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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | October 16, 1994
RICHMOND, Va. -- Gymnast Kerri Strug's road to recovery could lead to the Team World Championships next month in Germany.Strug, who missed the nationals in late August because of a strained back, was second behind Dominique Dawes of Gaithersburg in the all-around standings of the World Team Trials last night after the compulsory round.Dawes had a 46.620 score and Strug was at 46.140 entering the optional round today at the Richmond Coliseum. Amanda Borden, from Cincinnati, was third with 45.780.
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June 15, 2001
Who's hot The White Sox have won 16 of their past 19 games and are two games under .500 for the first time since April 19. Who's not The Indians went 2-4 on their homestand and dropped to 18-14 at Jacobs Field. Line of the day Brian Daubach, Red Sox first baseman AB ..... R ..... H ..... RBI ..... HR 4 ....... 1 ..... 2 ...... 4 ........ 1 On deck Al Leiter and the Mets play host to Andy Pettitte and the Yankees. He said it "One thing you can't do when you're in a funk is feel sorry for your self.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- Injured American gymnast Kerri Strug made the round of talk shows yesterday. Somewhere between NBC's "The Today Show" in the morning and CNN's "Talk Back Live" in the afternoon, the 18-year-old from Tucson, Ariz., came to a decision expected by everyone who watched her badly injure her left ankle in Tuesday night's optional finals: She would not compete in today's all-around competition at the Georgia Dome."I'm disappointed about my ankle," said Strug. "I made a decision to pull out of the all-around competition so I can compete in the event finals [Sunday and]
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1996
Kerri Strug, who went from relative unknown to Olympic hero by helping the U.S. women's gymnastics team to a gold medal last month in Atlanta despite competing on a badly sprained ankle, will not be part of the team's post-Olympic tour this fall. But it's not because of the injury.While her six Olympic teammates will begin a 34-show tour later this month that will stop at USAir Arena on Oct. 13, Strug will be the star attraction of what originally had been a tour of Russian gymnasts that will include a show at the Baltimore Arena in late October or early November.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1996
BOSTON -- There were not many questions left to be answered in the women's optionals of the U.S. Olympic gymnastics trials last night.The fate of injured stars Shannon Miller and Dominique Moceanu had been decided after compulsories Friday, their places on the team of seven going to Atlanta later this month guaranteed. Four of the other five spots probably were locked up, too.But Dominique Dawes and Kerri Strug had an entirely different agenda. Despite being members of the 1992 team that won a bronze medal in Barcelona, Spain, Dawes and Strug had been in the shadows of Miller and Moceanu.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
ATLANTA -- Before a flag-waving, "U-S-A" chanting crowd of 35,400 at the Georgia Dome last night, an experienced and determined bunch of teen-age girls shook off the ghosts of past American disappointments and, in the case of Kerri Strug, a badly injured ankle, to win the women's team gymnastic competition for the first time in Olympic history.Strug, an 18-year-old from Tucson, Ariz., shook off the numbing pain in her left leg and landed on both feet before hopping on her right foot and then collapsing in agony on the mat. Before she was helped to her feet, the judges awarded Strug a score of 9.712, giving the Americans the victory by .821 of a point over Russia.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | August 16, 1995
NEW ORLEANS -- The world team trials are less than a month away. The world gymnastics championships in Japan are less than two months down the road. And the 1996 Olympic Games seem to be getting closer by the moment.Which is why this year's U.S. national championships, which began today here at the Louisiana Superdome, are a crucial step for those who have been there before and those trying to get there for the first time."It's a chance to get more experience," said Kerri Strug, who at 14 was a member of the bronze-medal-winning Olympic team in Barcelona.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | October 17, 1994
RICHMOND, Va. -- Dominique Dawes won the all-around title in the gymnastics World Team Trials last night and will lead one of the United States' strongest teams to the World Team Championships next month in Germany.Dawes, 17, from Gaithersburg, won the all-around title with a score of 77.960. She led all eight rounds of the two-day meet at the Richmond Coliseum and last night had two scintillating performances in the uneven bars and vault.The top six finishers from yesterday's field of 14, plus two-time world champion Shannon Miller, who did not participate, will represent the United States.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1996
ATLANTA -- Kerri Strug batted leadoff for the U.S. women's gymnastics team during the first two rotations of yesterday's compulsories at the 1996 Olympic Games. Then she batted cleanup for the last two rotations. It was not only her versatility, but also her willingness to sacrifice personal gain for collective glory that summed up what turned into a wonderful afternoon for the Americans at the Georgia Dome.Strug, who at 14 was the youngest member of the 1992 team that won a bronze medal in Barcelona, Spain, set the tone with her first routine on the uneven bars and finished a nearly flawless performance by the Americans with her team's two highest scores.
SPORTS
July 24, 1996
How hot it wasTemperature: High 92, low 73Humidity: 75 percent maximum, 55 percent most of the dayHeat index: 110 degreesPlaying with painThe U.S. women's gymnastics squad captured its first team Olympic gold medal after a dramatic vault by Kerri Strug. She collapsed in pain with a badly sprained ankle within seconds of landing.Strug, before a wildly cheering crowd of 32,048 at the Georgia Dome, was in instant pain after landing her final vault. Her left ankle recoiled upon impact, but Strug held her spot on one leg before dropping to her knees in severe pain.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
Jessica Sullivan and her two older sisters, Katie and Stephanie, did what many other Americans did when the U.S. women's gymnastics squad won a team gold medal at the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta: They watched every flip, tumble and somersault with wide-eyed amazement."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1996
ATLANTA -- The two scenes, played out nine days and some 90 miles apart, were remarkably similar: a young American female athlete nearly knocked out by an injury, only to shake off the pain and lead her team to a gold medal in the Olympics.Both gymnast Kerri Strug and soccer player Mia Hamm suffered sprained ankles, and both had to be helped to the medals ceremony by their teammates and coaches.But the image of Strug will be forever etched into the lore of the Centennial Olympics, while Hamm's moments of struggle and conquest are barely remembered days after they happened.
SPORTS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1996
ATLANTA -- The moment Kerri Strug decided to attempt the final vault of the women's gymnastics team competition, despite the throbbing in her injured ankle, the Atlanta Olympic Games had its first indelible moment.Unfortunately, that image of heroism was overtaken early yesterday morning by the grim effects of cowardice in downtown Centennial Park.The Olympics continued, although not as carefree, not as innocent. Atlanta moved forward cautiously, knowing that only the competitions could salvage the city.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
ATLANTA -- Kerri Strug came into the 1996 Olympics as the unsung hero of the U.S. women's gymnastics team, one of the few members who had not renounced her amateur status. Now, as a result of becoming the heroic figure of Tuesday night's gold-medal performance in the team competition, Strug is no longer unsung.And, it appears, she no longer will go unpaid.Though she said yesterday that no deals have been struck, the 18-year-old from Tucson, Ariz., said that she will have to consider the endorsement deals being offered after she helped the United States win while completing her final vault on a badly sprained ankle.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 25, 1996
No matter what you may think of NBC's coverage to date, and many of you think a great deal, witness the booming ratings, the network certainly knows how to manipulate.There's no doubt that NBC played journalistic footsy with the circumstances surrounding Tuesday's women's team gymnastics finals, first by suggesting that the competition was live, when, in fact, it was over before the prime-time program ever came on the air at 7: 30 p.m.Then, it delayed any news of the injury to Kerri Strug until nearly the end of the telecast, more than four hours before some news organizations had reported it, and about an hour before Strug appeared on CNN to talk about her performance and the injury that followed.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- She couldn't call timeout.If Kerri Strug had been a basketball player, there would have been a trainer rushing on to the court and a chance to test her injured ankle. If she were a tennis player, she would have had 10 minutes to make a decision about whether to continue, as Boris Becker did this year with a wrist injury at Wimbledon.But Strug is a gymnast.There are no rules on the books, but there is a precedent to what Strug did here Tuesday night when she sprained her ankle on the first of two vaults, injured it even worse on her second, and was carried out of the Georgia Dome as America's latest Olympic hero.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 27, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- How's this for opening-night jitters?An American gymnast wept over chalk.The multimillion-dollar computer scoring system went berserk.And a reigning all-around world champion took a knock down on the balance beam, and could be knocked out of the gold rush for the greatest Olympic prize of all.Kim Zmeskal, whose steely nerves and linebacker power vTC launched her to the top of the gymnastics ladder, took a tumble from the top during last night's women's team compulsories at the 1992 Summer Olympics.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 25, 1996
No matter what you may think of NBC's coverage to date, and many of you think a great deal, witness the booming ratings, the network certainly knows how to manipulate.There's no doubt that NBC played journalistic footsy with the circumstances surrounding Tuesday's women's team gymnastics finals, first by suggesting that the competition was live, when, in fact, it was over before the prime-time program ever came on the air at 7: 30 p.m.Then, it delayed any news of the injury to Kerri Strug until nearly the end of the telecast, more than four hours before some news organizations had reported it, and about an hour before Strug appeared on CNN to talk about her performance and the injury that followed.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- Injured American gymnast Kerri Strug made the round of talk shows yesterday. Somewhere between NBC's "The Today Show" in the morning and CNN's "Talk Back Live" in the afternoon, the 18-year-old from Tucson, Ariz., came to a decision expected by everyone who watched her badly injure her left ankle in Tuesday night's optional finals: She would not compete in today's all-around competition at the Georgia Dome."I'm disappointed about my ankle," said Strug. "I made a decision to pull out of the all-around competition so I can compete in the event finals [Sunday and]
SPORTS
July 24, 1996
How hot it wasTemperature: High 92, low 73Humidity: 75 percent maximum, 55 percent most of the dayHeat index: 110 degreesPlaying with painThe U.S. women's gymnastics squad captured its first team Olympic gold medal after a dramatic vault by Kerri Strug. She collapsed in pain with a badly sprained ankle within seconds of landing.Strug, before a wildly cheering crowd of 32,048 at the Georgia Dome, was in instant pain after landing her final vault. Her left ankle recoiled upon impact, but Strug held her spot on one leg before dropping to her knees in severe pain.
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