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BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | July 28, 2002
Owners of homes that have synthetic stucco, or "EIFS" exterior siding, may be affected by a class action lawsuit settlement involving Dryvit, a major manufacturer of the product. Exterior insulation and finish system, or EIFS (pronounced "eefs" by most in the industry), is a siding system designed to look like traditional masonry stucco but contains no cement or other masonry components. Instead, it consists of a core of rigid foam insulation boards, with layers of polymers and glass fibers applied to provide strength, texture, color and imperviousness to water.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
One of the finest waterfront properties on Gibson Island in Anne Arundel County is the contemporary three-story stucco home at 1621 St. Giles Road. "[The house] is just stunning, with sweeping views across Otter Pond and all the way to the Chesapeake Bay, the bridge and the Baltimore lighthouse," said Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage agent Ellie Shorb, who has listed the property for $1.97 million. "You can see the water from every living space and bedroom. " These bright living spaces are part of the home's open floor plan.
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BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | December 16, 2001
Steve Keller of Baltimore sent a note about his 70-year-old stucco house where plaster on one of the interior walls has developed some minor water damage. A roofer determined that the source of the water was a leak at the original, copper flashings on the roof. So Steve and his wife replaced the flashings in question at considerable expense. But another possible cause of the moisture could be water coming through the stucco exterior wall. In that case, he asks, should a sealer be applied to the stucco to waterproof it?
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
No matter how many pieces of art and sculpture or funny street lamps are installed along North Avenue, it's still that pair of 1920s Mediterranean-style stucco towers that anchor this part of Baltimore. They are the twin architectural flourishes atop the old North Avenue Market, which had an uncelebrated 80th birthday this week. The privately owned market opened Nov. 16, 1928.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 11, 2007
Can you apply stucco to the exterior of a brick home? What tips can you share to ensure the stucco does not peel off? Yes, you can. Not only do you need the right tools and equipment, but you also need good hand-eye coordination to do the job well. These challenges are not insurmountable. You can rent the needed scaffolding and power mixer that will be required for the job. I recommend that you hone your technique on a practice wall before trying to stucco your house. First, inspect your existing brick.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 5, 1996
We live in a two-story, Spanish-colonial style home. The floor of the entrance hall is covered in ceramic tiles with a geometric design. We would like to emphasize the Spanish influence, but we can't afford many new furnishings. How can we make the house more consistently Spanish-colonial in its styling?The quickest and least expensive solution is probably to change the color and texture of the entrance hall. How about painting the stairway wall white and giving it a troweled stucco treatment?
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
One day in 1999, Barry and Sharon Weiss decided they wanted to spend less of their time in their cars and more of their time in their home. They lived 22 miles from where their children were attending schools in Baltimore, and Sharon Weiss was making daily trips between the schools and the Reisterstown house they were outgrowing. Barry Weiss was driving 600 miles a week to and from work in Washington. "It was just too much of a commute," he said. On a day when he was at home to discuss with an architect the prospects of putting an addition on their home, his wife spotted a Roland Park house for sale that was within walking distance of their daughter's school, Bryn Mawr.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 18, 2003
CARMEL VALLEY, Calif. - In most ways, Bill Ingram's rocks are just like the real thing. They last forever - or almost as long as actual stone - and you can climb them, kick them, jump up and down on them, if you like, without worrying about damage. But the best thing about them, said the Carmel Valley plastering contractor who makes them, is that they just fade into the background. And that's exactly what they're meant to do. "They blend with the rest of the garden," said Ingram, owner of Carmel Plastering and a resident of Cachagua.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
One of the finest waterfront properties on Gibson Island in Anne Arundel County is the contemporary three-story stucco home at 1621 St. Giles Road. "[The house] is just stunning, with sweeping views across Otter Pond and all the way to the Chesapeake Bay, the bridge and the Baltimore lighthouse," said Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage agent Ellie Shorb, who has listed the property for $1.97 million. "You can see the water from every living space and bedroom. " These bright living spaces are part of the home's open floor plan.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 20, 1993
Sometimes when readers ask us how to solve an unusual problem, it's like asking a doctor to diagnose a strange illness over the phone. Now, where, exactly, does it hurt?A few people send pictures, and that's a help. But often the cause of the problem -- much less the solution to it -- isn't obvious. That was the case recently when a couple in Bolton Hill asked us why large patches of plaster were peeling off the interior side of exterior walls in their old house. They sent several photos.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
One day in 1999, Barry and Sharon Weiss decided they wanted to spend less of their time in their cars and more of their time in their home. They lived 22 miles from where their children were attending schools in Baltimore, and Sharon Weiss was making daily trips between the schools and the Reisterstown house they were outgrowing. Barry Weiss was driving 600 miles a week to and from work in Washington. "It was just too much of a commute," he said. On a day when he was at home to discuss with an architect the prospects of putting an addition on their home, his wife spotted a Roland Park house for sale that was within walking distance of their daughter's school, Bryn Mawr.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | November 25, 2007
Because so many Americans travel abroad, we're seeing frequent attempts to replicate other cultures' interior designs here at home. It isn't easy to transplant a setting from Europe, Asia or Latin America to a typical American home. Traditional Japanese interiors may be the most difficult to reproduce. American travelers who stay at a ryokan, a traditional Japanese guesthouse, are often smitten with this look, and some want to transform a den or basement into a replica of the room they booked in Tokyo or Kyoto.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 11, 2007
Can you apply stucco to the exterior of a brick home? What tips can you share to ensure the stucco does not peel off? Yes, you can. Not only do you need the right tools and equipment, but you also need good hand-eye coordination to do the job well. These challenges are not insurmountable. You can rent the needed scaffolding and power mixer that will be required for the job. I recommend that you hone your technique on a practice wall before trying to stucco your house. First, inspect your existing brick.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | October 5, 2007
Baltimore's Beverly Hills neighborhood may not have palm trees, swimming pools or movie stars, but the subdued ambience of its wide, tree-lined streets and architectural diversity of the homes make it one of the most desirable locations in the city's northeast section. The Arts and Crafts home of Shan Abeywickrama and Brad Parker sits on a quiet street off busy Moravia Road. Around it, on perfectly landscaped lawns, are brick rowhouses with Tudor-style gables, stone cottages and large bungalows covered in cedar shakes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | June 17, 2007
It has been just over two years since the Howard County chapter of Habitat for Humanity finished its first house, on Harriet Tubman Lane in Columbia, but the group's groundbreaking Friday in Jessup for two more houses showed how much things have changed for the faith-based group. The event was a virtual extravaganza of political, business and community support under a large white party tent, complete with celebratory T-shirts on every folding chair and fruit and bagels on a side table.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 18, 2003
CARMEL VALLEY, Calif. - In most ways, Bill Ingram's rocks are just like the real thing. They last forever - or almost as long as actual stone - and you can climb them, kick them, jump up and down on them, if you like, without worrying about damage. But the best thing about them, said the Carmel Valley plastering contractor who makes them, is that they just fade into the background. And that's exactly what they're meant to do. "They blend with the rest of the garden," said Ingram, owner of Carmel Plastering and a resident of Cachagua.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | August 7, 1991
Pompeian Inc., the largest and oldest importer, bottler and distributor of olive oil in the country, is expanding its East Baltimore plant to handle a demand for its product that has tripled in six years.Work has already begun on the $2 million expansion of the company's building in the 4200 block of Pulaski Highway, where the company has operated since 1906, company officials said.The expansion, which is being handled by Baltimore general contractor Image Construction Group, will add about 42,290 square feet to the company's existing 98,600 square feet of space.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
The house where Robin Swift spent her childhood was a stucco mansion with 12 bathrooms on a steep hill outside Boston. Memories of the drafty, frightening house left her with a yearning for a place small and charming.That's exactly what Ms. Swift found one day as she made her way to the Ruxton Country School, where she teaches fifth- through eighth-graders.Responding to a small hand-painted "For Sale by Owner" sign outside a tiny stucco house in the heart of Ruxton, she met with the owner and made a quick decision.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | July 28, 2002
Owners of homes that have synthetic stucco, or "EIFS" exterior siding, may be affected by a class action lawsuit settlement involving Dryvit, a major manufacturer of the product. Exterior insulation and finish system, or EIFS (pronounced "eefs" by most in the industry), is a siding system designed to look like traditional masonry stucco but contains no cement or other masonry components. Instead, it consists of a core of rigid foam insulation boards, with layers of polymers and glass fibers applied to provide strength, texture, color and imperviousness to water.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | December 16, 2001
Steve Keller of Baltimore sent a note about his 70-year-old stucco house where plaster on one of the interior walls has developed some minor water damage. A roofer determined that the source of the water was a leak at the original, copper flashings on the roof. So Steve and his wife replaced the flashings in question at considerable expense. But another possible cause of the moisture could be water coming through the stucco exterior wall. In that case, he asks, should a sealer be applied to the stucco to waterproof it?
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