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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Administrators of Baltimore's Sojourner-Douglass College have not submitted an acceptable financial aid audit since 1982, prompting questions about the allocation of $8 million in federal student financial aid at the college, a lawyer for the U.S. Department of Education alleged.A 1988 review revealed that inadequate record-keeping at Sojourner-Douglass -- a problem cited in a review in the early 1980s -- has continued. The shortcomings include a lack of verification in many student financial aid applications, the review found.
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NEWS
By David Wilson | April 19, 2014
Significant demographic obstacles stand in the path of the state's achieving its goal of ensuring that 55 percent of its population has a two-year post-secondary degree or higher by 2025. The baby boom "echo" - a primarily white phenomenon that resulted in a temporary increase in high school graduates beginning in 1995 - is over. The number of white graduates is now declining steadily and will continue to do so for some time to come. During the upturn, many campuses raised their admissions standards significantly to take advantage of the growing pool of relatively affluent and well-prepared students graduating from high school.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Hundreds of students and supporters of Maryland's historically black colleges and universities rallied Monday in Annapolis to press for increased state funding to make up for decades of discrimination. The presidents of Morgan State University, Coppin State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore joined civil rights leaders and several politicians in front of the State House to call on Gov. Martin O'Malley to settle a lawsuit alleging the schools have been underfunded at least since the 1930s.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Hundreds of students and supporters of Maryland's historically black colleges and universities rallied Monday in Annapolis to press for increased state funding to make up for decades of discrimination. The presidents of Morgan State University, Coppin State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore joined civil rights leaders and several politicians in front of the State House to call on Gov. Martin O'Malley to settle a lawsuit alleging the schools have been underfunded at least since the 1930s.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1998
NEW YORK -- With more than $900 million in gifts and pledges in hand two years ahead of schedule, the Johns Hopkins University's board of trustees decided yesterday to extend the school's fund-raising campaign to $1.2 billion -- a $300 million increase to address pressing needs such as student financial aid.The trustees also announced that one of their own, Bethesda construction magnate A. James Clark, has jump-started the extended campaign with a pledge...
NEWS
By David Wilson | April 19, 2014
Significant demographic obstacles stand in the path of the state's achieving its goal of ensuring that 55 percent of its population has a two-year post-secondary degree or higher by 2025. The baby boom "echo" - a primarily white phenomenon that resulted in a temporary increase in high school graduates beginning in 1995 - is over. The number of white graduates is now declining steadily and will continue to do so for some time to come. During the upturn, many campuses raised their admissions standards significantly to take advantage of the growing pool of relatively affluent and well-prepared students graduating from high school.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to reduce the growing number of student loan defaults, the administration announced a plan yesterday to restructure the Department of Education's student financial aid programs.The management reforms include ensuring that only legitimate institutions participate in the student aid programs and monitoring lenders and guarantee agencies more closely.The recommendations were suggested in a report by an Education Department and Office of Management and Budget team, which found that poor managerial practices in the Guaranteed Student Loan program have resulted in high loan default rates, fraud and abuse.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Greenebaum & Rose Associates Inc., a real estate development firm with operations in Baltimore and Washington, said yesterday that it has been selected to develop an 11-story office building for the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Student Financial Assistance Programs in Washington. The 220,000-square-foot, $28 million project -- which is expected to be completed in July 2001 -- will be the centerpiece of Greenebaum & Rose's Union Center Plaza, a tract of land the firm owns near Union Station in Northeast Washington, said Sam Rose, a partner in the real estate firm.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Alec MacGillis and Mike Bowler and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
Bucking a national trend, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is proposing to shift millions of dollars in state financial aid money from programs based on academic ability to those based on need. The move, which requires legislative approval, would greatly alter the balance of how financial aid is awarded. Maryland, like many other states, has in recent years put more money into merit-based scholarships in an attempt to keep talented students in the state. Today, nearly half of the state's roughly $80 million in aid is given out primarily on the basis of ability, rather than financial need.
NEWS
By Justin Draeger | August 17, 2007
Recently, lawmakers and the media have focused on potentially improper relationships between student financial aid administrators and certain lenders, even going so far as to propose eliminating the position in college student aid offices. These proposed measures could have harmful, unintended consequences for students and parents attempting to finance higher learning. Without an objective third party, consumers would be more prone to manipulation by direct-to-consumer marketing by unscrupulous lenders.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Alec MacGillis and Mike Bowler and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
Bucking a national trend, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is proposing to shift millions of dollars in state financial aid money from programs based on academic ability to those based on need. The move, which requires legislative approval, would greatly alter the balance of how financial aid is awarded. Maryland, like many other states, has in recent years put more money into merit-based scholarships in an attempt to keep talented students in the state. Today, nearly half of the state's roughly $80 million in aid is given out primarily on the basis of ability, rather than financial need.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Greenebaum & Rose Associates Inc., a real estate development firm with operations in Baltimore and Washington, said yesterday that it has been selected to develop an 11-story office building for the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Student Financial Assistance Programs in Washington. The 220,000-square-foot, $28 million project -- which is expected to be completed in July 2001 -- will be the centerpiece of Greenebaum & Rose's Union Center Plaza, a tract of land the firm owns near Union Station in Northeast Washington, said Sam Rose, a partner in the real estate firm.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1998
NEW YORK -- With more than $900 million in gifts and pledges in hand two years ahead of schedule, the Johns Hopkins University's board of trustees decided yesterday to extend the school's fund-raising campaign to $1.2 billion -- a $300 million increase to address pressing needs such as student financial aid.The trustees also announced that one of their own, Bethesda construction magnate A. James Clark, has jump-started the extended campaign with a pledge...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to reduce the growing number of student loan defaults, the administration announced a plan yesterday to restructure the Department of Education's student financial aid programs.The management reforms include ensuring that only legitimate institutions participate in the student aid programs and monitoring lenders and guarantee agencies more closely.The recommendations were suggested in a report by an Education Department and Office of Management and Budget team, which found that poor managerial practices in the Guaranteed Student Loan program have resulted in high loan default rates, fraud and abuse.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Administrators of Baltimore's Sojourner-Douglass College have not submitted an acceptable financial aid audit since 1982, prompting questions about the allocation of $8 million in federal student financial aid at the college, a lawyer for the U.S. Department of Education alleged.A 1988 review revealed that inadequate record-keeping at Sojourner-Douglass -- a problem cited in a review in the early 1980s -- has continued. The shortcomings include a lack of verification in many student financial aid applications, the review found.
NEWS
January 26, 2003
The DE-DC-MD Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Inc. will sponsor College Goal Sunday at 2 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Harford County Higher Education and Applied Technology Center, 1201 Technology Drive, West Wing, Aberdeen 21001. College Goal Sunday invites college-bound students to receive free professional assistance in completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). For more information on College Goal Sunday and to find a list of all locations in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia, students can call 866-GO2GOAL or visit www.GO2GOAL.
NEWS
By New York Times | April 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Education Department says it will tighten up the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, which now has a 17 percent default rate on its $55 billion in loans.Under the plan, the oversight functions and staff in the Office of Postsecondary Education would be expanded, and educational institutions participating in the student aid programs would be more closely monitored to eliminate some trade schools that have high default rates. The average default rate at trade schools is 27 percent, as against 6 percent among four-year colleges.
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