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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
A major Baltimore developer made a preliminary deal yesterday to buy the ailing Belvedere Square, news hailed by top city officials as a significant step forward in the shopping center's troubled history. Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse Inc. announced yesterday that, with two business partners, it purchased an option to buy the nearly vacant Northeast Baltimore complex from James J. Ward III. A Struever Bros. official announced the deal last night at a City Council committee meeting at Govans Presbyterian Church.
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NEWS
Larry Perl | October 24, 2013
The developer of a planned mixed-use development in Charles Village on land owned by Johns Hopkins University is considering anchoring the project with a pharmacy, not a grocery store, as many area residents had feared. "The anchor tenant/retailer will likely be a 10,000-12,000-square-foot pharmacy, yet to be determined," Jennifer Mielke, director of the university's Office of Community Affairs, informed the Charles Village Civic Association in an email Oct. 23. Also being considered are market rate rental apartments aimed at students, but not dormitories, Mielke said.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | February 6, 1991
Ryland Group Inc. of Columbia and Baltimore-based developers Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse will build 283 town houses for low-income residents in West Baltimore, sharing a $16.4 million contract from Enterprise Nehemiah Development Inc."This is for-sale housing," said Vaike Talts , a spokeswoman for Ryland, the nation's second-biggest homebuilder. And she said the builders aren't taking the job as a charity case to provide low- and moderate-income housing."It's a straight business deal," she said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
A large chunk of waterfront property in Port Covington is set to go on the auction block in June after its previous owner, Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, defaulted on a multimillion-dollar mortgage. The now-defunct developer owed BB&T Bank more than $10.7 million for the roughly 10-acre parcel in South Baltimore off East Cromwell Street. A trustee-ordered sale is scheduled June 14. The foreclosure sale brings new hope to an area filled with weedy lots — an area where developers have struggled for decades to get a foothold.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Part of the Clipper Mill development in North Baltimore will go to a foreclosure auction later this month, including more than two dozen partially built upscale homes - the first setback for a project that has transformed long-vacant factories into a mix of shops, offices and homes. BB&T Bank has foreclosed on unfinished homes and lots in Overlook at Clipper Mill, planned as a community of contemporary two- and three-story houses, as well as on the cavernous Tractor Building, meant to become apartments, offices and parking.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
After two years of preparation and delays, Struever Brothers Eccles and Rouse, one of Baltimore's most prolific remodelers of underused urban properties, is about to start work on another collection of old and abandoned buildings in a slumping city block. The block is in Wilmington, Del., part of a multiyear, $60 million plan to revive the oldest part of that city. The designs are nearing completion, and Delaware Gov. Ruth Ann Minner is expected to sign today a bill to provide state tax credits for recycling the historic buildings, some of which date to the 1770s.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
A large chunk of waterfront property in Port Covington is set to go on the auction block in June after its previous owner, Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, defaulted on a multimillion-dollar mortgage. The now-defunct developer owed BB&T Bank more than $10.7 million for the roughly 10-acre parcel in South Baltimore off East Cromwell Street. A trustee-ordered sale is scheduled June 14. The foreclosure sale brings new hope to an area filled with weedy lots — an area where developers have struggled for decades to get a foothold.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
It was a cocktail party in an industrial wasteland. Waiters poured champagne in a gutted factory building. Strings of white lights cascaded from steel I-beams. And couples danced on a platform built atop enormous soap manufacturing tanks. Almost 2,000 people crowded into a celebration last night in the former Procter & Gamble Co. soap manufacturing plant in Locust Point to see the factory before a Baltimore development company transforms it into a high-tech office complex.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Several key parcels in Baltimore's Clipper Mill development were bought back at auction by the lender for $2.425 million Thursday in a foreclosure sale following the default on bank loans by the developer, Struever Bros., Eccles and Rouse. The auctioned properties included more than two dozen incomplete upscale homes in the 38-unit Overlook at Clipper Mill subdivision and the shell of the Tractor Building, a remnant of the old Clipper Mill Industrial Park. The sale was handled by Alex Cooper Auctioneers on behalf of BB&T Bank, the lender.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Several key parcels in Baltimore's Clipper Mill development were bought back at auction by the lender for $2.425 million Thursday in a foreclosure sale following the default on bank loans by the developer, Struever Bros., Eccles and Rouse. The auctioned properties included more than two dozen incomplete upscale homes in the 38-unit Overlook at Clipper Mill subdivision and the shell of the Tractor Building, a remnant of the old Clipper Mill Industrial Park. The sale was handled by Alex Cooper Auctioneers on behalf of BB&T Bank, the lender.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
The Marble Bar at the Congress Hotel was quietly re-listed again last week. The bar/club, which once hosted the likes of R.E.M. and Iggy Pop, went up for lease in December at an undisclosed price. But it seems no offers materialized. Congress Financial, which bought the hotel last year, retired the bar from the market several months ago, said Henry Deford, the JBL Real estate agent handling the property. The company listed it for lease because, with all 36 units at the once iconic hotel filled, it also wants to revive the bar, Deford said last year.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
A team that includes businessman C. William Struever and a nonprofit developer from East Baltimore has been selected to receive a $3 million state grant to help renovate a former printing plant, possibly for use as a "healthy foods" commissary for the city school system. Gov. Martin O'Malley has scheduled a Friday news conference to announce that the state is awarding the funds to convert the former A. Hoen Lithograph plant, an 85,000-square-foot facility at Chester and Biddle streets that has been vacant for decades, to a light industrial facility for one or more users.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
Two years after C. William Struever's real estate empire collapsed and the once-ubiquitous developer dropped off Baltimore's radar, the urban visionary has reappeared as a managing director of a new company, working on the same kinds of projects that helped make his name. Struever is one of the founders of Cross Street Partners, a real estate venture made up of 28 employees who all once worked for Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse, the company that changed Baltimore's landscape and that of other East Coast cities before coming apart in the throes of the recession, leaving a trail of lawsuits and unfinished developments.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 24, 2009
Johns Hopkins plans to buy the former Zurich Insurance Co. property in North Baltimore and relocate up to 1,100 workers to two large office buildings - a move expected to help stabilize the area and boost neighboring businesses. The 11.4-acre property at Keswick Road and 40th Street would be acquired by a subsidiary jointly owned by the Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins Health System in East Baltimore, to consolidate workers in finance, data processing and other services.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Several key parcels in Baltimore's Clipper Mill development were bought back at auction by the lender for $2.425 million Thursday in a foreclosure sale following the default on bank loans by the developer, Struever Bros., Eccles and Rouse. The auctioned properties included more than two dozen incomplete upscale homes in the 38-unit Overlook at Clipper Mill subdivision and the shell of the Tractor Building, a remnant of the old Clipper Mill Industrial Park. The sale was handled by Alex Cooper Auctioneers on behalf of BB&T Bank, the lender.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Several key parcels in Baltimore's Clipper Mill development were bought back at auction by the lender for $2.425 million Thursday in a foreclosure sale following the default on bank loans by the developer, Struever Bros., Eccles and Rouse. The auctioned properties included more than two dozen incomplete upscale homes in the 38-unit Overlook at Clipper Mill subdivision and the shell of the Tractor Building, a remnant of the old Clipper Mill Industrial Park. The sale was handled by Alex Cooper Auctioneers on behalf of BB&T Bank, the lender.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1999
The Baltimore development company that rehabilitated the dormant American Can Co. plant has turned its sights on renovating the abandoned Procter & Gamble Co. soap plant in Locust Point.Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse Inc.'s work on the Canton landmark resulted in significant retail space. It is studying converting the 26-acre waterfront site at 1422 Nicholson St. into primarily office space."In terms of the energy and the excitement level, we're thinking of it in terms of American Can, and in terms of the character we're hoping it will have -- but we're thinking at this point, and it's very early in the process -- that it will be just office space," said Bill Struever, the company's president.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
The Baltimore real estate developer credited with resuscitating the American Can Co. complex finalized yesterday the purchase of the derelict Procter & Gamble Co. plant in southern Baltimore, which city officials hope will serve as an anchor to revive economically struggling Locust Point.Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse Inc.'s plan to convert the former soap-making complex, which has been vacant since September 1995, into $53 million worth of office and retail space could bring as many as 2,000 jobs to an area decimated by the closings of manufacturing plants.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | December 1, 2009
Part of the Clipper Mill development in North Baltimore will go to a foreclosure auction later this month, including more than two dozen partially built upscale homes - the first setback for a project that has transformed long-vacant factories into an mix of shops, offices and homes. BB&T Bank has foreclosed on unfinished homes and lots in Overlook at Clipper Mill, planned as a community of contemporary two- and three-story houses, as well as on the cavernous Tractor Building, meant to become apartments, offices and parking.
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