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Student Achievement Program

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NEWS
February 19, 1997
AFTER 10 YEARS, we would have expected a program designed to improve academic performance of African American children to show tangible results.Despite a decade of the Black Student Achievement Program, however, only 72 percent of black students in Howard County passed the Maryland Functional Tests by the end of ninth grade last year, compared with 95 percent of white students.This disparity exists even though the income gap between the races is less pronounced in suburban Howard than in many communities.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
Some Howard County students are donning their director's caps and exploring the world of filmmaking over the next few weeks, proving that summer school isn't just for students who are failing classes anymore. In fact, beginning Monday, more than a thousand students will be going to summer school in Howard County to try to get a jump on their classmates or to participate in enrichment activities at the school system's summer camps. For example, nearly 300 students are expected to participate in the Gifted and Talented Summer Institute for Talent Development at the Homewood School and Oakland Mills High School.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
Parents, students and teachers last night asked the Howard County school board either to restore cuts made by Superintendent Michael E. Hickey in his proposed 1992-1993 operating budget or not to cut programs that have escaped the ax.The public hearing on Mr. Hickey's $183.7 million budget request brought out advocates for programs such as the Black Student Achievement program, sports, psychologists and pupil personnel workers, music, math and science, all targeted for budget reductions next year.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
A group of excited teenage boys marvel at their latest accomplishment - a miniature roller coaster that they designed. A floor below, braids fly through the air with each simultaneous stomp as 14 teenage girls perform a step routine under the watchful eye of instructor Maleeta Kitchen, a second-grade teacher at Running Brook Elementary School. "Arms are still not together," Kitchen said to the girls, who were perfecting a routine where they spoof Making the Band, a hit MTV show. "We cannot have a delayed reaction."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Some Howard County black high school students will gather at Hammond High School tomorrow for a leadership retreat that will mix academics with contemporary music and other elements of "hip-hop" culture."
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 1997
AT THE END of this school year, the county's Black Student Achievement Program honored African-American graduates in a "Celebration of Excellence."Each student was encouraged to write a goal statement, which was printed in the evening's brochure.A sampling:Jennifer Natalie Ruth Sigler says, "Ten years from now, I will be psychiatrist. I hope to have completed medical school, and be on my way to starting my own private practice."Quianna Simira Butler hopes that she will "be an independent woman working for a very well-known and prestigious company as a marketing representative."
NEWS
April 25, 1994
Kacy WilliamsSchool: Hammond High SchoolHometown: ColumbiaAge: 17Kacy Williams is a straight-A student who helped lead her school's girls basketball team to its second state title in three years.While Kacy is known as a good student, she's better known as an athlete. In soccer, she's been named to All-County, All-Metro, All-State and All-South teams. In basketball, The Sun's Co-Player of the Year belongs to All-County and All-Metro teams, as well as to the Maryland Women's Basketball Coaches Association's Senior All-Star and All-Academic teams.
NEWS
February 23, 1992
From: Francis H. CollinsEllicott CityI want to clear up some things in Erik Nelson's article on Sunday, Feb. 16 (Howard County Sun, "Wal-Mart barters for rezoning approval").Wal-Mart said they would participate, not pay for improvementsto the road.The tree shrubs and open space are almost always a must in this kind of project, anyway.We have had regulations on commercial screening in our building code for years, so we do not look on this as a gift.RACISM CUTS BOTH WAYSFrom: Frederick EverhartColumbiaThe Howard County Sun has recently published several news articles on the certain concerns of the local NAACP about racism.
NEWS
July 25, 1993
On behalf of the school system, and in particular the Black Student Achievement Program and the Office of Human Relations, I must take issue on several fronts with Kevin Thomas' "Comment" columns of June 20 and July 11.It is difficult to imagine what possible purpose Mr. Thomas hopes serve by attempting to pit one school system program against another. In our efforts as educators to ensure academic success for all students there are no "second-tier programs." Such a systemic problem as underachievement can only be addressed systemically and BSAP has been but one resource directed at this issue.
NEWS
March 10, 1992
For more than a year now, proposed budget cuts have drawn fire from affected constituencies. State troopers and advocates for the poor marched on Annapolis. Government workers and teachers have complained bitterly about having to forgo pay raises. Yet the Howard County Board of Education's odd response when groups opposed cuts in the county's Black Student Achievement Program seems out of sync.Last month, BSAP supporters showed up at a county budget hearing to protest cuts that could sorely tax the program's reach and effectiveness.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
A group of excited teenage boys marvel at their latest accomplishment - a miniature roller coaster that they designed. A floor below, braids fly through the air with each simultaneous stomp as 14 teenage girls perform a step routine under the watchful eye of instructor Maleeta Kitchen, a second-grade teacher at Running Brook Elementary School. "Arms are still not together," Kitchen said to the girls, who were perfecting a routine where they spoof Making the Band, a hit MTV show. "We cannot have a delayed reaction."
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Nine-year-old Jasmine Phillips stood up in front of her after-school program in Columbia and acted out the role of a single mother telling her sons she could not afford to buy candy. Standing nearby, Daniel McDonald, a professional actor and regular performer at Toby's Dinner Theatre, coaxed her to think about her performance, asking, "Does she feel good about telling her son that?" Jasmine thought that over for a moment in silence, and McDonald added, "I know its tough, but you're an actress now."
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2004
This summer, 10-year-old Jared Cole-Lewis has a rare luxury: daily computer time at school. Jared and his classmates are editing an action movie they scripted and videotaped as part of the Black Student Achievement Program's Summer Bridge program. Despite the name, Summer Bridge seeks to do more than fill the gap between mid-June and late August for its students. "We're trying to accelerate them," said Ron Morris, assistant principal of Bellows Spring Elementary and one of two administrators on site at Wilde Lake High.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2004
This summer, 10-year-old Jared Cole-Lewis has a rare luxury: daily computer time at school. Jared and his classmates are editing an action movie they scripted and videotaped as part of the Black Student Achievement Program's Summer Bridge program. Despite the name, Summer Bridge seeks to do more than fill the gap between mid-June and late August for its students. "We're trying to accelerate them," said Ron Morris, assistant principal of Bellows Spring Elementary and one of two administrators on site at Wilde Lake High.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
Racism is rampant in the Howard County public school system, teens from nine of the county's 11 high schools told education officials last night during a forum organized by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings to offer students a chance to air their grievances and suggest solutions. Over and over, black students stood up to say they were given minimal encouragement from some teachers, shown few role models, steered away from advanced classes and generally considered lesser than their white counterparts.
NEWS
February 10, 2002
Schools must close gap for minority students The Maryland State Department of Education has mandated closing the gap in educational performance of African American and other ethnically minority students. The African American Coalition Of Howard County is pleased that Superintendent O'Rourke, in his message transmitting the FY 2003 budget, cited a commitment to "close and ultimately eliminate, achievement gaps." Our concern is that the resources requested in the instructional budget appear to support only the current level of services, which will simply maintain the intolerable current level of educational performance gap for African Americans and many other students.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
Parents, teachers, community groups and students crowded the Board of Education's meeting room last night to ask board members to add money to Superintendent John R. O'Rourke's already bulging proposed operating budget. One group fairly dominated the board's first public hearing on the proposed $389.6 million budget - parents and students from the county's successful Black Student Achievement Program. BSAP falls under the system's Department of Academic Support, which seeks to understand and minimize dysfunctional patterns and gaps in academic achievement.
NEWS
By Jessica Bacharach and Jessica Bacharach,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
He stood small against the large wood frame of the lectern, clenching the microphone between two fingers, oval eyeglasses overwhelming his heart-shaped face. But his voice pierced the audience with waves of intensity and soft melody. "Poetry, unless it moves you to do something, is meaningless," Amiri Baraka said. An award-winning African-American writer, musician, political activist and professor, Baraka, 66, began writing as a child. He spoke last week at a senior awards program sponsored by River Hill High School Black Student Achievement Program Parent Advisory Council.
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