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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Baltimore County school leaders are reconsidering discipline policies that have led to one of the highest suspension rates in the state, saying they want to reduce the number of times students are sent home for minor infractions. A revamped discipline code, made public for the first time this week, would encourage staff and teachers to intervene with students before they are suspended and would give principals more flexibility in how they deal with bad behavior. The school board will consider the new policy over the next month and will vote on it in April.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Delvond Grady disliked attending middle school at New Hope Academy so much, he began finding ways to get sent home. "I started to do stuff, mostly just being all kinds of disrespectful, on purpose, just to get suspended," said Delvond, now a ninth-grader at the Baltimore school. But the school's administrators decided they weren't going to let students like Delvond, who were being suspended for nonviolent offenses, take a few days off because they were bored. They changed their approach to discipline and have seen a precipitous drop in suspensions.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 15, 2013
The Baltimore city school system released this month the results of its annual school climate surveys, now called "School Surveys," which poll staff, students and parents on their satisfaction with everything from academic support to school safety. While the school district reported that the results of the survey were generally positive when it came to overall satisfaction with schools--except their physical infrastructure--the results also show that there was notable dissatisfaction with the climate in several of them.  Of note, staff and students responded that there is a lack of discipline and consequences in schools, a reoccuring conversation in the district since it implemented a student discipline code that has sought to discourage suspensions for non-violent offenses.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Eleven students at Annapolis High School have been disciplined after an inappropriate picture of a classmate was circulated via text message and social media, school officials said. After school on Monday, a school administrator was alerted to a social media posting involving a student that had an inappropriate message underneath it, said Bob Mosier, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Public School System. By Tuesday morning, the school's investigation determined that one student took a picture of another student without their knowledge.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2003
Rule-breakers, beware: Anne Arundel County school officials are revamping the way they deal with students who misbehave. After spending the better part of this school year making changes to raise student achievement, Superintendent Eric J. Smith told the school board last night that he is turning his attention to creating a "safe and orderly environment." Changes will include consistent enforcement of discipline in county schools, prescribing punishments aimed at discouraging repeat offenses, and offering more support for students who break the rules.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Delvond Grady disliked attending middle school at New Hope Academy so much, he began finding ways to get sent home. "I started to do stuff, mostly just being all kinds of disrespectful, on purpose, just to get suspended," said Delvond, now a ninth-grader at the Baltimore school. But the school's administrators decided they weren't going to let students like Delvond, who were being suspended for nonviolent offenses, take a few days off because they were bored. They changed their approach to discipline and have seen a precipitous drop in suspensions.
NEWS
February 1, 1995
Maybe there was a time when the most serious discipline problem in the schools was an occasional spitball or a playground brawl. No more.Nowadays, student misconduct not only disrupts the classroom, it threatens lives. Violence has become so commonplace in Baltimore schools, the City Council on Monday voted unanimously to hire more police officers to patrol the school hallways.Today, the Anne Arundel County Board of Education will look for its own solutions to the discipline dilemma when it considers tougher policies proposed by Superintendent Carol S. Parham.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1994
More women must be encouraged to participate in Anne Arundel County school sports programs to help erase a 3-to-1 ratio of male to female coaches, according to a committee.The Gender Equity Committee is scheduled to give its report, and recommendations for changing school sports programs, to the eight-member county school board later today.The meeting, at school headquarters on Riva Road in Annapolis, is scheduled to begin at 10:30 a.m.; the equity report is scheduled to be presented at 1:50 p.m.In a written report distributed this week, the committee noted that all of the athletic directors at the county's 12 high schools are male, and that there are only two female assistant athletic directors.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
From September 1991 to June 1992, 14,000 Anne Arundel County students were written up for behavior problems. Of those, 5,200 were suspended, 273 expelled.Those daunting numbers, combined with fears that students are not being punished severely enough and that black students are disproportionately singled out, are discussed in a report on student discipline being presented to the county Board of Education tomorrow.Like many school systems across the country, Anne Arundel faces increasing discipline problems, ranging from disruptive behavior to fighting to possessing weapons.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The Towson University cheerleading team is scheduled for an appeals hearing Friday after being accused of hazing and suspended from competing. The national championship-winning team's hearing will be in front of the school's student appeals committee, university spokeswoman Gay Pinder said. Last month, the entire team was suspended from competing for the school year following the hazing allegations. Officials have not released any details on what the cheerleaders are accused of doing.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The Towson University cheerleading team is scheduled for an appeals hearing Friday after being accused of hazing and suspended from competing. The national championship-winning team's hearing will be in front of the school's student appeals committee, university spokeswoman Gay Pinder said. Last month, the entire team was suspended from competing for the school year following the hazing allegations. Officials have not released any details on what the cheerleaders are accused of doing.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 15, 2013
The Baltimore city school system released this month the results of its annual school climate surveys, now called "School Surveys," which poll staff, students and parents on their satisfaction with everything from academic support to school safety. While the school district reported that the results of the survey were generally positive when it came to overall satisfaction with schools--except their physical infrastructure--the results also show that there was notable dissatisfaction with the climate in several of them.  Of note, staff and students responded that there is a lack of discipline and consequences in schools, a reoccuring conversation in the district since it implemented a student discipline code that has sought to discourage suspensions for non-violent offenses.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Suspensions and other disciplinary actions for African-American students fell at Anne Arundel County schools last year because of new practices, said a school system team examining purported racial disparities in punishments. The audit, design and planning team was created by schools Superintendent Kevin Maxwell as part of efforts to address concerns about school discipline, particularly among African-American students, who school officials say make up 22 percent of the school district's enrollment but account for a higher percentage of suspensions.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Despite a barrage of public comments, many negative, Maryland State Board of Education members said Tuesday that they will push forward with plans to reduce the use of long-term suspensions and expulsions in student discipline. "Everybody gets that kids need to be in school," said board President James H. DeGraffenreidt Jr. "The question is how do we do that?" The board received more than 200 written comments after asking for public input when it released a report in late February, detailing proposed changes that would reduce suspensions for nonviolent offenses.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Baltimore County school leaders are reconsidering discipline policies that have led to one of the highest suspension rates in the state, saying they want to reduce the number of times students are sent home for minor infractions. A revamped discipline code, made public for the first time this week, would encourage staff and teachers to intervene with students before they are suspended and would give principals more flexibility in how they deal with bad behavior. The school board will consider the new policy over the next month and will vote on it in April.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Anne Arundel County schools have not made sufficient progress in eliminating racial bias from its student disciplinary practices, according to a civil rights complaint filed by the NAACP. The complaint, filed with the civil rights office of the U.S. Department of Education on Friday, alleges that the numbers of African-American students referred for discipline and suspended have hardly changed since a similar complaint in 2004. That complaint led to an improvement plan agreed to in 2005 by the NAACP and the school system.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
A report on student discipline released by Anne Arundel County school officials shows that the number of students expelled fell more than 13 percent from the 2003-2004 school year to last year. According to the report, issued last week, 391 students were expelled in the 2004-2005 school year, down from the 451 expelled in 2003-2004. Also, fewer major disciplinary offenses were reported. However, in a poll of seventh- and 11th-graders last school year, fewer said they felt safe in their classrooms compared with the previous year.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
Maryland's school board will consider passing a regulation that would limit the time a school district can keep a student out of school waiting for a decision on the appeal of a suspension or expulsion. After a Fairfax County, Va., student committed suicide following a long suspension from school, the Maryland board asked state administrators to survey school systems for their policies. "It is clear what happened in Fairfax could happen in any district in Maryland," board member Kate Walsh said Tuesday after seeing the survey results.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
Seven Baltimore students have been disciplined in connection with a fight that broke out in the stands of a City College basketball game last week as the team played crosstown rivals Edmondson High, according to school officials. The game, which was suspended as City led Edmondson 48-34 with less than six minutes left to play, will be completed next week at an undisclosed location, said Jonathan Brice, executive director of the school system's office of student support and safety.
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