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By Los Angeles Times | November 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Reacting to widespread complaints from Christian legal advocates, the Supreme Court said yesterday that it will reconsider a lower court ruling that bars a state university from subsidizing a student magazine because it espouses an "avowedly Christian" perspective.In recent years, Christian legal groups have complained that the high court's insistence on a strict separation of church and state sometimes translates into discrimination against mainstream religious groups.For example, some school and state college officials have said that their institutions may subsidize student groups which promote feminism, environmentalism, gay rights or a variety of other causes but they may not subsidize student groups that promote religion.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Anthony Alston was appointed by Anne Arundel County Public Schools to address achievement gaps among student groups. But the executive director of the system's new Office of Equity and Accelerated Student Achievement is also well aware of gaps that exist between the school system and some Anne Arundel communities. Alston discovered some of those gaps in early June, when then-interim Superintendent Mamie Perkins created the office to monitor achievement and report to the deputy superintendent.
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NEWS
December 7, 2007
Love story -- The Drama Learning Center, 9130-1 Red Branch Road, will present a love story set to music, Once on This Island, performed by Teaching Young Actors (the center's teen professional company) at 7 p.m. tomorrow, Thursday, and Dec. 14 and 15, and 2 p.m. Sunday and Dec. 15. Tickets are $12 for the evening performances. Reservations are recommended. Matinees for student groups, which are open to everyone, feature a backstage tour, a chance to learn choreography and an opportunity to get autographs.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
Even though Monica Patel can no longer play the violin, her love of music helped her win a four-year scholarship to McDaniel College in Westminster. Patel, who graduated in May from Howard High School, has been involved throughout her high school career with Collision Music, a nonprofit organization that fosters community service through music. Most members of Collision Music play instruments. Patel played violin for many years, but about four years ago, while jumping on a friend's trampoline, she broke both bones in her right arm. She had surgery to install metal plates, then another operation to take the plates out after her bones healed.
NEWS
By Morgan MacDonald | November 24, 2003
AS A COLLEGE student, I am acutely aware of both the legal and social effects of the USA Patriot Act on my life and on the lives of my peers. Passed after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the Patriot Act has led to a broadening of governmental power to define protest as terrorism and to intrude on our fundamental rights as citizens. I am concerned by the Patriot Act's impact on the lives of all citizens, but especially on my peers in colleges across the country. No matter what provision of the Patriot Act we examine, its effects are tenfold on a college campus.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
After the Anne Arundel County school board received its annual update on the system's five-year strategic plan for student achievement, board member Solon Webb directed one question to school officials: "Are we winning or losing?" Webb's query prompted a discussion Wednesday almost as lengthy as the presentation of the 2012 Strategic Plan, which tracks students' five-year progress in Maryland School Assessments and High School Assessments, as well as International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement and honors participation and testing.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
With Howard County's average SAT score at its highest ever, school officials are encouraged by what they see as a gradual improvement among the school system's black and Hispanic students, who have consistently lagged behind their white and Asian counterparts. Results released last week by the College Board show that the county's class of 2005 posted an average score of 1113 on a 1600-point scale - a 16-point jump compared with last year. The verbal score averaged 552; the math score averaged 561. Each section is scored on a scale of 200 to 800. The school system's data analysis, which aimed to weed out errors, produced a slightly higher average of 1115.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | June 15, 2007
Maybe it has been the years of emphasis Howard County schools have placed at the pre-school and kindergarten level. It could be increased interventions -- one school suggests that offering more field trips increases vocabulary. One thing is for sure: Fourth-graders in the county recorded the biggest increases on this year's Maryland School Assessments. Fourth-graders had the highest percentage of students in the county scoring at proficient or above on the assessments -- 93 percent in reading and 91 percent in math.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
COLLEGE PARK -- With Maryland losing its fifth game in a row, at least Terps fans could focus Saturday on the achievements of Torrey Smith, the star of this season's team. Smith had already broken his own Atlantic Coast Conference mark earlier this year for single-season kickoff return yardage. On Saturday, the wide receiver needed just 35 yards to break LaMont Jordan's single-season school record of 1,840 all-purpose yards. He broke the record with a 21-yard reception from Jamarr Robinson in the second quarter.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
Many people view the role of school counselors mainly as providing emotional nurturing while supporting students in their goals and aspirations, says Gayle Cicero, the counseling coordinator for Anne Arundel County schools. And the thought of counselors working to ensure that federal No Child Left Behind goals are met or that schools steadily draw money for students to attend college would seem foreign to some. But today, Cicero says, the best guidance counselors work side by side with teachers to ensure that students excel as early as elementary school and continue to do so after graduating from high school.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Anti-abortion activists at the Johns Hopkins University who had fought to form an official club have been fully recognized, clearing the way for them to use the institution's logo and raise cash on campus. The university announced Wednesday that an earlier decision by the Student Government Association to block the group, Voice for Life, was reversed by a panel of student judges. The issue has set off a storm of debate over free speech and whether anti-abortion "sidewalk counseling" constitutes harassment at the private university.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
After the Anne Arundel County school board received its annual update on the system's five-year strategic plan for student achievement, board member Solon Webb directed one question to school officials: "Are we winning or losing?" Webb's query prompted a discussion Wednesday almost as lengthy as the presentation of the 2012 Strategic Plan, which tracks students' five-year progress in Maryland School Assessments and High School Assessments, as well as International Baccalaureate, Advanced Placement and honors participation and testing.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Suspensions and other disciplinary actions for African-American students fell at Anne Arundel County schools last year because of new practices, said a school system team examining purported racial disparities in punishments. The audit, design and planning team was created by schools Superintendent Kevin Maxwell as part of efforts to address concerns about school discipline, particularly among African-American students, who school officials say make up 22 percent of the school district's enrollment but account for a higher percentage of suspensions.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
Although dozens are vying for Dallas Dance's attention in his first days as Baltimore County school superintendent, he plans to seek out disengaged students and parents of private school students, two groups that he hopes respectively to keep and to attract back into the fold. On Monday, Dance takes on the job of leading the 105,000-student system, which has grown far more racially diverse and economically stratified in the past decade. The 31-year-old Virginia native seems intent on asking those who are unhappy with the system what he must change to support students on the verge of dropping out and to challenge students whose families have the means to go elsewhere.
NEWS
April 25, 2012
Quote: "Nobody cares about what's happening to John Edwards anymore - he's old news. […] Attacking John Edwards for the Republicans would be like attacking George McGovern. " -Donnie Fowler, a technology and political consultant and former senior advisor to President Obama. Former Democratic candidate Edwards' trial regarding alleged illegal campaign contributions began Monday morning. Digit: 3,600: The number of runners/walkers who showed up despite the weather on Sunday for the inaugural Susan G. Komen breast cancer race in Ocean City . The event raised more than $254,000.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Actor Kevin Bacon brought his star power to a charity event Wednesday at the University of Maryland, College Park. But the cheers the actor received were not as loud as the hoots and hollers directed toward the six student groups competing for $5,000 toward their favorite causes. The competition — called the "Do Good" Challenge — is part of an effort by the school to make philanthropy more of a focus in academics and student life. The winner was The Food Recovery Network, which developed a system of collecting food from campus dining halls that would otherwise go to waste and distributing it to homeless shelters.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Sun national staff | November 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Caught in the conflicting currents of its past rulings on free speech, the Supreme Court groped uncertainly yesterday to find a way to rule on a major new dispute over university students' rights.At issue is a claim by University of Wisconsin students that the First Amendment protects them from having to subsidize, through mandatory activity fees, student organizations whose views they oppose.At the end of a one-hour hearing yesterday, the justices appeared to be no nearer to agreeing on a response to that claim.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Actor Kevin Bacon brought his star power to a charity event Wednesday at the University of Maryland, College Park. But the cheers the actor received were not as loud as the hoots and hollers directed toward the six student groups competing for $5,000 toward their favorite causes. The competition — called the "Do Good" Challenge — is part of an effort by the school to make philanthropy more of a focus in academics and student life. The winner was The Food Recovery Network, which developed a system of collecting food from campus dining halls that would otherwise go to waste and distributing it to homeless shelters.
NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
A controversial student group at Towson University has again drawn criticism from other students who claim it is racist. But school administrators say they won't be taking any action against the group. On Saturday night, the group, Youth for Western Civilization, chalked messages that included the words "White Pride" at several visible locations on campus, including the Student Union and Freedom Square, said its president, Matthew Heimbach. When discovered Monday, the messages angered other student groups, who saw them as having nationalist connotations.
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