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NEWS
February 8, 2013
There are many people wondering why the Republican Party has run campaigns that are not well coordinated, are divisive on some issues and can't seem to get their messages to impact on the American people the way that Democrats do. Here's the real problem: They don't have a well organized structure to hold them together and make things happen. Sure, there are powerful people like the Koch Brothers who push a conservative philosophy, and there are many rich folks who support the Republicans with finances.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 8, 2014
A run-down uninhabited house at 506 Locksley Road that has been the subject of complaints for the last two years from West Towson neighbors has been sold, County Councilman Marks said. "We're happy to get this resolved," said Marks, who represents Towson. "It's been an eyesore. The county worked very, very hard on this. " Marks said the winning bidder was a builder with plans to raze the structure. The auction company, A.J. Billig & Co., confirmed the sale but would not identify the buyer.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
IWIF is changing its name and corporate structure on Oct. 1, the workers' compensation insurer said Tuesday. The state's largest workers' compensation provider will become Chesapeake Employers' Insurance Co. and stop operating as an independent state agency. Under changes being made as a result of state legislation last year, the newly named entity will become a non-stock, not-for-profit, private insurance company that will sell workers' compensation insurance in Maryland. IWIF, which provides insurance to more than 20,000 employers in the state, has a 23 percent market share.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | September 3, 2014
Friday, the Labor Department is expected to report that the economy added 230,000 jobs in August. The pace has picked up a bit but is still far less than needed to reemploy all the prime aged workers displaced in the wake of the financial crisis. The jobless rate is down to 6.1 percent but that stat is deceptive. For example, one in six adult males between the ages of 25 and 54 is not working. Many don't show up in the unemployment count because they are not actively looking for a job. They spend their days cluttering park benches or watching ESPN because they are too discouraged to look for work or lack the incentive to make an effort.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley's call for public hearings to explore the relationship between Constellation Energy Group and its subsidiary, Baltimore Gas and Electric, may strike some as a purely political exercise. After all, it's not as if the genie of deregulation is headed back into the bottle. It's doubtful any new information can be gleaned that will result in the company's breakup or rebates for customers. But BGE's sticker-shocked 1.1 million customers deserve to know more about the utility's relationship with its parent and whether there are steps the Maryland Public Service Commission or General Assembly could take, if not to bring down electricity rates, at least to lessen future rate increases.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | April 15, 1995
The first question most people have when they're considering building an addition to an existing structure is: How will it work; how will it attach to the existing building?The answer, like the old joke, is "very carefully."The care becomes even more important when the new addition is being built on top of a previous addition. In that case, the problem becomes how to securely attach the new structure to the old one at the sides and at the floor/ceiling in a way that distributes the load, or weight, securely.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Baltimore building inspectors condemned the House of Welsh tavern yesterday, which might indefinitely delay opening a $1 million nightclub in the 170-year-old structure. Inspectors determined the building, at Guilford Avenue and Saratoga Street, was not safe, so investors must submit plans for repairing it before work can proceed, said Zack Germroth, spokesman for the department of Housing and Community Development. They must also submit design plans for the nightclub and obtain work permits, Germroth said.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | April 24, 2008
April is a propulsive force in the north. Snow melts and the flotsam of spring appears: a child's mitten in the mud, a soap bubble ring; the lilac bushes bud, a light haze of green shows in the tops of trees. The cry of the lawn mower is heard. Mating begins, females ruffling their tail feathers, young males biting the alpha male in the rump to drive him off. And soon, suddenly, all of nature will open up, leaf out, burgeon, thrive and prosper. And then in the midst of it comes the anniversary of the massacre at Virginia Tech, with "survivors" talking on NPR about their pain and the healing process and how vulnerable they feel and how their lives have been affected.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
The Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association has appointed a 10-member committee to examine the structure of its football playoffs.But executive secretary Ned Sparks said it is too early to speculate on whether recommendations might include expanding the playoffs from its present eight-team format to 16 in each of the state's four enrollment-based classifications.The committee was charged "to review the MPSSAA football tournament format by examining its structure for equitable, safe and educationally sound competition and make recommendations to the MPSSAA's Board of Control," Sparks said.
NEWS
March 17, 2005
Construction workers digging a foundation in an empty lot apparently caused the wall of a neighboring old building to collapse yesterday afternoon, sending brick and splinters of wood onto the intersection of West and Light streets in Federal Hill but injuring no one, city police said. A building inspector condemned the vacant structure and it was immediately demolished -- sending up a cloud of dust that drew a crowd of neighborhood children, and leaving a pile of rubble at a corner where new construction is under way. "It's a shame to see an old building like that go," said Officer Adam Long.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
City police officials have replaced the department's homicide chief in the wake of a string of unsolved murders this summer that shattered what had been a period of relative calm. Maj. Stanley Brandford will take over the homicide unit from Maj. Dennis Smith, who had been running homicide along with the shooting and robbery divisions since April. Putting the unit under separate command is probably the right move given the outsized role homicides play in shaping perceptions of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Tests conducted on Ravens starting cornerback Lardarius Webb's lower back revealed no structural damage, according to sources. Webb's back injury, which was suffered last Friday and has sidelined him since the second day of training camp, is apparently muscular. The team is expected to be cautious with Webb to avoid this becoming a chronic, long-term injury. Webb's availability for practices will be evaluated on a day-to-day, week-to-week basis. At this point, the injury isn't expected to affect Webb in the regular season and is expected to get better with rest and rehabilitation.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In one of the city's first historic preservation battles, Baltimore residents paid $17,000 in 1924 to save the soaring Phoenix Shot Tower from a wrecking ball and a future as a Union Oil Company gas station. Today, preservationists are again rallying around the Shot Tower. While it is no longer in danger - the city has abandoned a 2012 proposal to consider selling more than a dozen historic properties, including the tower - they say more needs to be done to showcase the attraction and to fully restore what was once the nation's tallest building.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | March 10, 2014
Units from Howard County's Department of Rescue Services responded to a structure fire at an Ellicott City residence on Saturday night, according to the department's Facebook page.  The Facebook post said the fire, which occurred at a home in the in the 3800 block of Woodville Lane in Ellicott City, appeared to have originated on the exterior and extended into the second floor and attic. No injuries were reported, according to the post.  No assistance from the Red Cross was required, according to the post.  #sigshell { padding: 10px; float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 25, 2014
Fire damaged a mobile home near Aberdeen Friday evening. The home, at Wright's Mobile Home Village in the 1100 block of Old Philadelphia Road, was reported on fire shortly after 5 p.m. Initial emergency radio dispatches said the resident reported smoke in the home's bathroom. When the first responder from the Aberdeen Fire Department arrived at the scene, a working fire was immediately reported. Approximately 24 firefighters from the Aberdeen Fire Department, Aberdeen Proving Ground Fire Department and Abingdon Volunteer Fire Company brought the fire under control in about 10 minutes, according to a notice of investigation from the Maryland State Fire Marshal's Office.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Changes proposed by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for Baltimore's controversial and so-far unsuccessful taxi tax drew mixed reviews from city taxi and livery firms. The proposed amendments to the tax, to be introduced before the City Council today, would switch the levy from 25 cents per passenger to 35 cents per trip for taxis starting July 1. The city implemented the tax Oct. 1, but many taxi operators simply ignored it, with some complaining and refusing to pay it. Others only began complying after they were allowed to pass the cost on to customers.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 16, 1995
Q: I have a big bust and cannot wear the simple slip dresses. I also find it embarrassing to show too much bust. What do you suggest?A: Forget about the simple slip dress and look for one with a built-in bra. Many designers realize how impractical the basic slip is for most women.In Paris, Emanuel Ungaro explains: "I have always believed in dressing real women, and real women need structure in clothes. Even when I use the most fluid fabrics I add structure. It's concealed, but it's there."
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- In the lexicon of lying, there are white lies and bare-faced lies. Facts can be fudged, forged or shaded. There are fibbers, fabricators and feckless fabulists. By whatever clinical term, the truth simply is not in some people. Now scientists have an anatomical inkling why. A new study from the University of Southern California, published in this month's issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry, suggests that the talent for compulsive deception is embedded in the structure of the brain itself.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
The root cause for inequality, especially concerning health and economic advancement, stems from the tendency among a subset of humans who patronize only those individuals who are subservient to them ( "Inequality is the new norm in the U.S.," Jan. 15). From that viewpoint, I credit the majority of people of the United States for bending over backward to get ahead in life without knowingly hurting others or looking the other away when confronted with injustice. If there is a change to be made, society must understand the factors that modulate new ideas.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Members of the City Council are considering amending Baltimore's controversial new taxi tax, switching collection from the current per-passenger structure to a per-trip basis. "Some of us think it might be more efficient and effective to do per trip," Councilman Carl Stokes, chair of the taxation committee, said Thursday. The proposed change comes after months of complaints from taxi drivers and cab, limousine and other livery companies that the current per-passenger collection structure is far too burdensome.
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