a $16 million student life and residential facility that the Maryland Institute has created inside the shell of the old hospital at Lafayette and John streets. The six story building has been named after two internationally renowned art collectors and philanthropists who gave the institute $4 million.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2002
Morgan State University officials plan to ask the state Board of Public Works tomorrow to approve a contract for a $37 million student dormitory complex on the site of the former Pentridge Apartments, recently demolished on the west side of campus. The planned facility - on 13 acres between Loch Raven Boulevard and Perring Parkway - will house up to 800 students and provide 270 parking places, state documents show. A brisk timetable for completion shows that three-quarters of the housing should be occupied by August of next year.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
The owner of the crime-troubled Stafford Apartments in Mount Vernon says it will outline plans for the building within 90 days, and may lay out how to transform it from federally subsidized housing into student residences. "We're moving quickly to evaluate what to do," said David Robertson, head of affordable housing at AIMCO, a Denver real estate company that owns the building at 716 Washington Place. "This is a unique property in a great location and deserves to be upgraded." Robertson's comments were the first from AIMCO since Congress voided federal restrictions that would have required the 11-story tower near the Washington Monument to remain subsidized housing for 14 more years.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
The proposed $60 million apartment-and-retail development proposed for the Towson Triangle is dredging up an old ambivalence about the character of the Baltimore County seat. Is it a college town? A community for families and children? A commercial downtown? A shopping and entertainment district? A home for empty-nesters? It is, and long has been, all of the above, coexisting in what is at times an uneasy balance that grows more uneasy periodically when any one segment of the community seeks to expand its presence.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 12, 2012
ON THE SITE... Freeh report: Paterno, others protected Sandusky : Penn State's leaders, including Joe Paterno, were more concerned about bad publicity than protecting children, which investigators in a report released this morning found “saddening and sobering.” Columbia car crash kills teenage driver :  Shaquan Jamal Curtis, 17, of the 5300 block of Harpers Farm Road died in the 3:05 a.m. accident. Police said he lost control of the Audi sedan, left Columbia Road near Tarkington Place and struck a tree.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Twenty years after opening its first large residence for students, the Maryland Institute College of Art plans to build a $16.5 million addition that will increase the number of undergraduates living on campus and help revitalize Baltimore's North Avenue corridor and northern Bolton Hill. College officials intend to break ground this fall on Commons II, a five-story building with 62 apartments that can accommodate about 240 students. When it opens in the fall of 2013, MICA will have on-campus housing for more than 1,000 students, up from practically none in 1991 and enough for more than half of its undergraduates.
NEWS
June 17, 2012
I'm happy to hear about the economic benefits of having so many colleges in our city ("Collegetown, USA," June 14). However, I think citizens need to know about the price paid for this economic development. Loud parties every night of the week, no parking, improper disposal of trash and the pests that come with it, and the occasional rampage of vandalism through the neighborhood. All of this is business as usual for those of us who must live alongside the ever growing pockets of off campus student housing.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
— Police said a Frostburg University student stabbed another student during an off-campus party after first pulling a knife on a third student who "would not get out of the way" in a crowded kitchen. The suspect, Shanee Liggins, 23, of Waldorf, was ordered held without bail on first-degree murder and other charges during a brief hearing at District Court in Cumberland. Her parents attended the hearing and met privately with a public defender, but said little as they left the courthouse holding hands.
TRAVEL
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
More than 2,000 Ocean City evacuees have arrived in the Baltimore area for temporary housing during Hurricane Irene, as part of the state's preparations for the storm. Six hundred foreign exchange students traveled in buses from Ocean City on Thursday night and stayed on cots in Burdick Hall, a gymnasium on the Towson University campus, said John Hatten, director of emergency operations for Maryland's Department of Human Resources. In Owings Mills, 395 more students are being housed at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, while 1,000 to 1,100 are staying at the 5th Regiment Armory near Bolton Hill, according to Hatten and human resources department spokesman Ian Patrick Hines.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
The financially troubled Queen Anne Belvedere apartments on Charles Street in Baltimore would become the University of Baltimore's first student housing complex under a proposal being considered by the city.The $6.3 million proposal, from a group called the Queen Anne Belvedere Revitalization Limited Partnership, is one of four submitted to the city by groups vying to buy and renovate the 69-unit apartment complex at 1202 to 1218 and 1301 N. Charles Street.Two other teams indicated that they also want to renovate the city-owned apartments to provide housing for university students and others, but they don't have the university's endorsement.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
A gleaming new apartment building with restaurants and bars on the ground floor has replaced an old pizza place and tire shop. A new Whole Foods will sprout up just down the road. A four-star hotel and bike lanes are planned. The changes are part of a longer-term effort to transform U.S. 1 - the University of Maryland, College Park's main drag - from a jumbled mix of strip malls and fast-food joints. After a decade of slow progress, the building spree jump-starts a plan to remake the city of College Park into a "real" college town.
BUSINESS
By Baltimore Sun staff | October 7, 2010
The University of Baltimore has announced plans by a private developer to build an 11-story, 323-bed apartment building for students on a university-owned parcel of land at the northeast corner of Maryland Avenue and West Biddle Street. The $27 million project marks the first time a developer has undertaken the new construction of student housing in midtown Baltimore, the university said in a news release. The developer, Bethesda-based Potomac Holdings, expects to break ground in April 2011 and to complete the project by summer 2012.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | July 31, 2010
The recent "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition" trip to Baltimore drew attention from every major news outlet in town. As the cameras rolled, hip celebrity carpenters and throngs of local volunteers showed up to work long hours in the Maryland heat. At the end of the week, a great charity received a truly needed new space to help further its mission. And in just a few months, the weeklong ordeal will be broadcast for the nation to see. Squeezing a months-long project into a week makes for great television, and when a prime-time TV show comes to town, that's news.
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