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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
As a professor of art history at McDaniel College, Gretchen McKay always assumed that a student's favorite assignment was the one that could be knocked out in a few easy minutes. As a student who had taken McKay's courses, Joanna Boccio thought her professors threw together class sessions with little planning and less anxiety. It turned out that neither had the other pegged exactly right. McKay and Boccio learned this when they, along with two other professors and seven other students, spent January teaming up to plan new courses for the spring semester.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Caroline Chavasse stood before a room of fidgeting young bodies and wandering eyes and made a tearful plea for her livelihood. The fate of the 51-year-old rested with this group of 40 youngsters who, with a check of a "yes" or "no" box, would decide whether she would be able to pay her mortgage for the next year. "I really do want to come back," Chavasse, a mother of two, told the students of the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School. "This is the best job I've ever had. I love being with you and seeing you grow.
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NEWS
By Yagana Shah, Capital News Service | April 4, 2013
Imagine a classroom where math is taught through the works of Matisse and reading is learned through a dramatic skit instead of a textbook. That's the scenario at several Anne Arundel County public schools that use the practice of arts integration. "Arts integration strategy gets students to work with creativity. It gives them a chance to work with critical thinking," said Suzanne Owens, a visual arts coordinator for AACPS, where administrators believe a fusion of arts and core objectives gives students a better — and longer-lasting — learning experience.
NEWS
By Jane Sundius | January 9, 2014
The nation's top cop and principal visited Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore this week, but not for reasons you think. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan visited Douglass to release federal recommendations on school discipline policies that aim to lower out of school suspensions and ensure that they are no longer handed out to children of color at rates that are double or triple the...
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Students take note: The classroom of the future might make it difficult to pass notes or sit where teachers might not call on you to answer questions. Yet you might consider the departure from the traditional setting a change for the better. That's what officials at Howard Community College say. They have worked with Michigan-based office furniture manufacturing company Herman Miller to create a pilot classroom that is changing the way students and teachers approach instruction. Called the Learning Studio, the classroom all but does away with the front-to-back setting and instead equips it with technology usually reserved for computer labs and auditoriums.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
In the hopes of eventually applying its arts initiative throughout the school system, Anne Arundel County has hired what officials say is one of the first arts integration specialists in the state. The approach, which applies arts-related teaching to all subjects, is in its third year. Susan Riley, who launched the program at Thunder Hill Elementary School in Howard County, became the arts integration specialist this school year. She said that this year, Anne Arundel County's five elementary schools that offer arts integration — Arnold, Crofton Woods, Germantown, Lake Shore and Riviera Beach — will focus heavily on its math component.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Caroline Chavasse stood before a room of fidgeting young bodies and wandering eyes and made a tearful plea for her livelihood. The fate of the 51-year-old rested with this group of 40 youngsters who, with a check of a "yes" or "no" box, would decide whether she would be able to pay her mortgage for the next year. "I really do want to come back," Chavasse, a mother of two, told the students of the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School. "This is the best job I've ever had. I love being with you and seeing you grow.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
THOSE IN the business of assessing higher education usually leave out two important factors that can't be examined in a pencil-and-paper test: What students put into their college experience is closely related to what they get out of it. And college students are a pretty good judge of their own education. A national campus survey is attempting to fill that vacuum. The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE, or "Nessie") released last month its third annual report based on information from 135,000 students at 613 colleges and universities, 12 in Maryland.
NEWS
By Jane Sundius | January 9, 2014
The nation's top cop and principal visited Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore this week, but not for reasons you think. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan visited Douglass to release federal recommendations on school discipline policies that aim to lower out of school suspensions and ensure that they are no longer handed out to children of color at rates that are double or triple the...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Embattled Coppin State University President Reginald S. Avery will step down in January, nearly a year after faculty gave him a vote of no confidence for lacking vision and before his initiatives to improve the state's lowest graduation rates have shown any progress. Avery, 66, who announced the move Wednesday, said that the vote did not factor into his decision, but that he felt the time was right to "step aside" after five years leading the West Baltimore institution. He acknowledged that a turnaround hadn't occurred, but said he plans to return to the classroom where he would continue seeking to improve student engagement on the campus and in the community.
NEWS
By Yagana Shah, Capital News Service | April 4, 2013
Imagine a classroom where math is taught through the works of Matisse and reading is learned through a dramatic skit instead of a textbook. That's the scenario at several Anne Arundel County public schools that use the practice of arts integration. "Arts integration strategy gets students to work with creativity. It gives them a chance to work with critical thinking," said Suzanne Owens, a visual arts coordinator for AACPS, where administrators believe a fusion of arts and core objectives gives students a better — and longer-lasting — learning experience.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Embattled Coppin State University President Reginald S. Avery will step down in January, nearly a year after faculty gave him a vote of no confidence for lacking vision and before his initiatives to improve the state's lowest graduation rates have shown any progress. Avery, 66, who announced the move Wednesday, said that the vote did not factor into his decision, but that he felt the time was right to "step aside" after five years leading the West Baltimore institution. He acknowledged that a turnaround hadn't occurred, but said he plans to return to the classroom where he would continue seeking to improve student engagement on the campus and in the community.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Students take note: The classroom of the future might make it difficult to pass notes or sit where teachers might not call on you to answer questions. Yet you might consider the departure from the traditional setting a change for the better. That's what officials at Howard Community College say. They have worked with Michigan-based office furniture manufacturing company Herman Miller to create a pilot classroom that is changing the way students and teachers approach instruction. Called the Learning Studio, the classroom all but does away with the front-to-back setting and instead equips it with technology usually reserved for computer labs and auditoriums.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
In the hopes of eventually applying its arts initiative throughout the school system, Anne Arundel County has hired what officials say is one of the first arts integration specialists in the state. The approach, which applies arts-related teaching to all subjects, is in its third year. Susan Riley, who launched the program at Thunder Hill Elementary School in Howard County, became the arts integration specialist this school year. She said that this year, Anne Arundel County's five elementary schools that offer arts integration — Arnold, Crofton Woods, Germantown, Lake Shore and Riviera Beach — will focus heavily on its math component.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
As a professor of art history at McDaniel College, Gretchen McKay always assumed that a student's favorite assignment was the one that could be knocked out in a few easy minutes. As a student who had taken McKay's courses, Joanna Boccio thought her professors threw together class sessions with little planning and less anxiety. It turned out that neither had the other pegged exactly right. McKay and Boccio learned this when they, along with two other professors and seven other students, spent January teaming up to plan new courses for the spring semester.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
THOSE IN the business of assessing higher education usually leave out two important factors that can't be examined in a pencil-and-paper test: What students put into their college experience is closely related to what they get out of it. And college students are a pretty good judge of their own education. A national campus survey is attempting to fill that vacuum. The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE, or "Nessie") released last month its third annual report based on information from 135,000 students at 613 colleges and universities, 12 in Maryland.
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 7, 1996
While their peers enjoyed the sun and sand of Florida, four Western Maryland College students and one administrator spent spring break pounding nails and painting rooms in a volunteer community service project.The WMC-based program -- Students Engaged in Rural Volunteer Experiences -- helps impoverished residents of rural towns make repairs and additions to their homes and to community buildings. This year, the volunteers did the fund raising, but as a college program, SERVE is eligible for funds from the school.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
The Johns Hopkins School of Education Neuro-Education Initiative will host its second annual summit and roundtable discussion on the practical applications of brain research on Wednesday at the American Visionary Art Museum. This year's topic, "Attention and Engagement in Learning," will explore current research on attention and student engagement. For more information or to register, go to http://www.education.jhu.edu/nei. liz.bowie@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 7, 1996
While their peers enjoyed the sun and sand of Florida, four Western Maryland College students and one administrator spent spring break pounding nails and painting rooms in a volunteer community service project.The WMC-based program -- Students Engaged in Rural Volunteer Experiences -- helps impoverished residents of rural towns make repairs and additions to their homes and to community buildings. This year, the volunteers did the fund raising, but as a college program, SERVE is eligible for funds from the school.
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